MFLN “Network News” – April 2016

first_imgReturning Warriors: Using Outdoor Recreation for Restoration & ResilienceWebinar hosted by the Family Transitions and Community Capacity Building concentration areas (recording available) Welcome to the April edition of “Network News!”Representatives from the seven concentration areas teams of the Military Families Learning Network and our liaison from the Office of Family Readiness Policy gathered in San Antonio, Texas last week for our annual network-wide meeting.  It was an opportunity to reflect on the strides we’ve made in the past year and to brainstorm for the year ahead. As the MFLN has scaled up in size, we have diversified our professional development offerings and have begun to explore the intersections of these various areas of research and practice. Cross-disciplinary collaboration is one of the greatest benefits of our structure as a network. By delving into these intersections, in the spirit of the Military Family Readiness System, military family service providers and Cooperative Extension educators are able to expand their knowledge and awareness beyond their own field. Throughout our discussions the other day, it was thrilling to hear of the multitude of collaborative possibilities that await.In case you missed them, check out a few of the recent cross-disciplinary professional development opportunities:Military Family Financial Transitions: Handling Changes in Income, Benefits, & Money ManagementWebinar and Twitter chat hosted by the Personal Finance and Family Transitions concentration areas (recording available) Finally, don’t forget to mark your calendar for one (or more!) of our upcoming professional development opportunities this month.last_img read more


Day One: Tips for Establishing Collaborative Relationships with Families

first_imgBy Dora Doss, M.S., SLP-CCC Image from Pixabay.com, CCO Return to article. Long DescriptionImage from Pixabay.com, CCOWhen an early intervention service provider begins working with a new family, often a primary goal is to establish a collaborative relationship right from the start. Research has highlighted the benefits of discussing a provider’s role with a family during the first initial visit and encouraging families to view their role as an intervener (Davies, Marshall, Brown, & Goldbart, 2016).  By engaging in at-home activities with their child and communicating with the provider, caregivers assume the role of primary change agent (Davies et al., 2016).  Additionally, an early interventionist should see themselves as a family coach, promoting a conceptualization of activities targeting a child’s goals within established routines (Davies et al., 2016). In addition to discussing roles, there are six traits that a provider can focus on during the initial visit to establish a collaborative relationship.Communication.  The communication between family members and providers should be honest and open. When communicating with families, take time to listen for what is most important to them. Communicate clearly, while being sensitive to the emotions a parent or caregiver may have related to the delays their child is experiencing (Blue-Banning, Summers, Frankland, Nelson, & Beegle, 2004).Trust.  Caregivers should feel that the provider working with their family can be trusted.  Providers can establish trust by being punctual and consistent. Families also should feel confident that their child’s early interventionist will keep the information they share confidential.  Trust is also built when a provider values a family’s goals and priorities above their own (Blue-Banning et al., 2004).Humility. Early interventionists have a strong base of knowledge related to developmental delays and disorders.  However, the caregiver is the expert on their child and should be valued as such (Kriston, 2017). A strong partnership is built when the expertise of both the provider and the family intersect to develop a family-centered plan to address a child’s developmental concerns and family goals.Flexibility. Family dynamics and circumstances will differ from one family to another.  Personalities within a family can vary as well.  A provider who adjusts their approach, style, and even the ways in which they communicate to better serve a family demonstrates flexibility.  Author and educator Elizabeth Kriston (2017) calls this “being a chameleon.”Withhold Judgement. Keeping an open mind and a willingness to learn about a family’s values and goals is key to establishing a strong collaborative relationship.  Providers should learn about a family’s schedule, work obligations, and cultural beliefs. This is especially important when serving military families as their schedule and family life may require flexibility related to their connection to military service.  Families should feel understood and not judged as they work to best support their child’s development (Blue-Banning et al., 2004).Empowerment. Early interventionists have an opportunity to prepare caregivers to be effective team members and advocates for their children. Blue-Banning and colleagues (2004) stressed that early intervention should “not only engage parents as collaborative partners while they receive services, but it should also prepare parents to be effective partners with special services they encounter as their child grows older” (p. 168).  Early intervention providers can influence caregivers’ views on the special services system and collaboration with professionals.  Strengthening caregivers’ view of working with professionals and advocating as crucial team members can yield positive interactions for years to come. This is especially important when working with families whose children may need services beyond early intervention.As providers strengthen their skills in these six areas, strong collaborative relationships can be built with families.  These relationships can then serve as a means through which a child grows and achieves positive outcomes.ReferencesBlue-Banning, M., Summers, J. A., Corine Frankland, H., Nelson, L. L., & Beegle, G. (2004). Dimensions of family and professional partnerships: Constructive guidelines for collaboration. Exceptional Children, 70(2), 167–184. https://doi.org/10.1177/001440290407000203Davies, K. E., Marshall, J., Brown, L. J., & Goldbart, J. (2017). Co-working: Parents’ conception of roles in supporting their children’s speech and language development. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 33(2), 171–185. https://doi.org/10.1177/0265659016671169Kriston, E. (2017, December 12).  Nine Tips for Building Relationships in Early Intervention [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://www.medbridgeeducation.com/blog/2017/12/9-tips-building-relationships-early-intervention/This post was edited by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, onTwitter, and YouTube.last_img read more


