Category: acpifsxr

Category: acpifsxr

first_imgIngredients supplier, Beacon Foods, has joined forces with a group of academics and food industry professionals with the aim of developing food industry skills in the country.The new group, Food Industry Skills Strategy Group, will oversee and direct the Food Industry Skills Project. Other members in the group include leading food producers, Premier Foods and Northern Foods, which seek to provide expert advice on the needs of the industry in order to provide employees and graduates with the skills and experience they need.The Higher education Funding Council has allocated £250,000 of funding to the project, which will go towards the development and design of a Masters course, and other industry specific short courses. The project also seeks to create a bursary scheme for food science related degrees at Welsh Universities. The University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (UWIC), Food Centre Wales and Improve are among a number of higher education institutions and skills groups that will focus on the developing professionals in the industry, specifically through skills delivery.“This group has pan-Wales representation and we have deliberately chosen companies from across a majority of key sectors, covering various products and processes like dairy, meat and organic produce,” said Helen Taylor, UWIC’s Food Industry Skills co-ordinator and chair of the group.Linda Lloyd, Beacon Foods’ human resources director, said: “We are delighted to be part of this exciting initiative and to be associated with a project that increases awareness of the food industry in Wales.”last_img read more


Category: acpifsxr

first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNationalNewsSouth Bend Market Twitter (Photo supplied/U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski) Second District Representative Jackie Walorski spoke with Michiana’s Morning News on Wednesday.The Congresswoman talked about this week’s Primary vote in the Hoosier state, the latest coronavirus information, and the recent nationwide unrest.Hear the conversation by clicking here. Google+ WhatsApp WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Pinterest Previous articlePolice investigating car vs. motorcycle crash in St. Joseph CountyNext articleFort Wayne among Top 10 cities with COVID unemployment increase Tommie Lee Facebook By Tommie Lee – June 3, 2020 0 526 Twitter Pinterest Jackie Walorski on virus, violence and voteslast_img read more


