Category: msubjfsl

Category: msubjfsl

first_imgEmerging from Fort Collins, Colorado, Skydyed is a three-piece band that blends cutting edge electronic production with live instrumentation. Featuring Andrew Slattery on bass synths and bass guitar, Max Doucette on guitar and keys, and Shane Eagen on drums, the band integrates generations of the state’s extensive musical heritage with their own deep-seated ties to the electronic music scene.Skydyed continues to push the boundaries of “live electronic” music, and their new release, “Flicker Switch,” showcases the band’s mature sound. Sam Brouse of Papadosio not only co-produced the new song, but his piano and synth work can be heard coloring the track. With Skydyed’s tight musicianship and Brouse’s accompaniment, “Flicker Switch” is truly a vibrant piece of work.Listen to this new single, streaming below, or download it for free via SoundCloud.As this year is winding down, Skydyed offered up some thoughts on their growth in 2016 and what to expect in 2017. “2016 has been a very transformative year for us as a band, to say the least. With the release of our first full-length album in the spring, 12 festival performances all over the country this summer, and shows in a ton of places we’ve never been before, it’s really been our biggest year yet. We feel we are beginning to come into our own unique sound, and our live performances have never felt more locked in. Through all of these new experiences we’ve begun to get to know ourselves a bit better, as musicians and as people. There’s just something about spending countless hours in a cramped van together that creates a powerful bond, on stage and off.”Skydyed’s new EP Modulate, featuring “Flicker Switch” and more, is due out on December 9th. The band will be on the road in Colorado throughout early December. Check out their tour dates below, and be sure to keep up with them on Facebook, SoundCloud, and Spotify!last_img read more


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first_imgCatherine Dulac, Higgins Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is the winner of the 2017 Edward M. Scolnick Prize in Neuroscience. She was awarded the prize for her contributions to the understanding of how pheromones control brain function and behavior and the characterization of neuronal circuits underlying sex-specific behaviors.The Scolnick Prize is awarded annually by the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT to recognize outstanding advances in any field of neuroscience.Dulac is best known for her discovery of pheromone receptors and downstream brain circuits controlling sex-specific behaviors. Dulac has also studied genomic imprinting, an epigenetic phenomenon by which certain genes are differentially expressed depending on whether they were inherited from the mother or the father. Dulac’s work has revealed that imprinting of brain genes is much more common than previously realized, with important implications for basic biology and for the epidemiology of brain disorders.Among her many honors and awards, Dulac is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Chevalier de la Legion d’Honneur, a member of the French Academy of Sciences, and a member of the US National Academy of Sciences.The McGovern Institute will award the Scolnick Prize to Dr. Dulac on March 13. At 4:00 p.m. she will deliver a free, public lecture entitled “The Neurobiology of Social Behavior Circuits” at the McGovern Institute in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences Complex, 43 Vassar Street (building 46, room 3002) in Cambridge.last_img read more


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first_imgSeven Harvard researchers are among the 489 scientists who have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society.The lifetime appointment honors individuals because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. The fellows from Harvard are: Marcia Goldberg, David Liu, Eric Mazur, Matthew Meyerson, Christopher W. Stubbs, Jerrold Turner, and Lee Zou.Their research ranges from studying infectious diseases to the DNA to ultrashort-pulse lasers.Along with the other 2020 AAAS fellows, the scientists will be honored during a virtual forum in February. The fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue rosette pin, representing science and engineering.The AAAS was founded in 1848 and its tradition of naming AAAS Fellows began in 1874. It includes more than 250 affiliated societies and academies of science, serves 10 million individuals, and publishes the journal Science.Election as an AAAS fellow is an honor bestowed upon association members by their peers. For more information on the nomination process, visit the AAAS website.The fellows are recognized for the following:Goldberg, professor in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, was honored for her contributions to the field of microbial pathogenesis, particularly the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions.Liu, the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, was honored for pioneering advances such as base editing and DNA-encoded libraries