16 Post Production Sites You Should Be Reading

first_imgVideo editors, check out these great websites that are a wealth of knowledge for all things post production. From great tutorials to quick tips, these sites will help you stay on top of your post production game!In a previous post, we rounded up the best filmmaking websites, but with all the great post production and video editing sites, that topic is surely deserving of it’s own hit list. In this roundup, we’ve picked the best video editing sites in 2013, great daily reads when you’re waiting on a render or have a few minutes to spare. Bookmark these!Know a video editing site that didn’t make the list? Share it in the comments below!Stay up to date with the post production industry, and pick up some new tips and skills in the process. In no particular order, the best post production and video editing sites:Little Frog in High DefShane Ross shares his experiences as a television editor in LA. An active post production voice on Twitter, Shane’s blog documents his “insider view” on the process of editing TV shows. He works mainly with Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro, but his insights on workflow are helpful for any editor. DigitalfilmsOliver Peters is a veteran film editor and colorist who shares his insights on post production. On his video editing site you’ll find a nice balance of tutorials, behind the scenes editing workflow and insightful thoughts on the industry.Philip HodgettsPhilip Hodgetts blogs about technology relating to post production and distribution. Philip is the mastermind behind many video editing plugins and software tools and he’s on the forefront of the future of post production. His blog is a fascinating read that covers topics both creative and technical. Creative ImpatienceBartlomiej Walczak writes about post production and color grading on his video editing blog, “Creative Impatience”. He focuses on the Adobe post production tools: Premiere Pro, After Effects, & SpeedGrade. He also offers useful free plugins (feathered crop, vignettes) for Premiere Pro & After Effects.  Monica Edits (Sh*tting Sparkles)The name of this video editing blog comes from a common joke about editors making crappy video look good. The blog is a first-person account of a pro video editor, Monica Daniel. She shares her stories from the edit suite, everything from project breakdowns to picking an ergonomic mouse for editing.A Nonlinear Editor’s BlogMichael is a German video and sound editor who shares his tips on video/audio post production. The blog is a mix of helpful articles, product reviews and tutorials, with a good bit of focus on working with audio in your video editing projects.SpliceVineEric Wise covers different video editing and post production subjects each month and often features expert guest writers. The content focuses on delivery and transmedia as well as editing and color grading. Be sure to check out the free email newsletter, as well as the SpliceVine monthly post production podcasts.Chris Hall Color Correction BlogIf you’re interested in color correction and color grading, Chris Hall’s color blog is chocked full of useful info. He offers a series of video tutorials “Anatomy of a Grade” on creating specific looks in DaVinci Resolve. This post production blog is recommended for those learning Resolve (there is a free Lite version) and wanting more control over their grading. Norman HollynNorman Hollyn is film editor and Professor who shares his thoughts on the industry. Subjects cover technique, theory, and technology.Jonny Elwyn (Toolbox)Jonny Elwyn is a a London based Editor (and fellow Premiumbeat blogger ) who shares his experiences and thoughts on post production. Jonny dishes up his own insight into editing and working with clients, and shares videos and interviews from leaders in the industry. He often compares the differences in video editing applications, like his popular series on switching to AVID Media Composer.Alexis Van Hurkman  (update: now writing for Pro Video Coalition)Alexis Van Hurkman is a well known colorist who wrote the Apple Color and DaVinci Resolve manuals, as well as several other books. On his own site he shares his knowledge of color grading, and he recently started another blog at Pro Video Coalition.  EditblogScott Simmons has been an active online authority on post production and video editing for several years now. He writes a frequently updated blog on ProVideo Coalition called The Edit Blog, where he shares his thoughts on the industry, as well as product reviews and video editing tips/tricks.Be sure to follow him on Twitter as well.Art of the GuillotineArt of the Guillotine (AotG) is an aggregate of the best post producution articles. On the site, film professor and post production pro Gordon Burkell reposts useful video editing and production related posts from around the web. The site is a hit list of relevant info for industry pros.Bonus SitesHere are 3 popular sites you may already know and are certainly worth checking out:ProLost is the blog of Stu Maschwitz ( Creative Director for Red Giant’s Magic Bullet). He writes about editing, color correction, and digital cinema.Digital Rebellion have a blog and “weekend read” that cover editing, industry news and their workflow apps.Tao of Color Offer a free weekly newsletter on color grading. Patrick saves you a lot of time and gathers great resources from the web.last_img read more