Category: acpifsxr

first_imgBeloved bassist Oteil Burbridge has been a busy man of late. Fans could catch him all over town at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, and ever since then he’s been putting his time in with the newest Grateful iteration, Dead & Company. Playing alongside three of the band’s legendary members, Bob Weir, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, is no easy feat, let alone musicians like Jeff Chimenti and John Mayer getting into the mix.When we last spoke to Burbridge, he was just a few shows into the band’s debut fall tour. With some more Grateful Dead experience under his belt, including some fun New Year’s shows, a few late night TV performances, and this week’s performance at The Fillmore in San Francisco, CA, we caught up with the esteemed bassist to talk all things Dead & Company.Read on for our exclusive chat with the one and only Oteil Burbridge.L4LM: The last time we spoke, you were just a few dates into your tour. What was it like bringing such an iconic catalogue to venues across the country last year?OB: The catalogue is the most fun thing about this band. The breadth and depth of it is so huge. Stadiums are gonna be a new experience for me too. I’ve never wanted to see a band at a stadium. I come from a jazz background more than a rock one. I’ve only seen one stadium show in my life and it was GD 50 at Santa Clara. It’s gonna be a trip doing those. With this music, those venues can actually sound good too, because the dynamic range is so drastic. We can play quietly for so long that you can really hear things a lot better than if we are just blasting at full volume every song.L4LM: The Fillmore is such an important venue in the Grateful Dead’s, and rock and roll’s, history. What was it like performing there?OB: Knowing the history of the Fillmore and being older made playing there with Dead & Co pretty mind blowing. When I got there, there was a picture in the dressing room and Bob looked like he hadn’t turned 20 yet. Bill Graham looked so young in it too. It stops you in your tracks. I found the poster of when I played there with Aquarium Rescue Unit opening for Bruce Hornsby and headlining with Vida Blue. This week on: “You Tell Me!”, did Oteil enjoy playing a free show, for the hometown San Francisco fans, at the Fillmore, with three original members of the Grateful Dead???   Can’t wait to put up the poster from that show at my house!L4LM: So how excited are you for Dead & Company’s summer tour?OB: Excited like you can’t imagine. Last year was so much fun but I can tell the band is in a new place this year. Having the support from the fans really frees you to not think so much and just be responsive to the moment. In rehearsals we’re hitting some grooves and jams that are going in some beautiful directions. It’s so nice when everyone has agreed to take side roads and get lost together. There’s some of that on tape from the Fillmore show we just did. Directions we’ve never gone before. You can’t beat that.L4LM: Now that the band has spent some time together, is the rehearsal process different than it was during the initial practices?OB: Not really. It can be really slow sometimes. Sometimes I worry that it’s a little hard for the original guys to get too excited about John and I always having to play catch up. But then again I’m sure the songs feel different with John and I, so that probably mitigates some of the possible boredom. It’s a process of fine tuning. I think we have more confidence now but the focus is always on how we can make the show better. When you a have a group with as much collective experience as these musicians, that can be an incredibly fun process too.L4LM: Any chance you can fill us in on any new songs Dead & Company might debut?OB: Now that would really take the fun out off all the hard work we’re doing to surprise you guys wouldn’t it? We busted out a few new ones at the Fillmore. “Queen Jane,” “Days Between.” Jesus that song is amazing. We’ve got more coming too!L4LM: It must have been intense to learn dozens of songs from the Grateful Dead catalog. Which tunes came the most naturally and which were more of a challenge?OB: The bluegrassy, blues and country ones are probably the easiest, but then you never know because the vast majority of GD songs have some little twist in there to catch you. You can’t be bored playing this music. As soon as you think you have it down, something will trip you up. I take them one at a time. Each song hits you on multiple levels as far as the content of the lyrics and the mixture of musical styles. I spend so much more time reading the lyrics in the Teleprompter now that I know the music part a little better and it really changes the way I play it. My awareness of the song grows over time. The process is like a vine growing. That also makes it less intimidating.L4LM: One of the clips that got passed