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Category: dhkjksnd

first_img whatsapp whatsapp PUB group Greene King has secured a new five year £400m revolving credit facility with its banking partners to bankroll expansion.This replaces the existing £400m facility, which was due to expire in April 2012.The company said in a statement: “This new facility gives Greene King continued financial flexibility and helps underpin the ongoing delivery of our retail expansion and overall growth strategy.” It plans to grow its managed pubs and restaurants business to about 1,100 outlets from 900 currently in the next five years. Show Comments ▼ Share Greene King in new debt deal center_img Tags: NULL Monday 4 April 2011 7:42 pm by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastMoneyPailShe Was Famous, Now She Works In {State}MoneyPailBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesDrivepedia20 Of The Most Underrated Vintage CarsDrivepediaZen HeraldThe Truth About Why ’40s Actor John Wayne Didn’t Serve In WWII Has Come To LightZen HeraldBetterBeDrones Capture Images No One Was Suppose to SeeBetterBeElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite Herald KCS-content More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com‘The Love Boat’ captain Gavin MacLeod dies at 90nypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comlast_img read more


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first_imgCAL Bank Limited (CAL.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2015 annual report.For more information about CAL Bank Limited (CAL.gh) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the CAL Bank Limited (CAL.gh) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: CAL Bank Limited (CAL.gh)  2015 annual report.Company ProfileCAL Bank Limited is a leading financial institution in Ghana offering products and services for the investment, corporate and retail banking sectors, as well as custodial, treasury, security brokerage, fund management and asset management services. The banking group underwrites securities and provides financial solutions for corporate finance operations, loan syndications and securities portfolio management, acquisitions and mergers, acceptance of bills of exchange, bullion dealings, export trade development and financing, hire-purchase finance and leasing. CAL Bank Limited provide a counseling and financing service for industrial, agricultural, mining, services and commercial ventures. The financial institution was founded in 1990 and is based in Accra, Ghana. CAL Bank Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more


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first_imgZB Financial Holdings Limited (ZBFH.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2018 interim results for the half year.For more information about ZB Financial Holdings Limited (ZBFH.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the ZB Financial Holdings Limited (ZBFH.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: ZB Financial Holdings Limited (ZBFH.zw)  2018 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileZB Financial Holdings Limited provides financial solutions to the commercial and merchant banking sector in Zimbabwe, as well as retail banking services, insurance operations and strategic investments. Known as Zimbank, the company services its clients through a nationwide footprint of branches in major towns and cities in Zimbabwe and electronic delivery channels. The Insurance division provides structured insurance products for short- and long-term insurance; and the Strategic Investment division offers shared services which include risk management, compliance and human resources, and investments in property holdings and sub-sectors of the financial sector. ZB Financial Holdings Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more


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first_img Comments are closed. By Pat McCaughanPosted Mar 22, 2016 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Power of public witness: Churches prepare to take the Passion outdoors This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Margaret Raigins says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Robert Yearwood, sexton of Trinity Church, carried the cross through the streets of Boston as area Christians remembered Jesus’ suffering with a march through the city on Good Friday 2015. The Rev. Rainey Dankel, also of Trinity, was one of the organizers of the “Stations of the City.” Photo: Patricia Hurley[Episcopal News Service] This Good Friday, for the Rev. Scott Slater and others in the Diocese of Maryland, Stations of the Cross will include a walk along Baltimore’s Route 40 corridor and stops to pray at places where gun violence has stolen lives.Elsewhere in the Episcopal Church, the ancient tradition of recalling Jesus’ path to the crucifixion also will be observed outdoors and in fresh and public ways.In Boston’s Copley Square, Matt Gin, 29, plans to be among a Trinity Church group who will use pantomime and tableaux to convey the depth of the Passion. “I’m portraying Jesus in the last five stations, the scary stations,” said Gin, in a recent interview with Episcopal News Service.And in Virginia, members of St. James’s Church’s young adult ministry will hike the stations on Holy Saturday, March 26, at Richmond’s Belle Isle, a popular spot for outdoor enthusiasts with powerful historical significance. The site of a prison camp for Union soldiers during the Civil War, it serves “as a powerful reminder that the work of reconciliation is not done yet,” according to the Rev. Carmen Germino, associate rector.Baltimore: An ‘unholy trinity’ of