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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Legal & compliance The Philippines’ Central Bank and Anti-Money Laundering Council (AMLC) are investigating the potential economic impact of curtailing offshore gaming in the country, amid growing pressure from China to clamp down on the industry. Legal & compliance Philippines probes economic impact of offshore industry Regions: Asia Philippines 28th August 2019 | By contenteditor The Philippines’ Central Bank and Anti-Money Laundering Council (AMLC) are investigating the potential economic impact of curtailing offshore gaming in the country, amid growing pressure from China to clamp down on the industry.Benjamin Diokno, who is the bank’s governor and also chair of the AMLC, said that the probe into Philippine offshore gaming operators (POGOs) had started before China called for the Philippines to ban all forms of online gaming last week.Earlier this month, the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR) suspended the award of licences to POGOs until at least the end of this year, citing concerns over illegal operations and security.“I already asked the AMLC team plus our financial stability team as to the impact of, for example, discontinuing the POGOs in the Philippines,” said Diokno, according to the Philippine Star newspaper.“What is the impact on real estate and the economy? We are looking at the economic risks of having POGOs here. One of our mandates is financial stability.”Diokno did not give a deadline for a conclusion of the investigation. The AMLC includes the commissioners of the country’s Insurance Commission, and also the Securities and Exchange Commission.China has been ramping up the pressure on neighbouring countries to clamp down on online gambling, which it believes illegally targets Chinese nationals, with Cambodia also having halted the award of online gambling licences this month.Just days before PAGCOR’s suspension of POGO licences, a Chinese embassy spokesperson in the Philippines warned the Philippines to adopt “concrete and effective measures to prevent and punish the Philippine casinos, POGOs and other forms of gambling entities for their illegal employment of Chinese citizens and crack down related crimes that hurt the Chinese citizens”.PAGCOR has since played down the impact of POGOs on Chinese citizens, although the Philippine Star reported that POGOs employ 130,000 Chinese nationals. Tags: Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more


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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Desert Shark by Fantasma Games Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Casino & games 11th February 2020 | By Aaron Noy Desert Shark is the latest offering from Fantasma Games.A 5×4 reel slot that will take you the whole way to the East where a mythical ocean of sand lies, and whereupon fiery dunes great ships sail and giant creatures swim.Desert Shark has a theme that you never have seen before and it´s also packed with unique features as, Swim Swim feature, Wild feature, Dynamite Wild feature, and a Scatter feature.You can learn more about this slot here!If you are looking to review this game for your affiliate site, you can download the affiliate pack with all the info and creative from First Look Games here! Topics: Casino & games Slots Desert Shark is the latest offering from Fantasma Games. A 5×4 reel slot that will take you the whole way to the East where a mythical ocean of sand lies, and whereupon fiery dunes great ships sail and giant creatures swim. Email Addresslast_img read more


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first_imgRHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2016 interim results for the half year.For more information about RHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the RHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: RHT Holding Ltd (RHT.mu)  2016 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileRHT Holding Limited provides public transport services in Mauritius. The company has since diversified its service provision into real estate and property services as well as computer and general technological property services. RHT Holding Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius’ Development Enterprise Market.last_img