around a lot was your bass solo in “Eyes Of The World” at MSG. Was that an “oh my god” moment? Did you have a lot of those on tour?OB: Yes that was nice. A relief. It gives you the confidence to not worry. The real objective for me as a bassist is to help the whole band have those moments collectively. Last night at the Fillmore was no exception. We definitely had some of those moments! The history of that place had much more of an impact on me now that I am older. I’ll never forget that show for the rest of my life. I’m SO glad that show is on tape.L4LM: You guys seemed like you were having a blast on the two late night shows of 2016. What were those experiences like?OB: TV is always a challenge for bands like Dead & Co and the Allman Brothers Band cause you have to cut everything so short. But we got to play some longer songs on the Kimmel Show because it was outdoors and we did a couple that were not shown on TV. I know our fans were happy about that!Dead & Company Heats Up ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’ With Smokin’ Five Song SetL4LM: Are you looking forward to Bonnaroo? Any chance we’ll see you join forces with some friends at the festival?OB: I’m not sure what our schedule is there yet. Sometimes we play and then split immediately. If I’m able to I always like to see other groups and sit in too. I really wanna go to the stand up comedy stage!L4LM: The Dead & Company New Year’s show was out of this world! What was the planning like for that? Did you get to smoke any of the giant joint?OB: Haha, there was no weed in that joint! I don’t think…..  It was such an amazing night for me. Planning shows like that is always so much fun. I’m not part of a lot of big production decisions like giant flying joints but musically and otherwise this band is about creating memorable events in people’s lives. There are so many things that are considered and tossed around toward that end.L4LM: Bob Weir recently spoke about a dream he had, where he saw you with white hair playing in Dead & Company long after he was gone. Are you planning to fulfill his prophecy?OB: You know my lot in life seems to have been primarily to help classic rockers keep their flames fed, stoked and oxygenated. And while I’m honored that Bob, Bill and Mickey feel that way, I don’t like to talk or think about when they have passed on. It is so amazing when you have nights like the Fillmore and people who saw the Dead there back in the old days tell you how much they loved your show. To be a part of that history is simply overwhelming. I don’t know how else to put it. I really freaked out that night. In a good way. John Mayer And Bob Weir Discuss Dead & Company’s Future Plans, Possible AlbumBut I guarantee you I will be playing this music for the rest of my life. Plus I still have so many tunes to learn. It’s possible that it’s gonna take me the rest of my life! The one thing that I will say about life after the original members have passed on is thank God for the Chimentis, Kimocks, and Kadleciks out there to help the future generations get it just right. Their insights concerning this music have been a huge help to me. They are true apostles of this music. They have they’re own things too to be sure. But I don’t know who knows this music any more thoroughly than them.L4LM: John Mayer has gotten some media attention for his “conversion” into the Grateful Dead culture. What was that process like for you?OB: Media is what it is. It’s a truly scary thing. It can turn so mean and brutal on a dime. I seriously want to ignore it but it’s impossible in the Internet age. You have to just embrace it. On the other hand part of the media trip has been really fun. I feel like I helped pull off the extremely improbable/impossible: Converting Deadheads to John Mayer fans! Having all of that play out in the media was a wild ride! I’ll never forget it! It taught me a lot too. About being judgmental. Also, let me say that John’s radar for paparazzi is amazing. Fame is a weird, weird thing. I’m really glad I can still go to the grocery store!L4LM: If the Allman Brothers were to reunite down the line, would you participate in those shows as well? Is there enough room in one brain for the whole of Grateful Dead and Allman Brothers catalogs?OB: I’ve got plenty of room left in this brain. You should see what I learned just for New Orleans Jazz Fest alone! You literally would not believe it. Dead & Co only does about 20-30 dates right? There’s PLENTY of time left for an ABB tour. We’ll see what happens. I’m game for it. Playing in both bands in the same year would certainly be cool. Never think your best days are behind you. Even if you’re on your deathbed……..L4LM: Thanks so much for everything, Oteil. Looking forward to seeing you and Dead & Company out on the road!Dead & Company’s tour begins on June 10th and wraps around the country. Don’t miss out!last_img read more