that creatively integrate chemistry, evolution, and molecular biology to impact medicine and the life sciences.Mazur, the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics in FAS, was honored for advancing the physics and applications of ultrashort-pulse lasers and nonlinear optical devices, and for sparking worldwide adoption of active learning techniques through Peer Instruction.Meyerson, professor of pathology at HMS and researcher at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, was honored for distinguished contributions and pioneering genomic discoveries in cancer biology.Stubbs, the Samuel C. Moncher Professor of Physics and of Astronomy in FAS and dean of science, was honored for his pathbreaking work at the intersection of particle physics, gravitational physics, and cosmology, and for his contributions to arms control and international security issues.Turner, a professor of pathology and medicine at HMS and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, was honored for distinguished contributions to cell biology, physiology, pathobiology, and diagnosis in gastrointestinal science, particularly for defining functions, regulatory mechanisms, and molecular therapies targeting mucosal barriers.Zou, professor of pathology at HMS and associate scientific director of the Massachusetts General Hospital, for distinguished contributions to the fields of biochemistry and cancer, particularly for studies on the maintenance of genome stability.last_img read more


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first_imgCVPS Aug. 30, 2011, noon ‘Entire lines have disappeared’CVPS says completely new systems to be built in some locationsLine crews across central and southern Vermont are building completely new lines ‘ often in new locations ‘ as they work to restore power in the hardest-hit areas. ‘We normally would rebuild lines where they previously stood, but in town after town, that’s no longer an option because roads are gone and the soil has washed away completely,’ said Bill Jakubowski, CVPS’s coordinator of capital construction and right-of-ways.  ‘The old locations, in many cases, are simply not an option.’ CVPS spokesman Steve Costello said customers in many areas will see new lines in new places over the coming days.  ‘Typically we’d have extensive discussion about the location of new power lines, but our focus right now has to be on getting service back to every community we can reach as quickly as possible,’ Costello said.  ‘This is not business as usual. Entire lines have disappeared.’ Costello said where possible the company is conferring with local officials, but in some cases CVPS will simply have to build the lines where they can find access routes.  CVPS employees will be out surveying new lines today and in the coming days in advance of construction.Up-to-date outage numbers (by town) can be found at: http://www.cvps.com/CustomerService/outages/(link is external) and http://vtoutages.com/(link is external)MEDIA ADVISORY: Press Conference Scheduled WHO: Governor Peter Shumlin; Senator Bernie Sanders; Representative Peter Welch; Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate. WHAT: Press Conference WHERE: Burlington International Airport WHEN: 4 pm, Tuesday August 30. BURLINGTON, Vt. ‘ Governor Peter Shumlin, Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Peter Welch will greet Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator Craig Fugate at the Burlington International Airport at 11:30 a.m., tour the storm-damaged areas of the state via helicopter with Fugate, and return to the Burlington airport for a press conference at 4 pm, Army Aviation Facility, 142 Shamrock Drive, South Burlington.  Governor Shumlin will be visiting the communities of Pittsfield (approximately 2:45 p.m.), Stockbridge (approximately 3:45 p.m.) and Rochester (approximately 4:25 p.m.) this afternoon. In addition, Administration Secretary Jeb Spaulding and emergency officials will hold a press briefing to update on events at 4:30 p.m. at the Vermont Emergency Management operations center, now located in the FEMA offices in Burlington. Here is the most recent updates from various sources regarding the aftermath of Hurrican Irene, including emergency management action and news from some of the state’s electric utilities. Governor’s Office. August 31, 2011, 2 pm: CVPS Aug. 30, 2011 ‘ 7 a.m. updateIrene Restoration Day 2: More than 51,000 of the 70,000 customer outages restoredCVPS performs helicopter assessmentThousands will still be out for days, possibly weeks due to inaccessible roads Up-to-date outage numbers (by town) can be found at: http://www.cvps.com/CustomerService/outages/(link is external) and http://vtoutages.com/(link is external) As CVPS engineers and transmission supervisors performed helicopter flyovers Monday to assess the damage from the air, crews assisted by hundreds of outside line and tree contractors restored more than 51,000 of the more than 70,000 CVPS customer outages from Hurricane Irene. About 19,400 CVPS customers are without power this morning. CVPS support staff continued to work with state emergency management officials and the Vermont Agency of Transportation to develop travel and road work strategies to access customers. Route 4, East of Rutland on Monday. Photo: CVPSAn emergency bypass where Route 4 was washed out in Mendon will be completed today. Construction contractors worked through the night on the road. In cooperation with the Agency of Transportation, CVPS hired Belden Construction to build the emergency bypass, which will be available only to utility and emergency vehicles and will be monitored by law enforcement. A more permanent repair will require substantial planning and construction by the state.  