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first_imgJurors at the International Tribunal on U.S. Colonial Crimes in Puerto Rico, Oct. 27 in New York.“The people of Puerto Rico need and deserve plentiful good jobs, a dynamic and prosperous economy, affordable and reliable electricity, and an efficient and responsive public sector.” That is how the summary of the draft of the Fiscal Control Board’s new fiscal plan for Puerto Rico begins — like a fairy tale. Titled “Restoring Growth and Prosperity” and dated Oct. 23, it was published on the Board’s (called Junta in Puerto Rico) website, oversightboard.pr.gov.But this tale, conceived by armies of consultants and law firms, mostly based in the United States, who charge millions to people who “deserve a good economy,” reveals a cruel austerity process that would destroy the Puerto Rican people’s very future.Enclosed in air-conditioned offices, these consultants add and subtract the future of a people, expressed in multicolored graphics representing human lives reduced to simple numbers, who have to adjust to the Junta’s Machiavellian projections.This is how the consultants determine, for example, that the University of Puerto Rico — the only public higher education entity in the archipelago and the institution that prepares its future — will be dismembered, rendered useless and ultimately destroyed. The only goal is to save money that the consultants will eventually use to pay the bondholders of the massive public debt of $74 billion.Founded in 1903, the UPR has great international prestige. It has provided the intellectual and scientific support for advances made in the colony despite the obstacles of colonization. The UPR is where U.S. agencies such as NASA recruit scientists for their projects; this brain drain is one more way of stealing from the people who subsidize these studies in the hope of achieving a more promising future.Not only does the UPR prepare professionals for the development of the country, it is also an important source of critical thinking and active resistance against the neoliberal policies that for several decades the local government, at the behest of its colonizing master, has tried to implement in Puerto Rico.UPR promotes social justiceThe UPR has also been a leveling agent of social justice, where the students with the least money can achieve their dreams of university studies without the heavy debt that their peers carry in the United States.Now that will change if the Fiscal Control Board gets its way. Part of its plan is to increase tuition. In the next academic year, each credit will cost $115, an increase of $57. For students who can barely pay for their studies now, and who benefit from self-managed projects such as Community Cafeterias (Comedores Sociales), this increase will mean that continuing their studies will be impossible.The Community Cafeterias emerged as a voluntary initiative of students who saw that many of their peers did not have enough money to maintain adequate nutrition. In these cafeterias the students pay what they can and thus have at least one guaranteed hot meal a day.Besides increasing the cost per credit, the austerity measure for the UPR projects a decrease in the payroll of both teaching and nonteaching employees, a decrease in their pensions, the elimination of the Christmas bonus, an adjustment in payments for sick days, and a cut in the university’s contribution to the medical plan. These measures add up to impoverishing the working class of the UPR and its professors, leading them to a poor and insecure old age.Not content with these devastating plans, the dictatorial Junta proposes the elimination of jobs and the reduction of the number of students and of university campuses.Currently, the UPR consists of 11 campuses distributed throughout the island, including the Medical Sciences campus. The restructuring proposal contemplates the conglomeration by 2023 of the 11 campuses into three groups, plus the Medical Sciences campus. Within this plan, there would also be the anarchic elimination of subjects and specialties.This reorganization, like all measures outlined by the Junta, has been put together without considering the needs of the people, without public hearings, and by ignoring proposals for savings by Puerto Rican specialists. The only criteria has been to pay the bondholders by economizing through elimination of servicesAll these measures will have the effect of preventing people’s access to higher studies. Only the wealthiest class will be able to take advantage of them. Poverty will deepen at all levels.If we add the impact of closing public schools — generally those that served the poorest sectors and those in the mountains — the result is that people with no possibility of education at any level, poor and desperate, will seek flight as refugees to the United States, increasing the depopulation of Puerto Rico.Its Department of Education is now under the control of a U.S. mercenary, Secretary of Education Julia Keleher. Although not all the plans have yet been put into practice, already Keleher has, literally, blood on her hands. A few days ago, a teacher committed suicide as a result of the harassment and anarchic “educational” reforms imposed by the department.Tribunal on U.S. Colonial Crimes against Puerto RicoA portion of the International Tribunal on U.S. Colonial Crimes against Puerto Rico, held in New York City on Oct. 27, featured Puerto Ricans presenting testimonies on the state of the economy.National hero Rafael Cancel Miranda discussed the dictatorial role of the Junta. After mentioning