Category: acpifsxr

first_imgAfter seven years as Harvard’s Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister of the Memorial Church, Jonathan L. Walton will step down this summer to assume the role of dean of the Wake Forest University School of Divinity, Harvard announced today.When he assumed leadership of the Memorial Church in 2012, Walton took over the role held for almost 40 years by Harvard legend Peter J. Gomes, a renowned Baptist preacher and scholar with a fierce wit who challenged intolerance and prejudice from the pulpit.It may have been a daunting task, but Walton made the job his own by simultaneously respecting its long history and his predecessor while expanding efforts to press for social change and inclusion, and further opening up the church to Harvard and the wider community with the sentiment, “Everyone may not belong to Mem Church, but Mem Church belongs to everyone.”“Harvard has been an incredible place for me professionally and for my family, personally. We developed incredible relationships that I am certain will stand the test of time and distance,” said Walton, an ordained Baptist minister whose research focuses on the intersections of religion, politics, and media culture. “The Memorial Church embraced me and helped me to grow intellectually and spiritually. Over the past seven years, I feel that we have extended that embrace to a wide array of people from varying walks of life. Those who gather today at Mem Church are both younger and more colorful, literally and figuratively, than when I arrived.”Looking ahead, Walton said he is eager to head an institution that is devoted to preparing people for lives in ministry.“At Wake Forest School of Divinity, there are about 125 master of divinity school students that are entering pulpits across this country and engaged in human services. To think that I could be a part of helping to shape the curriculum, and thus build upon the great work that they have been doing in preparing women and men for the ministry, is an exciting proposition.”Across the University, members of the Harvard community reflected on Walton’s time in Cambridge.“Jonathan Walton is an extraordinary talent, one of the finest preachers I have ever heard,” said Harvard President Larry Bacow. “His deep commitment to our students and our community have strengthened spiritual life at the University. With great compassion and wisdom, he has constantly reminded us of our responsibility to use our gifts to make the world a better place, and I am confident that he will make Wake Forest a better place, just as he has Harvard.”An author, ethicist, and religious scholar, Walton graduated from Morehouse College and attended Princeton Theological Seminary. Prior to arriving at Harvard, he was assistant professor of religious studies at the University of California, Riverside, from 2006‒2010. He joined Harvard Divinity School (HDS) in 2010 and became the Pusey Minister in July 2012.“Jonathan exemplifies the best in the great history of professorial ministers at the Memorial Church: He is both a scholar of world renown as well as a preacher whose voice resonates with both the timbres of a long and sublime African American tradition and the exquisitely subtle capacity for explications of the Harvard ministers who have preceded him. In other words, he excels both as a person of thought and a person of faith,” said Henry Louis “Skip” Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher Jr. University Professor and director of the Hutchins Center.During his tenure, Walton made a number of changes aimed at further opening the church to Harvard students, faculty, staff, and the public. He introduced a weekly coffee meeting for the community following Wednesday morning prayers, expanded the scope of speakers at weekday prayer services, and strengthened ties with HDS by affiliating the ministers there with the Memorial Church.Walton was also committed to embracing Harvard’s diverse community, which comprises people of multiple faiths. In 2017 he requested the recruitment of the University’s first Muslim chaplain. The same year he announced that Lucy Forster-Smith, Sedgwick Chaplain to the University and senior minister in the Memorial Church, would dedicate her efforts full-time to multifaith initiatives.Anyone who has corresponded with Walton by email or text would have seen his familiar sign-off, “One Luv.” The line is a nod to Baptist minister and Civil Rights leader Benjamin Elijah Mays, who said, “The love of God and the love of humanity are indeed one love.”“That’s the lens he tried to bring to the community, to Harvard itself, to the Bible, to his vocation,” said Stephanie Paulsell, Susan Shallcross Swartz Professor of the Practice of Christian Studies at HDS. Another hallmark of Walton’s ministry, said Paulsell, was his drive to make the church “a place where the intellectual, the spiritual, and the ethical were all nurtured.”“He wanted the church to be a place where you could really be challenged intellectually or you could participate in spiritual practice, deepen your spiritual life, and where there were opportunities to serve our neighbors both close at hand and far away,” said Paulsell.In 2016 and 2017 Walton also oversaw a major, multimillion-dollar renovation to the church, one of the most extensive to the building in its 87-year history, and the result, he said when it reopened, of “collective moral imagination.” The updates included an overhaul of the ground floor that saw the addition of meeting rooms, offices, a music rehearsal suite, and a “Student Oasis,” an open area with a meeting room, kitchen, and comfortable chairs where Harvard students could study, socialize, or take a break from their busy schedules. The work also made the building more accessible and included installing air conditioning in the church, which could become notoriously sweltering during the summer months.As a passionate advocate for civil rights, Walton used his Harvard time to continue to press for social change. He led Harvard students on service trips in the U.S. and South Africa; frequently used his sermons to speak out against police violence, racial profiling, and mass incarceration; and supported the efforts of the Black Lives Matter movement and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration policy that protects young undocumented immigrants from deportation. In 2017 Walton, along with other University professors, was arrested for blocking traffic along Massachusetts Avenue while protesting the Trump administration’s decision to end the DACA program.An avid sports fan, he was a regular at Crimson athletic events and hosted popular tailgate parties at his Sparks House home. Harvard men’s basketball coach Tommy Amaker said Walton and his family were “advisers, mentors, counselors, supporters, and friends” to the Harvard basketball program, and called their impact on the Harvard community “immeasurable.”“Rev and Cecily (and their amazing kids!) have been more than friends — they have become family to my wife and me,” wrote Amaker in an email. “As the saying goes, ‘There is nothing better than when your family become your friends and when your friends become your family.’ Walton Nation have become family to so many here at Harvard and the broader community!”Walton said helping as many people as possible feel like part of the Harvard community was his driving mission as Pusey Minister.“I felt that if the Memorial Church could not lead the way in terms of making people feel welcome and affirmed at Harvard University, then we should just close our doors. So, I hope that others will recall my time here and say ‘I felt seen.’”The University will begin a search for Walton’s replacement in the coming months.last_img read more