poverty, racism and violenceSlater, canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Maryland, said he’s driven through some areas of Baltimore many times “with the doors locked and the radio going” but wanted to walk the city and pray in the wake of riots that erupted after the death of Freddie Gray last year and the gun violence that continues to claim the lives of young African-Americans.Gray, 25, was arrested April 12, 2015, on a weapons charge in Baltimore. He suffered a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody and later died. His death sparked civil unrest. A judge declared a mistrial after jurors could not reach a verdict in the trial of the first of six police officers charged in Gray’s death.According to a 2012 U.S. Justice Department report, the Sandtown-Winchester/Harlem Park neighborhood where Gray lived is challenged by “a cycle of incarceration, poverty, and lost opportunity.”The report included some grim neighborhood realities: a $24,000 median household income from 2006-2012; a 51.8 percent unemployment rate; and a chronic high school absentee rate of nearly 50 percent. About one-third of the residential properties were vacant or abandoned.“The hopelessness (there) soaks into your bones. It’s palpable,” said Slater, who previously walked the area to plan this Friday’s observance. “Block after block of boarded-up houses and trash-strewn streets … you recognize it’s got to be tough to grow up here.”The 7-mile walk will encompass three Episcopal church sites and include ecumenical participants. Along the way, stops for prayer at 15 spots where young African-Americans have died in gun or other violence in the past year will challenge participants to face the grim reality of what “our bishop (Eugene Sutton) has called the unholy trinity of racism, poverty and violence,” Slater said.One stop is planned behind a gas station where “a young man was shot and killed. It’s a horrible place to die, a horrible place to live also,” he said. By seeing the names and places, Slater hopes to make both the circumstances of the contemporary lives and deaths and that of Jesus “much more real” to participants.“I’m hoping that the concept of walking through our own city and passing spots where real people with real names died violently, and praying for them will make the actual Good Friday experience of remembering Jesus a little more palpable.”The Rev. Ramelle McCall, 34, rector of St. Michael and All Angels Church in Baltimore, plans to join the prayer walk because he hopes to engage others “who have not seen extremely underprivileged areas of Baltimore.”“I felt like I was a Route 40 kid; I lived in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood” for several years while growing up, he told ENS.“It’s important to make a lot of people inside and outside the church aware of these communities that need help. I hope folks who do not live in Baltimore will see how the dynamics of socioeconomics, race and class – together – affect lives.”McCall said his church is less than five miles from where Gray was arrested. As the anniversary of Gray’s death approaches, McCall hopes efforts will continue “to see if we can build some relationships and see where that goes.”Slater agreed. He said there is “a real hunger for people from the diocese who don’t live in Baltimore city to do something tangible to connect with endemic problems in Baltimore.”McCall said he is looking forward to turning prayer to action. “The need has always been there, and I’m grateful that the diocese is really coordinating this event,” he said.“I would never have imagined that as a priest, as a black man, I would really be a part of a presumably diverse group of people that really has genuine care for these communities and really wants to see how the Spirit can work through all of us to be a real friend to these impoverished areas. That’s what I’m excited about.”At the same time, the walk will be a sobering reminder not only “that Jesus Christ died for us on this day … but that in parts of Baltimore, people may be seeing Good Friday all the time,” said McCall.“We’re trying to hold up, into the context of Good Friday, the unfortunate homicides that take place and the unfortunate loss of life that happens, and how we’re saddened by such death,” he added. At the same time, “we look to a future where maybe we can celebrate hope in the midst of a Good Friday where this violence is not constantly replayed.“We have the power to rewrite the narrative, so that this is not a Friday that we look at as lives lost, but as lives that will be saved in the near future.”Boston: Mime, tableaux, ‘Episcopal evangelism at its best’For members of Trinity Church, the challenge this Good Friday will be conveying the Passion in pantomime and tableaux, while juggling various roles as spectators, bystanders, hecklers and Jesus.Mary Davis is among the six church members who will take turns portraying Jesus during the last moments of his life in “a living Stations of the Cross” amid the sights and sounds of Boston’s bustling Copley Square.“We thought, ‘It’s a lot of weight to have one person be Jesus,’ ” said Davis. “We actually just walked it yesterday and it was very moving. It made me consider aspects of the story I never thought of before, like being inside the experience in a way that was pretty new. Just during the rehearsal, I found myself in tears several times.”The Rev. Rita Powell, Trinity’s associate rector for liturgy, organized the effort with assistance from Tony LoPresti, a New York theater professional, mime and friend of the Taizé community, who coached the actors.Workshops with LoPresti prepared them with the fundamentals of classic mime for the performance, which will begin on the steps of the church with the first station, in which Jesus is condemned to death. Accompanied by tambourine, drum and violin, and others reading Scripture, the actors will move to other corners of the square as they enact the stations.