some of the dictators imposed by the U.S., like Batista in Cuba, Trujillo in the Dominican Republic and Pinochet in Chile, he said that in Puerto Rico, the U.S. imposed not just one dictator, but a dictatorial board composed of seven members.Economist Dr. Martha Quiñones Domínguez, who is also a UPR professor and president of Women Economists, presented a magnificent exposition of how U.S. colonial power in PR has been expressed in successive laws that have consolidated the legal framework for domination over the people. This includes military domination, the usurpation of land and the imposition of decisions against the welfare of the people, up to the current forced bankruptcy.The latest of these laws is PROMESA, approved in 2016 by the U.S. Congress during President Barack Obama’s administration. This law established the dictatorial Junta. Dr. Quiñones showed how during the 1970s, when there was a resurgence of the independence movement, the U.S. created a dependency through federal “aid” to defeat anti-colonial resistance.Rolando Emmanuelli Jiménez, an expert on the PROMESA Law and author of the book on the topic, testified on why it was imposed. Given the colonial condition of PR, the law expedites wealth extraction, the goal of U.S. colonial rule. He explained how Puerto Rico went bankrupt: “It cannot meet the levels of indebtedness it had to incur in order to subsidize direct foreign investment by United States investors.“Puerto Rico built roads, prepared engineers, employees, gave subsidies, gave tax exemptions based on indebtedness, and these companies extract profits of the order of $34 billion annually that are taken from PR with no contributions. Therefore, this imbalance where the government has to borrow to invest in roads, in services for this type of investment. …“That imbalance caused the colony to collapse and led to creating this Junta; but the problem with this Junta is not only that it imposes austerity measures to pay the creditors of the bonds. It also destroyed the limited scope of local government the U.S. Congress delegated to Puerto Rico based on Law 600 of the federal Congress of 1952 that allowed PR to establish a constitution.”Odious debtFor his part, José Nicolás Medina Fuentes, an expert on odious debt and author of the book on it, testified about how the “problem of the odious colonial-territorial public debt that is being imposed on the people of Puerto Rico is of a political character.“Odious debt is a recognized legal concept … it is a debt or a loan contract that occurs in a series of situations of great injustice for the affected populations. … [A]n emblematic example of odious debt is the Cuban public debt to Spain [as of 1898]. … In the Treaty of Paris in … the deliberations of the Spanish commissions and the U.S. commission prior to the signing of the Treaty of Paris, one of the most controversial judgments during those negotiations was the issue of Cuba’s colonial debt.“On the one hand, the Spanish commissioners claimed that if they were going to cede some possessions, if they were going to renounce sovereignty over Cuba, then Cuba’s territorial public debt had to be assumed by the U.S. or by the Cuban people. And the U.S. commissioners were emphatic in saying that this debt was not a debt of the Cuban territorial treasury, but a debt of the Spanish treasury. … In a colonial relationship, the public debt is the responsibility of the colonial power.“That was the solution of the Cuban public debt in the Treaty of Paris.”Therefore, the PR debt is the responsibility of the U.S. colonial power.Tribunal verdict The verdict of the Oct. 27 Tribunal regarding the economy of PR concluded with the following points:That this colonial imposition, through the so-called Fiscal Control Board, is directly responsible for the disastrous conditions that still exist in Puerto Rico more than a year after Hurricane Maria. U.S. corporations and banks, under the pretext of helping with reconstruction, have expropriated billions of dollars from the treasury, creating a humanitarian crisis.That this colonial imposition has used the hurricane as a pretext to promote the U.S. government’s deep-rooted neoliberal and right-wing policies to privatize fundamental social services and destroy labor movements, especially in the fields of education and electricity.And that the U.S. government imposed protocols that allowed and encouraged the corporate plundering of Puerto Rico’s natural resources and wealth, and the exploitation of Puerto Rican labor, promoting the myth and legend that Puerto Rico owes something to the U.S. government; in fact, the U.S. government and U.S. corporations owe an extraordinary debt to the people of Puerto Rico.The Tribunal’s demands on the U.S. government were three:The government of the United States acknowledges and apologizes for the aforementioned crimes against the Puerto Rican people.The United States surrenders all property and power taken by force from the Puerto Rican people.The United States pays reparations to the victims of the crime of colonialism.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more