Stop Putting Process Over People

first_imgI had an interaction with a large, very well known company this week. During this interaction, it was very clear that the person I was working with had no idea what they were doing, even before I asked for something that was a little challenging for her to deliver. She put me on hold five or six times, and the total interaction took almost an hour. But she did her very best, and she was very polite.The large, well known company then sent me a survey. The first question asked: “I would hire the representative I spoke with if I owned a customer service company.” I was asked to choose a rating from 0 (strongly disagree) to 10 (strongly agree).I am always unhappy giving up an hour of my life to handle an issue that should be easily resolved in a few minutes. But this customer service representative wasn’t to blame. The process was to blame.Training: It was clear the customer service person hadn’t been through any serious training. She didn’t have any idea how to respond to my request. She had to put me on hold because she had to go to her supervisor for help.I have no idea how much training she had, but my hallucination is that she was put on the phones because they needed help, not because she was well trained and ready. The hiring, training, and onboarding process are broken, not the customer service person.Hold Time: I was on hold a long time. During the time, the customer service person waited for her supervisor to give her direction. The time she waited for direction was the time I waited for an answer. I am certain the supervisor had good intentions, and I imagine he was dealing with a long line of customer service people waiting for answers.The process of providing the customer service person with help is broken. It’s broken for the customer service person, and it’s broken for the supervisor. That means it’s broken for the customer.Broken Survey: The survey is broken, too. The first question asks me whether I would hire the customer service person if I owned a customer service company. It sounds clever. I am sure the person who designed the question believes that the single greatest factor as to my satisfaction during my call is the customer service person. They may even believe that that person is empowered to help me. But the person wasn’t empowered.A better question would be “I would utilize the same process used if I owned a customer service company.”It’s easy to blame people. It’s easier than providing them with the tools, the training, the technology, the leadership, and the process they need to succeed. Assume people have good intentions and they are constrained by process. Don’t assume the process is good and you are constrained by people.QuestionsWhen people struggle, is it always the person’s fault?How does process constrain people instead of empowering them?How do you build a process that gives people the flexibility to act on behalf of the customer?What do you do to prepare people in a way that allows you to trust that they’ll make the right decision?last_img read more


Outbound > Inbound

first_imgWith all due respect to inbound, outbound is greater.Eliminates Waiting: Outbound eliminates you waiting by the phone or living in your inbox, hoping that a lead finally arrives. It eliminates the need for you to wait for your marketing department to deliver that lead. And don’t have to wait for your dream client to engage with you. Inbound assumes that your dream clients are going to beat a path to your door. Outbound assumes that no such thing is going to happen. Outbound eliminates your need to wait for something to happen or someone else to give you a lead to work. Inbound makes you a dependent. Outbound makes you self-reliant.Eliminates Need for Luck: A “Bluebird” is an opportunity that comes to you completely sold and ready-to-buy. It’s nice to catch a bluebird. But it’s lucky, and luck isn’t a strategy. If it were, you could repeat it–and you can’t. How much luck is necessary for your dream client to Google a search term that leads them directly to you? However much luck that takes, you don’t have enough of it. Outbound eliminates the need for luck. The Gods of Sales smile on salespeople who consistently prospect. Those same Gods mock the salesperson who waits for luck.Establishes Presence: You want to be known as a value-creator before your dream client establishes that they have a need. You want the people who are going to initiate change to know who you are, to have spoken with you, and to have experienced your shared ideas that prove you have chops. The earlier you establish your presence, the more likely your dream client will call on you when they need something. You also want your dream client to know with great certainty that you are pursuing them. The further in front of an opportunity, the better.Control Your Destiny: Inbound puts your destiny in someone else’s hands. A lot of someones, in fact. Outbound is how you take control of your destiny, your future, your results.Inbound marketing is wonderful. So is content marketing. But outbound is still greater.last_img read more