“It’s like an intersection between Stations of the Cross and the kind of more contemporary ‘stations of the city’ where important sites in the city are walked to and prayed. We are creating living stations of the cross using the liturgy from the (Episcopal Church’s) Book of Occasional Services,” Powell said.Amid the busy square, the performance will be a reminder, too, that “for a small group of people the crucifixion of Jesus was a really big deal, but most of the city was not moved by the event,” she said.Whether snow, rain or shine, the performance will go on as planned at 3:30 p.m. until the final station “where Jesus is stripped and crucified and died. That will happen in the fountain at Boylston Street and we will use the stone alcove on the front porch of the church.”For Gin, a Harvard University doctoral student who was baptized at last year’s Easter Vigil and will also be Jesus during the stations, that’s the scary part.“I have to say I am still not entirely comfortable with being Jesus in those five scenes and I think that’s good. I don’t think anyone should be comfortable with those scenes.”When Powell approached him to participate, Gin, an architectural historian, was intrigued by the blend of old tradition and new interpretation.Preparing for his various roles, of bystander, heckler, executioner and Jesus has “been a real challenge, trying to put myself not just in the story but in the mindset of all of these people. There’s a tendency to focus just on Jesus but all of the sudden you’re confronted with what was the guy thinking when he handed Jesus the cross. It’s been filled out for me in a new way.”Gin said he actually won’t be hanging on the cross in the same sense Jesus did; a special rig will support his body.  “There’s this weird physical tension where I look like I’m hanging from (the cross) but my body is supporting it.”At an earlier rehearsal, he realized “a beautiful tension in just that physicality. It’s so uncomfortable. And in a really honest way, I could see how painful and agonizing Jesus’ death actually was. That’s not something that people either like to think about or do think about. Even in our contemporary representations there’s the idea of the serene Christ on the cross. To actually be in that position takes it to a whole new level.”Also, doing it “in such a public place and public way implicates everyone, whether you’re passing by or ignoring it. That’s really powerful. Whether you’re a believer or not there’s something meaningful to be drawn not just from this performance but this story.”Davis agreed. “There’s this real joy in making this story come to life even though the story itself is one of intense suffering. That is generally how I feel in Holy Week. It’s really satisfying even though it’s really horrible to unearth that piece of our faith.”Powell said the event represents “Episcopal evangelism at its best. To take what we love most, the liturgical expression of what we think is important in the story and to bravely dare to tell that in public, simply has a power to it and a risk and an excitement to it that you can’t match any other way.”Richmond: ‘A powerful public witness’ amid stark remindersOn Holy Saturday, members of St. James’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, will sing, pray, and hike while recalling the last moments of Christ’s life on earth.The city’s popular Belle Isle Park and the James River will serve as a backdrop as members of the church’s Young Adult Ministry, who organized the hike, offer reflections at “stations” marked with artwork created by the Sunday school children.“It’s a wonderful, relaxed, inviting family atmosphere” yet offers reminders of the city’s challenges, said Danielle Dick, 40, who is planning to attend along with her 9-year-old son Aidan.Hikers enjoy the scenic beauty but also pass the crumbling ruins of former industrial plants. They also recall the island’s history as the site of a Civil War prison camp for Union soldiers. It serves as a reminder of how much the past “still has a profound impact on the present,” she said.The Rev. Carmen Germino agreed.“Initially, we chose Belle Isle (as a site for the first hike last year) because it is such a well-known and well-loved public park and outdoor place in Richmond. But, the more we got into it, we realized what an appropriate theological place it was … because at one time, Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy and we are very much still living out that legacy.”Recalling the park’s history “is a powerful reminder that the work of reconciliation in the city is not done yet and Holy Week can be a very powerful time to remember that.”Last year’s hike drew hundreds and “there was a joyful spirit about it which I think is appropriate for Holy Saturday, when we’ve come past Good Friday but we’re still not out of the darkness yet getting more joyful about Easter,” Germino said.“The stopping and starting, prayer and reflection is a reminder that the journey continues. It was a nice mix of experience and feeling, it helped the kids get excited about Easter.”Additionally, “it is a public witness in the middle of what is not usually a place of worship,” she said. The sheer physicality of the service appealed to those in from their early 20s to early 40s in the group.“As they were planning the liturgy, it made sense for it to be outdoors. The most powerful stations I’ve experienced are public ones, outside the walls of the church, as if I’m in Jerusalem, walking the Via Dolorosa.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 23, 2016 at 8:04 pm join us Judith! Saturday at 10:30 am. Meet near pedestrian bridge. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA March 23, 2016 at 10:59 am What a wonderful idea! Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Judith Wood says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (2) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Lent New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more