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first_imgEquestrian earns last seed in NCEA team bracket Twitter Women’s golf heads to Oklahoma for chance at first Big 12 title Facebook + posts Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Branson Nelson Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Linkedin A COVID-19 Charles Schwab Challenge ReddIt Iqbal leads women’s golf to fourth-place finish at Big 12 Tournament Twittercenter_img Director of Volleyball Jill Kramer announces addition of two transfers (Photo courtesy of gofrogs.com). Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ TAGSteam breakdown World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ printFollowing the success of TCU’s progression to the second round of the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2009, Director of Volleyball Jill Kramer announced more good news on Wednesday for their upcoming season. The Horned Frogs will be adding Lexi MacLean from Arizona State and Mykah Wilson out of Long Beach State to the 2017 roster.Both players will have two years of eligibility remaining. MacLean and Wilson will be eligible for the 2017 season.Lexi MacLean is a 6-foot-2 outside hitter who will be making a return to DFW. She was a four-time letter winner and two-time captain at Frisco Centennial High School just outside of Dallas.Lexi Maclean (Photo/Sharon Ellman)MacLean was a valued asset for the Sun Devils, as she ranked fifth on the team with 200 kills in 84 sets during the 2016 season. During her first season in 2015, MacLean appeared in half of her team’s matches, tallying 58 sets over 16 matches. In her two seasons at ASU, MacLean collected 280 kills.“Lexi is an explosive and dynamic player with an intense and exuberant personality on and off the court,” Kramer said about Maclean. Beyond her court prowess, Kramer said, “She’s a giver and I can already tell she likes to bring out the best in everyone around her.”Mykah Wilson is a 5-foot-11 libero and defensive specialist who will also be returning home to the Metroplex. Wilson was an All-State selection and District Defensive Player of the Year at Southlake Carroll High School in her senior year.Mykah Wilson (Photo/Sharon Ellman)Wilson was a prominent member of the Long Beach State team, playing in 192 sets over 51 matches while recording 14 starts, in two seasons.During her time at LBSU, Wilson picked up 552 digs, an average of 2.88 digs per set.Kramer and Wilson’s relationship is not a new one. “I’ve known Mykah for a while and am confident she will add to the culture of our program in a positive way,” Kramer said. In addition to Wilson being a new member of the indoor team, Kramer said, “We expect her to contribute on the beach team in future years, as she played beach volleyball at Long Beach as well.” ReddIt Branson is a junior journalism major from Fort Worth, Texas. He enjoys writing about all sports and plans to go to law school after graduation. Previous articleWomen’s Tennis falls short in match with No. 5 Oklahoma StateNext articleGreek Village construction ahead of schedule Branson Nelson RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Linkedin Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/last_img read more


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first_img “Jean Lake was schooled in the simple beauties of primitive life and those who lived close to the earth,” Berry said.“Through her eyes, even the smallest details of the simple life were not overlooked, whether it was a child’s tire swing in the grassless shanty yard or the family in the big house.“Jean didn’t think that she had to go elsewhere looking for things to paint. She stayed home and found things to paint that most often went unnoticed by others. Those paintings are a great contribution to the history of the rural South and that means so much to us.” Sponsored Content Berry said that many artists limit their focus but Lake painted across the board.“She was as good a portrait artist as she was a landscape or still life artist,” she said.Lake found a charm in the fast-fading scenes of the rural South. Her pictures are nostalgic reminders of an era how quickly passing.During summers spent at the beach, Lake found raw beauty in primitive places that had not been overtaken by the modern world. Latest Stories Published 11:00 pm Tuesday, April 16, 2013 Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits By Jaine Treadwell Jean Lake, Alice Thornton: Artists of ‘Note’ Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Troy native Jean Lake and city transplant, Alice Thornton, are two of the deceased artists featured on the Troy Arts Council Auxiliary’s note card collection that will be on sale at TroyFest on April 27 and 28 on the square in downtown Troy.The artwork of Lake and Thornton focused on the treasurers that lie among the