Buyers Are Not Demanding You Social Sell Them

first_img You will still need to do what sales people have always done. Make contact. Create opportunity. Create value. And make the sale. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now No one is waiting for your cold call. No one has ever said to themselves upon awakening, “Man, I hope some salesperson calls me out of the blue today.” The chances of the words being uttered at any time in the future are precisely 0.0%.Nor is there anyone demanding that you social sell them, either.Buyers are not hoping that you to send them an invitation on LinkedIn and follow it up by hammering them with an appointment request a half millisecond later. They don’t hope for a completely self-oriented email that creates no value for them. There isn’t anything here that makes this approach inherently better than a phone call.No buyer is waiting for you to tweet them, nor are they waiting for a direct message. No one is waiting to engage with you on Twitter. No one is begging for you to share links with them, or hoping that you be patient while they come to realize that all of your sharing on social media means that you are someone who can help them with their challenges or opportunities.If you’re going to be a thought leader, you are going to need compelling content. If you are going to use social tools to build your personal brand and create new opportunities, you are going to have to go deep, creating content that distinguishes you within your space. If you are going to curate or synthesize other people’s content, you are going to have to add something meaningful, some point of view that is valuable, something that makes your thought leadership stand out.No one is demanding that you social sell them, because no is demanding that you sell them at all.Because social selling doesn’t actually happen. Customers won’t discover you via your social efforts and sign up. Your social activity can create awareness of you and what you represent, but it doesn’t change what actually must occur for you to sell.last_img read more


Rajasthan village boy wins laurels with grit

first_imgBy his sheer grit and determination, a poor teenage boy from a remote village in Jodhpur district of Rajasthan has won laurels by getting prizes and awards, thanks to his teachers’ guidance and an educational quality support programme honing his skills.High scoresFifteen-year-old Dharma Ram has excelled in both academics and extra-curricular activities, winning prizes in athletics, kabaddi and inter-school arts competitions, in addition to scoring high marks in his science subject. He is at present a student of Class X at the Government Senior Secondary school in Dhandhaniya Bhaila village.Financial hurdlesDharma started his education at the age of six years in his native Jati Bandhu village, when his family was struggling to make ends meet. His father was working at a stone quarry and mother was battling the last stage of cancer.During his early days in school, Dharma’s teachers sensed his thirst for knowledge and encouraged him to polish his talent. The young boy’s confidence and resolution grew with the passage of time. In addition to his keen interest in science, he emerged as an all-rounder student.Dharma lost his mother to cancer and his father quit his daily job at the mines due to failing health, while the family survived on occasional stints at the stone quarries. Despite such tough conditions, Dharma has excelled in academics and won several medals at the State-level science quiz competitions.Science teacher Dharma told The Hindu from Dhandhaniya Bhaila village that he aspires to be a science teacher. He is getting help from the Satya Bharti Quality Support Programme, which covers his school. His family comprising two brothers, a sister and father continues to face financial hurdles.Represents schoolThe young boy has recently won first prize in a State-level science exhibition organised by the Ministry of Human Resource Development. He was also sent to represent his school at a State-level science quiz competition, where he won the third prize and was encouraged to continue pursuing his aspirations in the field of science.School principal Lalit Kumar said Dharma, consistently a topper in his class, was preparing hard for his examinations due next month.last_img read more


Five Maoists killed in Dantewada encounter

first_imgFive alleged members of the outlawed Communist Party of India (Maoist) were killed during an encounter with security forces in Dantewada district of south Chhattisgarh on Saturday.Two security personnel also suffered injuries during the exchange of fire. Some reports suggest that seven Maoists were killed, but the security forces could recover only five bodies.“One of the dead Maoists was identified as area secretary of the Maoists’ Malangir area committee,” Chhattisgarh’s Anti Naxal Operations unit said in a statement.The injured sub-inspectors, Dogendra Patro and Sangram Singh, are said to be out of danger.last_img