Category: acpifsxr

first_imgHoughton Library’s head of teaching and learning, Kristine Greive, who managed Klebanoff-O’Brien’s fellowship, said, “Part of learning to do an intensive research project like this is learning where you have something to add.”In Klebanoff-O’Brien’s case, depicting all three of Dante’s realms in a single image is novel, while her image-based project commentary is “unique and fascinating,” Greive said. “She’s done some really interesting work.”The Office of Undergraduate Research offers 10 to 15 SHARP fellowships annually, Greive said, but Houghton’s is the only one that gives student applicants full license to choose their project rather than asking for assistance with an existing project.When Klebanoff-O’Brien applied for the fellowship, it was with the idea that she would focus on Dante illustrations. Since high school, she has viewed Dante’s works as a fascinating intersection of literature, art, and science.“I knew I wanted to explore Dante more, especially the visual angle,” she said.Houghton has a vast, digitized collection of woodcut illustrations of “The Divine Comedy” from the 1400s, which Klebanoff-O’Brien anticipated using for her project. But many of the other sources she ultimately used to create her map — including pre-Copernican astronomical materials, Renaissance-era manuscripts, and Bible illustrations — were unexpected.“She kept looking beyond the bounds of what she thought she was looking for,” Greive said. “I think it’s a [lesson that] being curious and playful and casting a wide net can be informative and transformative to your research.” “The fellowship is an opportunity for undergraduates to follow their own passion and explore something that comes entirely from their own interest, as long as it’s supported by our collections.” — Kristine Greive, Houghton Library Greive said she strongly encourages future applicants to the SHARP fellowship to think about creative research projects like Klebanoff-O’Brien’s.“The fellowship is an opportunity for undergraduates to follow their own passion and explore something that comes entirely from their own interest, as long as it’s supported by our collections,” Greive said. “We’re excited to see any research project, no matter what form it takes.”Though this year’s research project was unexpectedly virtual, both Greive and Klebanoff-O’Brien were grateful the SHARP fellowships were able to take place remotely.“Of course, it was sad not to be able to see these incredible resources at Houghton in person, but I did feel I was still able to create something I was excited about,” said Klebanoff-O’Brien. “It turned out really well. It was the perfect companion during the pandemic.”For Greive, the success of the virtual fellowship has shown her what Houghton can do for students even when the library building is closed.“Working on this fellowship has been such an uplifting experience,” she said. “It’s helped me see how much meaningful teaching and learning can happen with special collections over Zoom.” As she ended the academic year last spring, Madeleine Klebanoff-O’Brien ’22 was hoping that unlike so much else, her summer research fellowship at Houghton Library wouldn’t be canceled due to the pandemic.Luckily for her, the library was ready to take the fellowship virtual — and two months later, she has not only gained a new set of research skills, she’s developed a new way of looking at research altogether.Klebanoff-O’Brien, whose research focused on Dante Alighieri’s “Divine Comedy,” concluded her fellowship by creating a fully image-based research product. She illustrated Dante’s entire cosmos with visual details pulled from Houghton sources, including depictions of Earth’s elements inspired by medieval astronomical texts and drawings of angels based on 14th-century woodcuts. To explain the map’s symbolic elements to an average viewer, Klebanoff-O’Brien also made an image-based commentary.“My revelation in this work has been all the associations that can be built visually,” she said. “The idea that the eye can make an association before the mind can.”,Klebanoff-O’Brien, who is a comparative literature concentrator, had never done independent research before her Summer Humanities and Arts Research Program (SHARP) fellowship at Houghton, a collaboration with Harvard’s Office of Undergraduate Research. The fellowship, which supports building research skills, showed her that both conducting and presenting research can allow for creativity.“It’s been very freeing to approach things this way, through this visual lens,” she said. “I want to do more in the future, bringing that visual methodology into studying texts.”Her cosmographical map represents hell, purgatory, and heaven as described in “The Divine Comedy,” and shows how the three are interconnected using symbols and images from the materials in Houghton. Klebanoff-O’Brien incorporated drawings of Dante’s three guides into the map, as well — her depiction of Beatrice is inspired by a Botticelli drawing, while her Virgil is based on an early woodcut, and St. Bernard on a more contemporary illustration.Creating a cosmographical map, she said, allowed her to explore how illustrations of “The Divine Comedy” can add to the reader’s experience, while letting her participate in this tradition rather than just study it.“The cosmographer tries to forge a [visual] link between the three realms … and synthesize everything into a total vision,” she said. “The idea is, by allowing the [reader] to see with this total vision, the reader can experience a shadow of Dante’s own enlightenment.” “It’s been very freeing to approach things this way, through this visual lens.” — Madeleine Klebanoff-O’Brien ’22last_img read more