souvenirs of memory, said Susan Berry, co-coordinator of the Auxiliary’s note card project.Lake had no formal art training but was rather a student of her homeland and the people who inhabited it. Skip Email the author Book Nook to reopen Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Print Article You Might Like Child Nutrition Program funding in question The Pike County Board of Education approved Monday the request of the Child Nutrition Program (CNP) to provide lunch as… read more “She could just as easily capture the character of an old sea captain or child hunting shells on the sandy beach as she could of the character of family life in a rural shanty,” Berry said,Sensitivity to a child saddened by the death of bird, respect for the good simple folk, the ephemeral light of a glow worm at evening showed Lake’s ability to mirror on canvas a wide range of activity and emotion.“Her subjects were always treated with affection,” Berry said. “Those who are privileged to have an original Jean Lake painting have treasures in their homes.”Lake’s painting of a rural shanty was chosen for the TAC Auxiliary’s note cards because it is representative of the scenes that she wanted to capture before they faded into the past.Alice Thornton came to Troy to be an art professor at Troy State College. Her husband died at an early age and she became the sole breadwinner for her family. The story of Thornton traveling around Oklahoma with a cow tied to the bumper of her car so that she would have milk for her children carved the image of Thornton as a strong, fiercely independent woman.“She was a well-trained artist and she had the skills to reproduce an image exactly as it was. But, she didn’t do that,” Berry said. “Her artwork was expressive of good times and hard times. She taught her students about art and how to express themselves through their art. But she also taught them about life and how to live it and how to cope when life throws you a curve. She spoke from experience.”The painting that was selected as representative of Thornton’s artwork is a pen and ink and watercolor of a spinning wheel.“For years, Alice was known at the Pike Pioneer Museum as the expert on spinning,” Berry said. “Not only is the painting a wonderful example of Alice’s remarkable talent, it’s also her.”Thornton’s daughter, Pat Duke, said her mother was interested in spinning and weaving.“My dad was an industrial arts professor and, one year, he made Mother a loom for her birthday but he died before her birthday,” Duke said.“When we were moving from Oklahoma to Arkansas, mother found the loom in the attic. It was in a bundle but it was labeled. She put the loom together and that put her on the road to spinning and weaving.”Duke chose her mother’s painting of the spinning wheel for the cover of the program at her funeral.“The painting is a wonderful tribute to Alice and to all that she meant to the arts in Troy and far beyond,” Berry said. 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first_imgiStock(BOGALUSA, La.) — A 12-year-old girl who was abducted from a hospital room by her armed grandmother has been found unharmed.Evelyn Miller, 66, was arrested by the Washington Parish Sheriff’s Office at a hotel in Bogalusa, Louisiana, and her granddaughter, Adreana Miller, 12, was found with her after Evelyn Miller allegedly took Adreana from Ochsner Hospital at approximately 5 p.m. on Valentine’s Day.Authorities say that Evelyn Miller entered Adreana’s hospital room in an attempt to remove her from the hospital but when hospital staff intervened and tried to stop her she allegedly pulled out a gun and pointed it at them.“In making her escape from the location, she pushed one nurse to the ground and struck a security guard with her vehicle,” said the Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office in a press release on social media. “No one was physically injured.”Police obtained a warrant for the arrest of Evelyn Miller after the incident for charges of simple kidnapping, five counts of aggravated assault with a firearm, two counts of simple battery, and violation of a firearm-free zone.Miller fled with Adreana from Ochsner Hospital in a 2019 Toyota Sienna which was recovered a short time later.Miller and her granddaughter were located approximately 24 hours later at a hotel in Bogalusa, Louisiana, about 70 miles north of the New Orleans hospital she was taken from.“We extend our appreciation to our partners in law enforcement who assisted with this investigation, including the Louisiana State Police and the Washington Parish Sheriff’s Office, and to our local media and members of the public who shared the information about the incident and helped us bring it to a swift closure,” said Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office.While the girl was the subject of a statewide “child endangerment alert,” authorities said, it is currently unclear what Miller’s motivations were in taking her granddaughter. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more