Villagers stumble upon rare idol

first_imgVillagers stumbled upon a rare and beautiful idol of Mahavira, believed to be dating back to the 9th-10th century AD while levelling a field at the Parahata village in Odisha’s Jagatsinghpur district. Villagers installed the three-feet-high idol, discovered five days ago, in the village temple. A couple of years ago, a one-foot high statue of the Buddha made of red brass was also found while a farmer was tilling his field.“A contractor required soil to level a canal road passing through our village. Bhaguni, a villager, volunteered to even out his field. When the bucket teeth of the earthmover hit some hard substance, we advised the earthmover’s operator not to apply force. Then we carefully dug the area around the statue and brought it out,” said Parahata villager Bhawani Panda.Villagers say they have come across many earthen pots and other unrecognisable earthen items while levelling the field. They wonder if a proper excavation would reveal more.“The idol is in standing position on a lotus pedestal. We generally find single idols of Mahavira. Statues with images of deities as well as devotees carved on stone were widely in circulation in the 9th-10th century AD,” said Sunil Patnaik, archaeologist with the Odisha Institute of Maritime and South-East Asian Studies.last_img read more


Issue fresh licences for meat traders: HC

first_imgThe Allahabad High Court on Friday directed the Uttar Pradesh government to start issuing fresh licences and no-objection certificates (NOCs) to meat traders in the State while also renewing existing licences. The court also rejected the State’s contention that ensuring the functioning and modernisation of slaughterhouses was not its responsibility and said the responsibility for constructing slaughterhouses lay with the local municipal corporations. It also said the State could not prevent people from eating meat.Order on PIL pleasA Lucknow Division Bench of Justices A.P Shahi and Sanjai Harkauli passed the interim order while hearing a bunch of 27 PIL petitions filed against the blanket shutting down of slaughterhouses and meat shops in the State after the BJP came to power in March.The court also directed the State to file its reply by July 17, the next date of hearing, and apprise it of the steps taken to find a solution to the issue of slaughterhouses and meat shops. The court said it was giving the State “ample time” to “gear up its machinery for taking positive action in the matter.”The court directed the concerned departments of the State and local bodies to renew the licenses of slaughterhouses and also issue licences based on prescribed norms. The local bodies will obliged to consider and grant No Objection Certificates as and where required under the 2011 Regulations, it said.Allow lawful activity“The inaction of the State Government in the past should not be a shield for imposing a state of almost prohibition. To provide an immediate check on unlawful activity should be simultaneous with facilitating the carrying of lawful activity, particularly that relating to food, food habits and vending thereof that is undisputedly connected with the right to life and livelihood,” the court said it its order.The court also directed the State to circulate the order among all Divisional Commissioners and District Magistrates in the State as well as local bodies so that they can provide all material to the State for implementation of the policy and removal of all obstacles.Soon after coming to power, the Yogi Adityanath government had directed administrative and police authorities to shut down or seal slaughterhouses in the State which according to it were running unlawfully or were unregistered. However, with the abattoirs, the State also shut down meat shops, throwing thousands of livelihoods into crisis. Those involved in the trade had argued that the action was arbitrary and violated their right to livelihood.The State had contended that it was under no obligation to construct slaughter houses or make provisions for them and was merely acting against illegal setups in accordance with the norms of the National Green Tribunal (NGT). V. K Singh, counsel for the meat traders, said the court’s order was a clear “rejection” of the State’s stand.last_img read more


Six-foot snake at Taj causes panic

first_imgA six-foot-long rat snake was spotted in the Taj Mahal premises on Monday, causing panic among visitors.A team of experts from Wildlife SOS arrived at the monument and rescued the snake. The rat snake is harmless, feeding mostly on birds and rodents.The staff at the Taj Mahal called for help and a rapid response team was dispatched by Wildlife SOS. The team found the reptilian visitor cooling off under a water cooler in the water filtration plant.Officials of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) immediately stopped the water filtration plant. The Wildlife SOS team, along with the ASI staff, moved workers and curious tourists to a safe distance from the snake before starting the rescue process.After an hour-long operation, the Wildlife SOS team managed to successfully extricate the reptile.Munazzar Ali, Senior Conservation Assistant, ASI, said: “There are four RO plants inside the Taj Mahal to ensure proper water supply for public water taps. As soon as the snake was spotted inside the plant, considering the safety of tourists and workers, we immediately contacted Wildlife SOS for their assistance. The team was very efficient in rescuing the snake.”Baiju Raj M.V of Wildlife SOS said: “The severe heat must have driven the snake in search for water and a cool place. We thank the ASI and the officials of the Taj Mahal for considering the safety of the tourists and the snake and contacting Wildlife SOS.”last_img read more