Category: acpifsxr

first_imgBy George Boyhan Georgia Extension Service Volume XXVII Number 1 Page 9 Transplants can make your garden more successful. And they’ve been around for a long time, although they haven’t always been available in nice, easy-to-handle six-packs.Some backgroundAt first, vegetable transplants were field-grown, pulled, wrapped in bundles bare-root and sold to growers and homeowners. Large numbers of transplants were handled this way both for commercial growers and serious gardeners.In fact, your local feed-and-seed probably still handles many transplants this way. Most of your cool-season crops — onions, collards, broccoli, etc. — are still available this way.These transplants are great because they’re relatively cheap, and you can get them in fairly large quantities for bigger gardens.Transplants have come a long way, however, and many more are available in small plastic packs of three to 12 plants. These packs are sold separately or in a tray called a flat.The plants are grown in peat-based media in greenhouses. They used to be available only in the spring and early summer. But more and more can be found at other times of the year and suitable for the particular season.Transplant advantagesTransplants have some real advantages over direct seeding. You’re guaranteed a perfect stand, since you’ll be putting a transplant everywhere you want a plant — no more skips or overseeding.Your crop will be ready earlier, too. If you can’t wait for that red-ripe tomato, fresh bell pepper or head of cauliflower, with transplants the wait is much shorter.When seeds germinate, they’re very susceptible to diseases and insects, which can be devastating. Transplants are tougher and better able to withstand such onslaughts.If you’re really ambitious, you might want to try growing your own. You can buy ready-made potting soil from many outlets, and flats with the pack inserts are also available. Plant seeds at a depth that’s about twice the diameter of the seed.Larger seeds are easier to handle and would be best for beginners. Watermelon, cantaloupe and squash are good choices.Don’t try everythingSome root crops such as carrots aren’t suitable for transplanting. The large taproot can become damaged in the transplanting process.Corn and potatoes can’t be transplanted well, either. With corn, disturbing the roots dramatically affects the plants’ growth. And since potatoes are grown from seed pieces (potato pieces), they don’t require transplanting.last_img read more


Category: acpifsxr

first_imgBy Dialogo June 22, 2011 The United States discussed efforts to be a “more effective” partner with Central America in fighting drug trafficking during Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit to Guatemala on 22 June, aides said. The chief US diplomat visited Guatemala City to discuss a counternarcotics strategy with the leaders of Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Other leaders or top officials attending the talks represented Mexico, Colombia, Chile, Spain and the European Union, they added. Clinton has “been concerned about the situation in Central America for some time,” Arturo Valenzuela, the assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere affairs, told reporters. As Mexico has tried to fight its drug trafficking scourge, drug mafias have increasingly pushed south into Central America and countries like Guatemala and Belize have seen a surge in violence that they are struggling to stop. Clinton has “been pushing for greater engagement on the part of the United States since she began to focus on these issues some time ago,” Valenzuela said. However, he said, the meeting did not amount to a donors’ conference and instead focused on using existing resources better. “The question is: Is the funding being used strategically in the appropriate way? And that’s what we’re going to be addressing in this meeting,” Valenzuela said. “The secretary may announce how we’re repackaging some of our own assistance,” in support of the counternarcotics strategies of the region’s countries, he said previous to the meeting. Washington cooperates with Central America through the Central American Regional Security Initiative, with a budget of 260 million dollars. Clinton’s main concern is organized crime and its threat to the continent’s democratic institutions, particularly those in Central America, said Michael Shifter, who heads the Inter-American Dialogue, a DC-based think tank. “When she thinks about the region, it is what concerns her most, and I believe she wants to achieve a concrete result to contain and respond to this growing criminality in Central America,” Shifter told AFP.last_img read more


Category: acpifsxr

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Nicholas BallasyThe NCUA’s Inspector General recommended ways the agency could improve its security policies and controls regarding agency-issued mobile devices, such as iPhones, to enhance the protection of its data and resources.“We determined that the controls associated with managing and securing personal mobile devices operating within the NCUA environment did not provide adequate protections over NCUA information, data and resources,” the IG’s audit of the NCUA’s mobile device security controls said. continue reading »last_img