Devastation is extensive across the CVPS system. A handful of examples among the dozens of major issues include: The near destruction of the Rochester Substation. Royalton Operations Supervisor Ben Bemis had to ride an off-road motorcycle to the site, which was inaccessible to trucks.  ‘The fence is gone, the transformer has been undermined, and debris is scattered all over the place,’ Bemis said.  ‘It’s looking pretty sad.’Numerous sections of Route 107 in Bethel virtually disappeared. The White River flooding took out numerous poles and hundreds of feet of line.The loss of a key bridge on Route 73 between Goshen and Rochester.  One end of the bridge supports washed out, dropping the span into the water below.  ‘The Route 73 bridge looks like a boat ramp going down into the river,’ Bemis said.The loss of not only dozens of utility poles, but the scouring of all of the soil that held the poles up.  Springfield Operations Supervisor Ed Whittemore said in many cases, even if the road existed, there is no soil left to install new poles.Projects that will entail the complete reconstruction of entire sections of the utility system.  In Jamaica, for example, crews were able to feed the center of the village through a backfeed, but the lines heading in both directions from the village center were washed away. In Wardsboro, Brattleboro Operations Supervisor Dave Miller said they found one washout that included five utility poles, but workers couldn’t go any further because the road was gone.  ‘God only knows what washouts there are beyond that one,’ Miller said.Up-to-date outage numbers (by town) can be found at: http://www.cvps.com/CustomerService/outages/(link is external) and http://vtoutages.com/(link is external) FEMA to Deliver Aid to VermontFEMA Distribution Center to be Established at Camp Johnson Monday, 10:30 pm: Thirty Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) trucks carrying emergency supplies are scheduled to arrive in Vermont tonight to provide aid for the thousands of Vermonters affected by Hurricane Irene.FEMA vehicles, carrying supplies such as food, blankets and other necessary items, will be establishing a distribution center at Camp Johnson in Colchester. From there, the relief supplies will be distributed to the Vermont communities in greatest need starting at sunrise on Tuesday, August 30.  Some communities are unreachable by roadways, so helicopters will be dispatched to distribute those supplies. National Guard will distribute the supplies to the communities reachable by land. ‘Our goal is to reach all Vermonters who have been affected by the storm and find themselves in need at this time,’ said Gov. Peter Shumlin.  ‘We are utilizing all available resources ‘ local, state and federal ‘ to get commodities to those in need.’ ‘This identified objective of commodity distribution is consistent with the Governor’s goal of assuring the safety and stability of all Vermonters affected by this storm,’ said Department of Public Safety Commissioner Keith Flynn, ‘and is done with the cooperation of our federal, state and local partners.’ Officials ask the public not to come to Camp Johnson to pick up supplies but to wait for their distribution on Tuesday morning.  VTrans Announces Road Openings Montpelier, VT 8/29/11 21:00 ‘ The Vermont Agency of Transportation announces maintenance workers have restored travel on several roadways, including: Route 140 in the East Wallingford area, Route 302 in the Groton area (open to one lane only) Route 100 south of Waitsfield (open to local traffic only), Route 12 between Bethel and Randolph, and Route 17 in the Starksboro area (tractor trailers are not recommended). Waters have receded on the Battenkill River and VT 7A in the Town of Arlington is also open for traffic.  In addition, US 7 between Arlington and Manchester is opened now to two-way traffic.  Route 7 in  Brandon and Rutland still has closed areas, but traffic (excluding tractor trailers) can detour around the closed areas. VTrans has also hired four contractors to begin expedited work needed to address the washouts across VT9 between Marlboro and Brattleboro.  Work also began on a portion of VT9 this evening and more work will commence tomorrow. The VTrans district crews are working hard to get resources in place to begin the repair work on all damaged roads and bridges across Vermont.  