Eight charged in LeT attack on police

first_imgThe police on Friday filed a chargesheet against eight people, including an Uttar Pradesh resident, for colluding in the Lashkar-e-Taiba attack on the police in June 2017, which left six policemen dead.“Based on the disclosures of U.P. resident Sandeep Kumar Sharma, an accused in the case, who was arrested from an encounter site on July 1, 2017 where two militants were killed, the investigators cracked the case,” said the police.Sharma, son of Ram Kumar, a resident of Muzaffarnagar, faces charges under Sections 302, 397, 326, 427, 120-B RPC, 7/27 Arms Act 16,18, 20 and 40 of the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act. The other accused were identified as Mohammad Ashraf Wani alias Molvi of Brenti Dailgam, Khurshid Ahmad Ganie of Brenti Dailgam, Mehraj-ud-Din Bangroo alias Asif of Narparistan, Sahir Ahmad Makroo of Arwani Bijbehara, Zeenat-ul-Islam alias Zeeshan of Sugan Shopian, Bashir Ahmad Wani alias Lashkari of Soaf Shali Kokernag and Abu Maz, a foreign terrorist from Pakistan.Wani and Maz were killed in an encounter last year.Main accusedAccording to the Special Investigation Team (SIT), Lashkari “was the main accused and was involved in the attack.”The police said Station House Officer Feroz Ahmad, who was killed in the attack, “was at the forefront of anti-militancy operations in the area” and was ambushed in Thajiwara village on the outskirts of Anantnag town.last_img read more


5-year-old girl gang-raped in Hoshiarpur, Punjab

first_imgA five-year-old girl, daughter of a migrant labourer, was brutally raped by unidentified men in Dasuya town in Hoshiarpur district, police said on Tuesday.The girl was admitted to the Civil Hospital, Dasuya from where she was referred to PGIMER, Chandigarh, in a critical condition after the incident on Monday night, they said.Police said the girl went missing from her house last night at about 10:30 p.m. when there was a power shutdown in the area. The family members lodged a missing report with the Dasuya police station late on Monday night. On Tuesday, a passer-by noticed the girl lying in an unconscious state near a railway track. Some blood stained clothes were also found there.The father of the girl is a migrant labourer, police said. Dr. Rajesh Bagga, Senior Medical Officer at Dasuya Civil Hospital, confirmed gang rape and said the victim suffered external as well as internal wounds. A case was registered at the Dasuya police station under relevant provisions of the POCSO Act and the IPC, police said.last_img read more


‘Dues of cane farmers will be paid soon’

first_imgUttar Pradesh Cane Development Minister Suresh Rana said on Monday that the State will ensure the entire cane arrears of around ₹10,000 crore are paid to farmers before the start of the new season from October. A proposal to provide ₹5,535 crore for the purpose of clearing cane dues of both cooperative and private sector will be placed before the Cabinet in the coming week, he said. Sugarcane crushing season in Uttar Pradesh, the country’s leading sugar producing State, starts from October 20 and continues till November 5. “Cane arrears have come down to around ₹10,000 crore. We have kept a target to bring the dues to zero before the start of the new season from October 20,” Mr. Rana told reporters on the sidelines of 59th annual general meeting of the National Federation of Sugar Factories Ltd here. The State government will place a Cabinet proposal seeking approval of ₹5,535 crore funds, which was allocated in the State budget for sugar sector, he said. As per the proposal, Mr. Rana said the State government will provide ₹1,010 crore to cooperative mills, ₹25 crore to a state mill and ₹500 crore to private mills for direct payment of cane dues.Soft loan Another ₹4,000 crore will be made available through a soft loan to private mills for clearing cane payment. The modality of the soft loan is being worked out, he added. He did not elaborate further. Earlier speaking at the AGM, he said the State government is committed towards cane growers.last_img read more


‘No leader has testified in Koraput gang-rape case’

first_imgOver 12 months after the gang rape of a minor girl near Kunduli in Koraput district and her subsequent death by hanging, no leader of any political party or social organisation has come forward to file an affidavit or testify before the Judicial Commission set up by the Odisha government to probe the case.The 15-year-old victim had alleged that on October 10, 2017, she was gang-raped by four men dressed as jawans of paramilitary forces near Kunduli. She had killed herself by hanging at her home in Musaguda on January 22 this year.On November 8, 2017, the government had ordered a judicial inquiry into the incident by a sitting district judge. A parallel enquiry by the State Crime Branch was also ordered. But to date the culprits have not been identified.Speaking to The Hindu, special counsel of the Judicial Commission, Prabhakar Patnaik, said the time period of the Commission ended on September 25 this year and, as per his knowledge, it has already furnished its report to the State government. Mr. Patnaik said no leader of any political party or social organisation came out to testify or provide evidence before the Commission.According to Mr. Patnaik, advertisements were published in two Odia and one English newspapers inviting documents and evidence from any stakeholder to be furnished before the Commission. Family members of the victim were witnesses of the Commission. Fifteen others, including police officers involved in the investigation of the case, doctors who treated the victim and the Koraput District Child Protection Officer testified before the Commission.last_img read more