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first_imgCommittee ready to propose a ‘missionary budget for the Jesus Movement’ Program, Budget and Finance will explain its work in July 11 joint session TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 10, 2018 July 10, 2018 at 10:56 pm The more the Church pushes this “Jesus Movement” agenda of political engagement and wading into our nation’s culture wars, the more people will walk away. That budget is better spent feeding and caring for the poor, the needy, and the friendless than this. That budget may be better spent eliminating a hypocrisy of our church by fixing the gender pay gap that has long existed. That budget may be better spent at a local level in individual dioceses. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Andrew Poland says: Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing The members of the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance have spent long hours crafting their proposed 2019-2021 budget. They will present it to both houses of convention during a joint session on July 11. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service –Austin, Texas] Faced with a record number of resolutions, many of them asking for money, but also aided by a strong financial foundation, General Convention’s budget committee finished crunching numbers July 10 on the Episcopal Church’s 2019-2021 budget.“This is the missionary budget for the Jesus Movement in the Episcopal Church,” Maine Bishop Steve Lane, vice chair of the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance, told Episcopal News Service during an interview after the committee reached its goal of balancing the budget.The budget, with a bottom line of $133.8 million in both revenue and spending, is a plan “from a new kind of church” that has a “continued focus on evangelism, racial reconciliation and creation care,” Lane said. Convention set those three priorities during the last meeting of convention in 2015 at the urging of then-newly elected Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.According to Lane and PB&F chair Barbara Miles, deputy from the Diocese of Washington, $10 million is allocated across the budget for racial reconciliation work. Evangelism has $5.3 million to work with, and it is money allocated from anticipated income rather than the one-time draw on the church’s short-term reserves as it has been in the 2016-2018. There is also $1 million for care of creation.PB&F’s budget must be presented to a joint session of the houses of Bishops and Deputies no later than the third day before convention’s scheduled adjournment. That presentation is set for 2:15 p.m. CDT on July 11. To meet that deadline, the committee had to complete its work the day before. Once they receive the budget, the two houses debate and vote on it separately. Both houses must approve the same version of the budget, which takes effect at the beginning of 2019.PB&F uses the draft 2019-2021 triennium budget that Executive Council passed in January and legislation passed by or being considered by General Convention to create a final budget proposal. It also holds hearings for people to explain to the committee why their resolutions should be funded. The budget process at convention runs parallel to the resolution process and, often, one process overtakes the other.During this convention, the most visible example of this is the question of prayer book revision. At the time the committee finished the budget, the convention had not yet decided whether to begin a years-long process of revising the Book of Common Prayer. Deputies passed a resolution to do so on July 7. Bishops began debating the issue on July 9 but recessed without voting and took up the question again on July 10 after PB&F had completed the budget. That house approved a substitute resolution; the deputies will have to debate and vote on it.“We could not predict how the church will ultimately move on prayer book revision,” Lane said. “After lengthy conversation, we determined that putting aside a large amount of money for something that wasn’t certain was poor stewardship and putting in a token amount was disrespectful of intended work.”Thus, PB&F did not budget any money for such work. Lane and Miles believe that the Executive Council, the officers of the church and the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music will have to craft a budget process if the convention decides to go forward on prayer book revision.There is good news in the budget at many levels, beginning with the practical. At the beginning of the 2016-2018 triennium, less than 50 percent of the church’s 109 dioceses and three regional areas contributed the then-voluntary 15 percent of their income to the churchwide budget. In this final year of the three-year cycle, more than 80 percent are doing so. Diocesan funding is the budget’s primary source of income.