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first_imgThree of the female inmates who walked away from Pierre Cmty. Work Center are in custody on Crow Creek Reservation; state is working with tribe to have inmates Flute, Wakeman and Miller returned to state custody.— South Dakota DOC (@SouthDakotaDOC) March 24, 2020Meanwhile, a manhunt continued in the state of Washington for six inmates who escaped on Monday evening from the Yakima County Jail. The at-large escapees were among 14 who fled the jail in downtown Yakima after using a table to break down an exit door and then scaling a fence, according to Yakima County Sheriff Robert Udell.The U.S. Marshals Service is offering rewards of up to $1,000 for information leading to the arrests of the escaped Yakima jail inmates.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Gatsi/iStock(PIERRE, S.D.) — A search continued in South Dakota on Wednesday for five inmates who escaped along with four others from a minimum-security women’s penitentiary on the same day a prisoner tested positive for the novel coronavirus, officials said.The breakout at the Pierre Community Work Center took place around 8:43 p.m. on Monday, according to South Dakota Department of Corrections officials. Three of the escapees were captured Tuesday on the nearby Crow Creek Indian Reservation and one was caught in Rapid City, about 170 miles west of Pierre, officials said.South Dakota Gov. Kristie Noem told reporters that the inmate captured in Rapid City is being tested for coronavirus.The women, who were all housed in the same annex, left the non-secure correctional facility without authorization via an exterior door, corrections officials said in a statement.“Women’s Prison staff began escape procedures and law enforcement was notified. The South Dakota Highway Patrol aircraft was used to assist ground operations in its search for the inmates,” according to a statement from corrections officials.All the escapees were serving sentences for low-level offenses, including simple assault, forgery, robbery and possession of controlled substances, officials said.The prisoners left the facility on the same day officials announced that an inmate at the Pierre Community Work Center had tested positive for coronavirus. The infected inmate, the first in the South Dakota prison system to test positive for the virus, was immediately placed in isolation to protect other inmates, officials said.It was not immediately clear if the diagnosis prompted the prisoners to bolt.last_img read more


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first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Recognised as the largest and most prestigious event of its kind, theRecruitment Advertising Awards reward the brightest people and best recruitmentadvertising in the business. Here the judges discuss this year’s standard ofentries and what they look for in a winnerThe standard of entries this year is excellent. Particularly in light of theeconomic downturn in the second half of 2001,” says Paul Stafford,managing director of advertising agency Stafford Long & Partners andchairman of the judges at this year’s Recruitment Advertising Awards. “I had suspected it might not be the case as certain sectors, such astelecoms, are currently laying people off rather than hiring. It has been apleasant surprise to find so much originality. The agencies have done extremelywell and achieved a very high standard.” At a time where business is battening down the hatches in all departments,praise like this speaks volumes. And this view isn’t just espoused by Stafford either. After three days ofscrutinising 650 entries in 17 different categories, the consensus among RADjudges is that this year signals a creative triumph over economic adversity. Some even believe the economic conditions are inspiring advertisers to takerisks that would never be allowed in more affluent circumstances. Perhaps thisconfirms that necessity is the mother of invention after all. Julia Underwood, One2One recruitment manager, says: “A lot of theagencies have worked hard at finding new angles on recruitment and a lot ofentries are not just based on paper advertising. “There are some brilliant, innovative ideas that really asked thecompany to put its head on the block.” And this is despite client briefsthat were frequently tailored for rudimentary approaches that have been triedand tested countless times before. Samantha Diamond, managing director of Ward Diamond Advertising, says:”There are so many restrictions on recruitment advertisers at the moment.When people think laterally around the problems and arrive at something that isoriginal and attracts the right people – that’s when the ‘wow’ factor comesinto it.” While it is almost impossible to define ‘wow’ without moving into the realmsof ‘gut feeling’ and ‘hairs standing on the back of the neck’, this providedthe defining line between a shortlisted entry and one that was not