Priority is being given to re-establishing access to several towns that are cut off due to downed infrastructure. VTrans will continue to notify the press as roads and bridges are being opened, and update the www.511vt.com(link is external) map as well. GMP As of 9 pm on Monday, Green Mountain Power had 1,154 outages, down from 12,000 last night. Crews will be working into the night to restore power. We expect to restore power to all customers  by the end of the day Tuesday, with the exception of those customers who experienced flooding and need electrical inspections before their power can be reconnected. About 150 of the outages were in southern Vermont, while the remainder were in Chittenden, Addison, Washington and Orange counties. Current numbers are available at www.vtoutages.com(link is external). Vermont Emergency Management as of 4:30 MondayEfforts continue around Vermont to clean up and dry out after Sunday’s flooding.  State officials have spent the day ensuring the safety of citizens, assessing damage, and beginning repairs wherever possible. Vermont State Police now say three people have been killed and one is missing as a result of the storm.  A female was killed in the Deerfield River in Wilmington; a man was killed in Mendon after being swept away by floodwaters and his son is still missing and feared dead.  A male in his 40s was found dead in Lake Rescue in Ludlow earlier today. Floodwaters have receded, but most rivers and streams remain above normal levels, and some are still dangerous in many areas.  Vermont officials recommend staying away from rivers that are still high and flowing rapidly.  You should stay out of all floodwaters because of pollutants or debris. Motorists are still encouraged to stay off roadways as many are unsafe and what roads are open are needed by emergency responders, road crews, and utility crews. Road closures are still too numerous to list.  Please call 511 or visit www.511vt.com(link is external) for updated road closures.  The public is asked to NOT call 211 for road closures ‘ those calls are hampering 211’s ability to help those who need shelter or other resources. State Police also ask that you only call 911 if you have an emergency. Around 35,000 power customers are without service.  Restoring power may be slowed for some utilities because of road conditions, so patience will be necessary. Before returning to your flooded home, you must have a licensed electrician inspect your electrical system.  Wet wiring can cause electrocution. Red Cross shelters:Brattleboro ‘ Brattleboro Union High SchoolHartford ‘ Hartford High SchoolBarre ‘ Barre AuditoriumRutland ‘ Rutland High SchoolBennington ‘ Mount Anthony Middle SchoolSpringfield ‘ Springfield High School There are still local shelters, call your community offices for information. Vermont Emergency Management will operate its Emergency Operations Center at the FEMA offices in Burlington at least until the end of the week.  Contact information for the media is 802-951-2708.  The VEM e-mail server is also down; a temporary e-mail address for the press to contact the information office is [email protected](link sends e-mail) .Killington Mountain School Monday nightIrene slammed Vermont with mind-numbing force on Sunday, and Killington is among the areas still cut off from the state highway system.  Pedestrian traffic to Rutland is possible, but vehicles are not currently allowed through.  Route 100 is washed out at numerous points between Killington and Stockbridge and at numerous points further north.  It is also washed out between Killington and Ludlow.  Route 4 between Killington and Woodstock is treacherous at best and passage has been restricted to emergency vehicles.  The Ramshead, Snowshed, and KBL base facilities at Killington received significant storm impact.This may seem like a dire report, but the reality for many of us is far brighter.  KMS did not sustain any wind or water damage during Irene and power returned mid-day Monday after dropping out at 10 p.m. Sunday night.  We consider ourselves lucky to have running water when many in town do not.  With working Internet and cable connections, we are able to stay connected with the outside world.Through those connections, and through travel within the bubble that contains Killington, we know that we are lucky.  Many families have suffered serious losses; I spoke with a women in Stockbridge who had watched her neighbors’ house wash off its foundation and go downstream.  Josef Podnecky, a former KMS chef, lost portions of his roof and some of his tools as the floodwaters surrounded his house; he may have also lost crops due to contamination from the floodwaters.  News reports indicate that the death toll in Vermont has reached three, with another person missing and feared dead.With the devastation around us, we do not plan to open for the ninth-month program as scheduled on September 6.  Instead, we plan to open on September 12, at which point we hope the repair crews’who have been hard at work since the storm struck’will have been able to restore access to the Killington area.  We hope that all of you have come safely through the storm, and we hope that those of you joining us for the ninth-month program will be ready to begin on Monday, September 12.For those of you in the area, if you are safe and your immediate needs are met, please consider volunteering to help with Irene cleanup efforts.  