Brothers held for cheating

first_imgTwo brothers, residents of Gurugram, were arrested by the on Tuesday night for allegedly duping a resident of Delhi running a business in Noida in 2009, the police said on Wednesday.The police said that the accused, Amit and Aman Sayal, had duped the victim of more than ₹2 crore on the pretext of selling him a property, which was not even registered in their name.“They had provided the victim, Sudhir Gupta, with fake documents pertaining to the property. The victim owned a property in Sector 6 and had showed interest in an adjacent property, which the accused claimed to own,” said Manoj Kumar Pant, Station House Officer, Sector 20 police station.The police said that the victim paid the amount to the accused in instalments and was also provided with fake ownership documents. However, when the victim went to the Noida Authority to complete the registration, they found that the property was not owned by the accused.“A case had been registered in this regard and and a non-bailable warrant was issued for the accused by the district court,” said a senior police officer.The police also said that the accused had been involved in cases of fraud. About 37 cases have been identified so far against them all over India, including Hyderabad, Mumbai, Delhi, Gujarat. The police also said that whenever the victims would approach the accused and demand their money back they would get assaulted by bouncers.last_img read more



Video: A Perfect Solar Storm

first_imgOn 23 July 2012, two eruptions on the sun known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) burst from an active patch of sunspots on the far side of the sun, which is monitored by a probe that circles the sun ahead of Earth in the same orbit. Emerging about 15 minutes apart, the CMEs quickly merged into one shock wave of charged particles that washed over the probe’s sensors just 18.6 hours later (the “snowstorm” of particles seen late in this video), researchers report online today in Nature Communications. Behind the shock wave, charged particles raced along at about 2250 kilometers per second—five times their normal speed at Earth’s distance from the sun—and the magnetic field strength there was more than 10 times that normally seen at Earth’s orbit. If pointed in our direction, such a combination would have produced the strongest geomagnetic storm to have struck Earth in history and could have knocked out satellites and earthbound power grids, researchers say. Fortunately, the event was a bit of a fluke, as it erupted into a region of space where the solar wind and the magnetic field had been weakened by a solar flare 4 days earlier. The observations of these CMEs will help scientists better model space weather and predict potentially calamitous solar storms.(Video credit: Ying Liu)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more


How Feminine Is Your Girlfriend’s Face?

first_imgGuys, do you prefer more feminine faces? If so, chances are you grew up in a relatively healthy place. New research suggests that men raised in countries with higher average lifespans and lower child mortality more strongly prefer women with softer features than do men raised in less healthy nations. The finding bolsters the idea that years of human evolution have made men attracted to faces that could help them survive.  Previous studies have found that women living in harsher conditions—such as communities with high homicide rates and low income—are more inclined to find more masculine men attractive. Urszula Marcinkowska, a biologist at the University of Turku in Finland, and her colleagues wanted to know whether culture also influenced males’ preferences for females, or whether men judged females in a more universal way.Using an online survey conducted in 16 different languages, the researchers presented 1972 heterosexual males between the ages of 18 and 24 from 28 different countries with 20 pairs of Caucasian female faces. Each pair contained one face with more feminine traits—such as larger eyes, fuller lips, and a less angular jaw—as well as a more androgynous face, with thinner lips and a wider chin. Participants were asked to select which face in each pair they found more sexually attractive.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)While men across all cultures generally preferred a more feminine face, the strength of that preference varied between countries. The difference couldn’t be explained by the ratio of men to women in a country, its gross national income, or the race of the participants, but it did correlate with the national health index of the men’s countries—a measure of overall well-being. Those from countries like Japan, with high national health index scores, chose the more feminine face more than three-quarters of the time, the authors report online today in Biology Letters. Men from countries such as Nepal, which has a lower health rating, selected the more feminine face in only slightly more than half of the cases, on average.“Women with more feminine features have, in the past, been found to be less socially dominant and less effective at competing for resources,” Marcinkowska says. Over thousands of years, she says, men may have evolved to choose less feminine women in harsher conditions to give them an edge at survival. One possible mechanism mediating this preference is altered testosterone levels; men raised in environments with frequent diseases and germ exposure tend to have lower testosterone levels through adulthood, because testosterone can handicap immune function. And men with high testosterone levels, previous studies have found, prefer more feminine women.“Unfortunately we couldn’t measure participants’ testosterone levels in this study,” Marcinkowska says. “However, I think this explanation is very plausible.”The conclusions “seem reasonable,” says Anthony Little, a psychology researcher at the University of Stirling in the United Kingdom who was not involved in the new work. But he also points out that separate studies have shown that recent pathogen exposure can increase a male’s preference for femininity, a slightly contradictory finding. “Future work can perhaps tease out whether different mechanisms are at play in driving these different effects.” Marcinkowska next plans to look at additional characteristics of the countries included in the survey to see whether other differences may also be linked to the face preferences. She hopes the results add to the collection of data on how people use faces to judge others, and how these preferences may have evolved.last_img read more