Category: acpifsxr

first_img 73SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Details Over 10 years ago, David and I came together with a simple and ambitious plan: Deliver great content to the credit union industry, with the best possible distribution channel. Neither of us had any media experience and our credit union knowledge was pretty limited, but we had big ideas and a lot of passion around what was possible. We had no way of knowing what an incredible ride this would be and still– more than a decade in– I can’t believe how lucky we are that this is what we get to call “work.” It’s been an absolute blast bringing CUInsight.com to this industry and partnering with system leaders, change makers, and community contributors that have helped us realize our vision, in an industry where we have come to feel like we are part of the family.  For me, launching The CUInsight Experience podcast earlier this year was a great way to engage more deeply with credit union leaders and see even more of what our system has to offer. It also made me realize how much room there remains to grow in how we provide content, enrich the community we love, help our partners find greater success, and keep growing CUInsight into a media company of the future. As we look ahead to our next 10 years, we are ready to raise the bar for excellence and take on new challenges. Our start-up model has served us amazingly well for a decade and we could not be prouder of what we accomplished as a team and in partnership with those of you who took a chance on us from the very beginning. Now, we are ready to take a chance on someone, ourselves. We are extremely excited to launch our search for CUInsight’s first-ever CEO/Managing Director, who we plan to bring on-board later this year.Learn more here, then let us know: Was this job made for you? Do you know the perfect person to take on this new leadership role on our team? We’d love to hear from you. last_img read more


Category: acpifsxr

first_imgNow more than ever, credit union leadership knows the old mantra, “grow or be acquired” is alive and well, and it’s causing some sleepless nights as they feel the squeeze from all sides.  But, of the countless (and growing) regulatory, technological and competitive hurdles credit unions face today, there is a critical one that too often goes unmentioned — how to not only efficiently manage the staggering volumes of information passing through the CU’s various systems, but to go a step further to transform it into an active value-add.  Enterprise Content Management / Enterprise Information Management (ECM / EIM) may not be as “bright and shiny” as the promise of blockchain banking or the latest wearable tech, but it represents a dramatically understated and misunderstood potential for immediate and long term growth. The shiny piece of this puzzle is information and how we leverage it.First and foremost, a strong ECM / EIM solution should reduce overhead by automating the repetitive processes of credit union staff. It may not sound like much at first, but consider the time lost to employees manually hunting down and sending documents across multiple databases, day in and day out. Compound that across the entire institution and it quickly adds up. To be a truly innovative solution, an ECM / EIM system should also offer CU leadership the flexibility to tailor their workflows to the institution’s unique needs to maximize efficiency and ROI.Financial institutions’ content management systems shouldn’t just be for internal document storage, however. In the age of information, credit unions are sitting on troves of valuable member data that can be leveraged to great benefit to the CU, all while strengthening existing relationships. Members enjoy faster, more consistent experiences as staff are now freed to focus on their interactions. Meanwhile, the stored transactional metadata provides crucial business intelligence, enabling the credit union to efficiently develop and deliver more personal targeted offers and promotions that drive ever greater member loyalty.For many credit union executives, just behind the imperative for growth looms the specter of regulatory compliance. With an ever changing set of guidelines and requirements, CU leaders have to stay flexible while maintaining a competitive edge. To meet those needs, the CU’s choice of ECM / EIM solution should be reflective of that ability to adapt, removing, rather than compounding, one of many compliance headaches credit unions face.As credit unions look to the future they are continually forced to hone their strategies of how best to scale their operations, and their ECM / EIM solution should be the least of their concerns. Credit unions should put best practices in place early with a system built to scale quickly and effortlessly instead of waiting for often costly red flags to appear. Solutions like those offered by Alogent empower credit unions to build a firm ECM / EIM foundation for stronger and longer member relationships while greatly increasing operational efficiency and avoiding disruptions to growth due to new regulatory demands.In a world where time really is money there’s no replacement for efficiency. 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jason Schwabline Jason is the leader of product management and company strategy for Alogent. He spends much of his time traveling and evangelizing, and speaks regularly on the future of transformational technologies … Web: www.alogent.com Detailslast_img read more


Recent Comments