All indications are that as roads open, more opportunities to help will present themselves; vtresponse.com has been set up as a clearinghouse for those in need of help and those able to provide it.  If you are in the Killington “island” and need assistance, please contact me at KMS; we do currently have power as well as working vehicles and will do what we can.  Our landline phones are currently down; my cell has intermittent service (802.324.8307) and email has been the most reliable source of communication ([email protected](link sends e-mail)).For further updates on KMS, the Killington region, and the Vermont response to Irene, please keep an eye on our Facebook page as well as these other resources:Vermont 511’travel information from the Vermont AOTVermont Today’a Rutland Herald blog#vtirene on TwitterThe #VTResponse blog and #vtresponse on Twitter’providing information on ways you can help Vermonters recover from Irenelast_img read more


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first_imgParents do have to stay on the library premises for the program, but not right with their child. The library hopes to start the program in November when the major add-on to the current library wraps up. Library Director Korin Spencer said, “We will be doing an extension of our Wednesday morning story times which is a story, there’ll be crafts, there’ll will be movement and music, but we’re also adding the technology piece, we have recently written a grant and received some new children’s computers, so we will add that and a little bit of education.”The program is free and staff say it’s funded through grants the library has worked to get and will continue working on receiving. TOWN OF FENTON (WBNG) — There’s a new program coming to the Fenton Free Library for young children as they prepare to finish a renovation to the current building.Library staff said Wednesday they they came up with the program, called ‘Barnyard Buddies,’ because the Chenango Valley Pre-K program wasn’t available this year. It will be two days a week for a little more than an hour with just six children each and masks are required. There are already a couple dozen students signed up, but final numbers will be chosen through a lottery system. For more information on the program click here.last_img read more


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first_img(CIDRAP Business Source Osterholm Briefing) – After seeing the pandemic alert level sit at phase 3 for years, suddenly witnessing the World Health Organization (WHO) accelerate from phase 3 to phase 5 in mere days feels terribly unnerving. Unfortunately, it’s the nature of the beast—literally.Influenza viruses are notoriously unpredictable. And now this novel swine-origin virus is proving the case I’ve tried to make for years. If you haven’t already done so, activate your pandemic plan now. All your preparations, your tabletops exercises, your months of meeting and revising and refining are about to prove of great value. If you don’t have a plan, I urge you to move quickly to do as much as you can to get ready.That said, here’s what bears repeating: This virus remains unpredictable. It may surge ahead into a deadly pandemic in days, weeks, or months. Then again, it may fizzle out completely. Or it could disappear for a while, then return in a few months with a vengeance. We all need to practice these words: We just don’t know.Changing to the most useful mindsetProbably the hardest part of this pandemic phase is helping your employees make a psychological adjustment. Panic is a waste of energy. And ignoring the warnings is foolhardy. In other words, this phase is a big deal. Period. No getting around it. Time to get used to that idea.International risk communication consultant, Peter M. Sandman, PhD, Deputy Editor of CIDRAP Business Source, has some useful observations about how the US government has been handling communications with the public. He credits officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for being candid about the facts, though he’d like to see them urge people to make more individual preparations. Still, the gold standard of crisis communication, he says, “is to say alarming things in a calm tone.” Richard Besser, MD, CDC’s acting director, is doing exactly that.That’s an excellent takeaway message for the business community. Be candid and don’t back off from explaining the full range of possibilities. Employees need to understand that coping with the outbreak could be more like a marathon than a sprint.Encourage your employees to do somethingNow is the time to remind employees to take care of their household’s needs: extra food, water, prescription medications, a full tank of gas in the car, and, if possible, cash in their wallets. For both logistical and psychological reasons, everybody should be asked to take action, not simply “cover their cough and watch while the authorities cope,” to quote Peter. It’s much more “calming to prepare.”How will CIDRAP Source help you?We’re just at the beginning of phase 