“My sense is that this is some of the best financial news in a generation for the Episcopal Church,” Lane said. “We are very close to the place where all of our dioceses are equal partners in the mission of the church in terms of funding. That can’t be celebrated too much. It’s tremendous good news.”Miles acknowledged that there are those who say the budget has less money to work with because the last meeting of convention lowered the asking from 18 percent in 2016 to 16.5 in 2017 and then to 15 this year. “They’re really not correct,” she said. “We’re doing better now than we were when we had a higher number that people couldn’t reach.”The convention listened to dioceses who wanted to be able to keep more money for mission and ministry at home, Lane said. Moreover, “many dioceses were seeking a way not to be second-class citizens” because they could not give the total percentage asked. Lowering the ask helped more of the smaller dioceses become full partners, he said.The General Convention in 2015 turned the voluntary diocesan budgetary asking system into a mandatory assessment, beginning with the 2019-2021 budget cycle. If all dioceses paid the full 15 percent, the budget would have $88.8 million on that income line.Not all dioceses pay the full asking for a variety of reasons. Diocesan commitments for 2016 and 2017 are here. Dioceses may ask for full or partial waivers, and Lane said only 19 dioceses are asking for those waivers and $5.5 million is in the budget to account for those waivers.Without getting a waiver, a diocese that does not pay the full assessment will be unable to get grants or loans from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (the name under which the Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission).Each year’s annual giving in the three-year budget is based on a diocese’s income two years earlier. PB&F’s draft budget allows dioceses to exempt $140,000 of income from their assessment calculation. The exemption was $120,000 during the 2012-2015 triennium.Even with that solid financial grounding, the committee was challenged in its work with more than $12 million in new spending requests that were not in council’s draft budget.Lane and Miles said PB&F had three principles guiding its work in considering those spending requests. The first was not to add to the churchwide staff if the position did not have what Lane called “significant new work.” The second was to favor the creation of networks and time-limited task forces, rather than new canonically required standing commissions. And, third, the committee focused on keeping money in dioceses by preserving the assessment rate at 15 percent and encouraging dioceses to be engaged in networking with other entities for work they felt was important rather than putting it back in the churchwide structure.Those principles echo the recommendations made to the 2015 General Convention by the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church (TREC) after it spent approximately two years in a dialogue with Episcopalians about the structure of the church and its relationship to mission.PB&F did not want to “rebuild the bureaucracy” of the churchwide operation, Lane said.“We don’t believe that the church has yet lived into the culture change that was proposed by the TREC report,” he said. “Part of our struggle at this convention was responding to the outpouring of resolutions asking for things to be restored and rebuilt, rather than seeking new ways of doing work. We want to encourage the church to continue to look at a leaner, more flexible way of operating – a way of operating closer to the ground.”Miles said one task force only asked for $100 to cover the phone bill for meetings via conference call. “Good for them,” she said.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Program Budget & Finance Comments (1) Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Tags Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME General Convention 2018, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NClast_img read more


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first_img Planting Progress Made in Southern Indiana Planting Progress Made in Southern Indiana Previous articleIndiana Corn Planting Completion at 8 PercentNext articleIndiana Corn Marketing Council Announces New Officers Gary Truitt Goebel reports that flooding in river bottom areas in Indiana and Illinois is a problem, but, in certain soil types, the ground is dry enough to work.  He warns, however, that patience is a virtue this year, “As we get later and later folks are going to want to rush it.” He said planting too early can cause more problems than waiting a few extra days.  He added that so far most farmers have been waiting until field conditions are optimal.  Goebel reported that farmers are looking at this as more of a normal spring and hoping this will be an indication of a more normal growing season. Facebook Twitter Home News Feed Planting Progress Made in Southern Indiana SHARE By Gary Truitt – May 6, 2013 Listen to the complete report with Darren Goebel on the audio section of our Smartphone app and on the agronomy page of this website.  Hoosier Ag Today field updates are made possible by DuPont Pioneer. According to the National Ag Statistics Service, there were 3 days suitable for field work last week.  In their Monday report, they said that 8 percent of the intended corn acreage in Indiana has been planted, compared with 82 percent last year and 41 percent for the 5-year average. By area, 7 percent of the corn acreage has been planted in the north, 6 percent in the central region, and 15 percent in the south. While planters are still parked on many Indiana farms, last week’s window of warm dry weather did allow some planting to take place especially in southern Indiana. Darren Goebel reports that planters were rolling in Southern Indiana last week, “I would estimate from reports I have been getting back from Pioneer sales reps that we have about 30% of the corn planted in the Southern 1/3rd of Indiana.” But a weekend of rain brought that progress to a halt, “Those rains have knocked us out of the fields for most of this week. We may resume early next week.”  He added there is still plenty of time to get a crop established and said there is no need to change maturity dates yet, “Last year, our May planted corn did better than our March and April planted corn.” SHARE Facebook Twitterlast_img read more