takenfurther by the judges. The judges focused on the key concept of targeting – most notably, how wellthe advertisements found the right audience, enticed people to apply and spokea language they understood. Other key factors were cost effectiveness and overall success in finding theright candidates for the right jobs. Ewan McCulloch, HR controller of Comet Group, says: “For me, whatevermedia is used has to be sufficiently creative so that it reaches people in anew and imaginative way. But it is completely useless unless it drives responseand attracts the individuals that are needed.” Entries were rated on effectiveness, budget, typography, style, approach andlevel of creativity. The scores were then used to produce a shortlist and, eventually,a winner in each category. The process has been a learning experience for the judges. Mandy Lingard,development manager at HSBC bank, says: “Looking at the campaigns it isinteresting to see how very different they all are. It is a real treat to seesuch a variety of work. You don’t often get to appreciate the full range ofrecruitment advertising and the high quality work that goes into it all.” Entries include new media and old, audio and visual and newspaperadvertising. But within all of them the judges noticed a trend towardsheadline- and copy-driven ads, as opposed to striking visual efforts. Several judges noted a development of an increasingly technological approachto recruitment advertising, including web advertising. Today, it is often thecase that newspapers are used to attract a candidate’s interest. If they wantto find out more information they then have to locate the relevant website. McCulloch says: “Recruitment advertising is moving on. Because oneperson can now access information from so many different media, recruiters arebecoming more creative. “Thanks to websites and e-cards people no longer have to take up inchesof newspaper describing a job. People can find out about vacancies in so manyother ways.” Overall, originality has been the key criteria for the judges. Underwoodsays: “I was looking for the best work of the year – something thatcompanies and agencies can both see as a new exciting idea – a new angle onattracting people to positions.” Diamond agrees. “I was really looking for advertising where people haveapproached the process in an original way. There are a few that really standout as so original – those were the ones that I really wanted to reward.” The Recruitment Advertising awards will be held on 17 January at the GreatRoom, Grosvenor House, London.  For moreinformation see www.radawards.com Related posts:No related photos. Creativity triumphsOn 15 Jan 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more


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first_imgMacrozooplankton are an important link between higher and lower trophic levels in the oceans. They serve as the primary food for fish, reptiles, birds and mammals in some regions, and play a role in the export of carbon from the surface to the intermediate and deep ocean. Little, however, is known of their global distribution and biomass. Here we compiled a dataset of macrozooplankton abundance and biomass observations for the global ocean from a collection of four datasets. We harmonise the data to common units, calculate additional carbon biomass where possible, and bin the dataset in a global 1 × 1 degree grid. This dataset is part of a wider effort to provide a global picture of carbon biomass data for key plankton functional types, in particular to support the development of marine ecosystem models. Over 387 700 abundance data and 1330 carbon biomass data have been collected from pre-existing datasets. A further 34 938 abundance data were converted to carbon biomass data using species-specific length frequencies or using species-specific abundance to carbon biomass data. Depth-integrated values are used to calculate known epipelagic macrozooplankton biomass concentrations and global biomass. Global macrozooplankton biomass, to a depth of 350 m, has a mean of 8.4 μg C L−1, median of 0.2 μg C L−1 and a standard deviation of 63.5 μg C L−1. The global annual average estimate of macrozooplankton biomass in the top 350 m, based on the median value, is 0.02 Pg C. There are, however, limitations on the dataset; abundance observations have good coverage except in the South Pacific mid-latitudes, but biomass observation coverage is only good at high latitudes. Biomass is restricted to data that is originally given in carbon or to data that can be converted from abundance to carbon. Carbon conversions from abundance are restricted by the lack of information on the size of the organism and/or the absence of taxonomic information. Distribution patterns of global macrozooplankton biomass and statistical information about biomass concentrations may be used to validate biogeochemical and plankton functional type models.last_img read more


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