Plan for U.S. biomedical policy reforms not yet ready for prime time

first_imgGraduate training is seen as a crown jewel of U.S. higher education. University of Southern Mississippi/Van Arnold They probably should have known better, admits Harold Varmus, one of the authors of a controversial proposal this spring to correct the “systemic flaws” affecting U.S. biomedical research. But he and two of the other co-authors acknowledged Friday that one aspect of their call to arms was flawed, namely, that the community was close to agreeing on how to deal with the complex problems that affect training and funding. “We were naive,” said Varmus, director of the National Cancer Institute, after a presentation to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). “We were hoping to pick off some low-hanging fruit.”But that fruit isn’t ripe yet, he and Princeton University’s President Emerita Shirley Tilghman and Harvard Medical School’s Marc Kirschner told PCAST. The council had invited the four authors (Bruce Alberts, the former editor of Science, was unable to attend) because of the furor their article had raised within the biomedical community, explained PCAST Co-Chair Eric Lander.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Shortly after the article appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in April, a members-only session held on the last morning of the academy’s annual meeting generated a “very heated” discussion, Varmus said. A follow-up meeting of community leaders sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute convinced the authors that they were far from achieving the consensus they wanted before holding a national gathering to come up with a list of solutions.“So we’ve decided to take more time,” Varmus explained. He and others said the next step would be to assemble a larger and more representative group—in particular with early-career scientists—to continue discussing the issues, which cover everything from graduate training and university oversight of research to federal grants management and partnerships with industry.The system has worked well for a long time, Tilghman explained, and nobody wants to do something that might have unintended negative consequences. “We are very sensitive to the principle of ‘First, do no harm.’ ”Put succinctly, Tilghman described the problem as “too many people chasing too little money.” And after the trio presented their views on what factors are putting stress on the system and what might be done to alleviate it, Lander, a biologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, got to the heart of the matter.“You’ve suggested a lot of reasons for the current situation,” he said. But in the absence of hard evidence to back up their assertions, he noted, it’s very difficult to know which remedies might solve the problem and which might make it worse.“That’s exactly the question that I would have asked us,” Tilghman confessed. “There’s a consensus that the current system is at risk for not producing the best science. But there’s little consensus on what to do to make it better.”One reason, Lander hinted, may be the large number of unproven—and possibly untestable—hypotheses about the crisis that have become accepted wisdom. The article asserted, for example, that the current “hypercompetitive system” is driving away the best students and “making it difficult for seasoned investigators to produce their best work.” The article also stated that low success rates have spawned “conservative, short-term thinking” throughout the community, a problem compounded, the authors say, by the fact that “time for reflection is a disappearing luxury.”Another hugely controversial issue is whether some type of “birth control” is needed to ease the intense competition for research funding and academic positions. The phrase usually applies to limiting the number of graduate students. But biologist Jo Handelsman, associate director for science at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and a participant at the Hughes meeting, said that emphasis may be inappropriate.“I think that graduate education is the pinnacle of what we do in education in the United States,” said Handelsman, on leave from Yale University. “And I don’t think there’s anything wrong with unleashing a large group of trained Ph.D.s. The question is what they do after graduation.”Her suggestion: Make sure that universities “train students just as rigorously” for careers outside academia as is now done to prepare them for academic careers. “The answer is not limiting the number of graduate students, but perhaps limiting the number of PIs,” Handelsman remarked after the meeting.Although nothing was resolved during the 75-minute discussion, one of Tilghman’s comments midway through it captured the tenor. “We don’t know what to do, and we’re open to your suggestions,” she said. “But I do know one thing: If we go home and do nothing, the problem will just get worse.”last_img read more