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first_img October 15, 2020 Find out more News New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council Reporters Without Borders calls for the continuation of diplomatic efforts that could help improve respect for human rights in Cuba. In particular, it thinks it is essential that the United States should lift its embargo of Cuba, which just bolsters the regime while penalising the population. Follow the news on Cuba Cuba and its Decree Law 370: annihilating freedom of expression on the Internet February 24, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 After a year of Raúl Castro as president, political opening still ignores imprisoned journalists News Help by sharing this information May 6, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts News Reporters Without Borders notes with regret that the Cuban government has stubbornly refused to release 23 arbitrarily detained journalists, including its correspondent Ricardo González Alfonso, in the 12 months since Raúl Castro was confirmed as President of the Council of State on 24 February 2008, 19 months after taking over provisionally from his ailing elder brother Fidel. There have been a few signs of a political opening-up in the past year but, in all, Cuba continues to hold around 200 political prisoners. The press freedom organisation calls for the continuation of diplomatic efforts that could help change this situation and, in particular, the lifting of the US embargo of Cuba that has been in place since 1962.“Nineteen of the 23 journalists currently imprisoned in Cuba for their opinions and their reports were arrested in the ‘Black Spring’ crackdown of 2003 and will begin their seventh year in detention on 18 March,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This situation is all the more absurd and cruel as the authorities have agreed to release or, on health grounds, suspend the sentences of some of the 75 dissidents arrested in that crackdown. “It also stands in complete contradiction to the intentions manifested by the government when it signed two UN human rights conventions and partially liberalised the communications sector. The government cannot keep on evading this contradiction as it tries to consolidate its diplomatic ties and extricate Cuba from its isolation.“We again call on the countries engaged in a dialogue with Cuba, especially its Latin American partners, to step up their mediation on behalf of the imprisoned journalists in the name of the free expression that is recognised everywhere else in the hemisphere. In this respect, we think it is necessary that the United State lift the embargo impose 47 years ago on Cuba. Condemned by virtually the entire international community, this embargo just bolsters the regime while penalising the population.”Raúl Castro took over at the head of the Council of State nine days after four of the “Black Spring detainees,” including independent journalist Alejandro González Raga and José Gabriel Ramón Castillo, the editor of a dissident socio-cultural magazine, were released as a result of Spanish government mediation and flew to Spain.Shortly after Raúl Castro’s installation, the Cuban government signed two UN human rights conventions, one concerning economic, social and cultural rights, the other concerning civil and political rights. A year later, neither of these treaties has been ratified.As soon as he was installed, Raúl Castro lifted the ban which until then had barred Cubans entering the country’s luxury hotels with better Internet connections, although their prices are prohibitive in a country where the average salary is about 13 dollars a month. Other measures followed in the communications domain, including legalisation of the acquisition of personal computers and mobile phones.These changes have in no way diminished the government’s repressive attitude towards those who try to circulate news and information that it does not control. Online activity continues to be monitored and the Internet is regularly blocked. Internet access nonetheless also suffers from major technical difficulties resulting from communications restrictions imposed by the US embargo. This led Michael Parmly, then head of the US Interests Section in Havana, to urge his government on 4 July 2008 to allow Cubans to have better Internet access. His request has so far been ignored and Cuba is currently counting on Venezuela’s help to achieve this.The softening of the US embargo announced by President Barack Obama’s new administration is expected above all to relax restrictions on visits to the island by Cuban exiles and the amount of money they can send to their relatives there. The Cuban government made no concessions after the European Union, on 23 June 2008, definitively lifted the sanctions which it had imposed after the “Black Spring” (and soon suspended). Nonetheless, the European sanctions were, as the US embargo continues to be, a powerful argument that is used by the government to justify gagging all of its opponents.The journalists arrested during the “Black Spring” were given sentences ranging from 14 to 27 years in prison on the spurious grounds that they were “mercenaries in the pay of the United States.” As a result of the embargo, the government is also able to cite “North American oppression” as grounds for denying its citizens access to diverse news and information. CubaAmericas Organisation CubaAmericas to go further RSF_en News RSF and Fundamedios welcome US asylum ruling in favor of Cuban journalist Serafin Moran Santiago October 12, 2018 Find out morelast_img read more


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first_imgTop StoriesSupreme Court Issues Circular On Listing Of Cases Before Vacation Benches For First Part of Summer Vacation Radhika Roy7 May 2021 12:12 AMShare This – xSupreme Court has issued a circular stipulating the directions to “meet the demand of justice and for hearing of matters of extreme urgent nature” that is to take place during the First Part of the Summer Vacation, i.e. from 10th May 2021 to 25th May 2021.1. From 10th May to 16th May, two Division Benches will conduct a hearing through Video Conferencing Mode on Tuesday and Friday. 2. From 17th May to 25th May, two Division Benches will conduct hearing through Video Conferencing Mode on Tuesday and Friday. 3. The matters, whether Fresh or After Notice, mentioned by Advocates/Party-in-Person requesting for listing during the vacation will be listed before the Vacation Benches. Those desirous of getting their matters listed before Vacation Benches may send their request for extremely urgent listing, incorporating reasons for extremely urgent listing online on the email address – [email protected] The extremely urgent matters which have been received upto Thursday will be listed on Tuesday, and the matters received upto Monday, will be listed on Friday. 5. Constitution of Vacation Benches for Second and Third Part of the Vacation, i.e. from 26th May to 10th June, and 11th June to 27th June, will be notified later on. Taking into account the COVID-19 second wave, the Supreme Court had advanced its summer break from May. It is scheduled to reopen on June 28. The Court was otherwise scheduled to close on May 14. Click here to download the circularTagsSupreme Court Vacation Benches Next Storylast_img read more


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first_img Horizons will support Tharp’s conviction in an awesome and entertaining way, Hicks said.“The pieces in Act Two are absolutely beautiful,” she said. “And, it’s so exciting to see these talented young dancers on stage. The show will be amazing.” Horizons’ Fall dance concert held Friday and Saturday Hicks said Horizons will feature all genres of dance from contemporary ballet to high-energy hip-hop and jazz.“The second act will pay tribute to Twyla Tharp’s ‘The Creative Habit,’ which is part of the College of Communication and Fine Arts’ year long celebration of the creative process,” Hicks said.Tharp’s firm conviction is that, through dance, creativity is within the reach of all who are willing to devote the ritual of consistent effort and hard word. Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… By The Penny Hoarder Sponsored Content The dance program at Troy University started only a year and a half ago and was the vision and hope of Dr. Jack Hawkins Jr., chancellor.“We started with the seven dancers and are growing from there,” Hicks said. “These elite dancers have participated in dance conventions so the word has gotten out and there has been an influx of interest. We hit the ground running and dance is happening at Troy University.” Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Latest Stories Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Those who enjoy dancing as a “spectator” are in for a real treat when the Troy University College of Communication and Fine Arts presents “Horizons” at 7:30 tonight and Saturday at the Claudia Crosby Theater on the university campus.Tickets for the Fall Dance Concert are $5 for the general public and will be available at the door.“The Horizons concert is going to be a great show,” said Deborah Hicks, Troy University coordinator of dance. “Our dance ensemble has increased from seven to 15 this year and it is so good. I’m so excited about this concert.”center_img Email the author You Might Like H1N1 vaccines available today More H1N1 vaccines are available at the Pike County Health Department beginning today. Clinic Supervisor Debbie Baker said the shots… read more Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits By Jaine Treadwell Book Nook to reopen Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Print Article Published 12:00 am Friday, November 13, 2009last_img read more


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first_img A pioneering recruitment initiative in an NHS Trust dubbed “the grow your own staff nurses” scheme has gained national recognition for HR managers.Basildon and Thurrock General Hospitals NHS Trust has been granted beacon status by the Department of Health for its good practice solution to staff retention problems.Head of project development John Adsett said the scheme gives support staff the opportunity to gain GNVQ level 2 and 3 in caring and the chance of a secondment to the University of East Anglia for a nursing degree.There are around 100 people at different stages of the scheme, and more than 30 are seconded on to it each year. Adsett said it was one of the first NHS recruitment and retention schemes drawn up in partnership with managers and unions. “It was drawn up in partnership before it became a buzzword. We sat down with managers, trade unions and staff to draw up the scheme,” he said. NHS trust wins award for growing its own nursesOn 3 Oct 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more


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