5 and much is still unclear—vaccine manufacturing, when to deploy antivirals, supply-chain issues, and more. We’re watching these developments closely and using our expertise to translate complicated healthcare and scientific information into authoritative, reliable intelligence you can use.To that end, you can expect to receive:Osterholm Briefings, when I can give you helpful context or interpretation or I’m hearing the same question coming from multiple business leadersOsterholm Briefing Updates, which will give you the latest-breaking newsAlerts, when a new development requires immediate actionFor now, we’re going to pay special attention to the categories of Employee Protection, Government Watch, and Communication. We know that you are trying to sort through chaotic messages coming from media outlets that have suddenly taken an interest in what looks to be an emerging pandemic. So we will stay focused on what the latest developments mean to business. And we’ll keep the communication succinct.Expect to see updates like this:Dr. Margaret Chan, head of the WHO, today raised the agency’s pandemic alert level to phase 5, one notch below a full-scale influenza pandemic, signaling that it’s time for all countries to prepare. [Margaret Chan’s statement]The CDC today reported a total of 91 confirmed cases of swine flu in 10 states, with 51 cases in New York City. Besides New York, affected states and case numbers are Arizona, 1; California, 14; Indiana, 1; Kansas, 2; Massachusetts, 2; Michigan, 2; Nevada, 1; Ohio, 1, and Texas, 16. [CDC swine flu page]WHO said it knew of 148 confirmed swine flu cases in nine countries as of 18:00 GMT today. These included 13 in Canada, 91 (with 1 death) in the United States, 26 (with 7 deaths) in Mexico, 2 in Israel, 4 in Spain, 5 in the United Kingdom, 3 in New Zealand, 1 in Austria, and 3 in Germany.A 22-month-old boy from Mexico City died in a Houston, Tex., hospital earlier this week, marking the first swine flu death in the United States and the first outside Mexico, the Texas Department of Health Services (TDHS) reported today. The boy’s close contacts have remained healthy, officials said. [TDHS news release]Germany reported three swine flu cases and Austria reported one, according to a Reuters report today. The patients included a Bavarian couple in their 30s, a 22-year-old woman from Hamburg, and a 28-year-old Austrian.New York and Indiana have received their full allotments of influenza antivirals from the Strategic National Stockpile, and all other states will receive theirs by May 3, Dr. Richard Besser, acting CDC director, said in a press briefing held by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).A “reference strain” of the swine flu H1N1 virus has been isolated by the CDC and sent to vaccine manufacturers, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said at the HHS briefing, adding that limited pilot lots of vaccine could be available for human trials in “early fall.”The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has organized its swine-flu response into an “incident management” structure of seven teams—vaccine, antivirals, personal protective equipment, blood needs, diagnostic research, shortages, and consumer protection—acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Joshua Sharfstein said at the HHS briefing.Only 3 of 14 US swine flu patients with known travel histories had been in Mexico, the CDC said in an MMWR Dispatch last night. Forty of the 64 confirmed cases were not linked to travel or to another confirmed case. [Apr 28 MMWR Dispatch]Between Apr 19 and 27, federal officials checked 15 sick travelers entering the United States from Mexico and confirmed that 2 of them had swine flu, the CDC said in the MMWR Dispatch. Nine travelers remained in isolation pending further evaluation, and four travelers were released.Bottom line for businessPut your plans into action. Help your employees make a critical psychological shift and prepare their households. And stay tuned.last_img read more


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first_imgOPF, the €950m pension fund of copier manufacturer Océ, is planning to join the €31.6bn metal scheme PME on 1 January 2014.To provide its 8,250 participants with a good starting position, employer Canon is willing to grant them an additional contribution, according to the scheme.This “dowry” is to account for the effect of the rights cut of almost 4.1% last August, it added.OPF said the scale of the employer’s donation, as well as the rights to be transferred to PME, would depend on the pension fund’s financial position at year-end. Currently, OPF and Canon are in consultations with PME and the social partners.They still need the approval of the scheme’s participant council and the Dutch regulator.As of the end of August, OPF’s coverage ratio was 103.1%, thanks to the recent rights discount and an additional employer’s contribution of €91m.In June, the scheme’s coverage was 88.8%.PME reported coverage of 98.5% in August.The metal scheme has more than 632,000 participants affiliated with almost 1,300 employers.Its required minimum funding at the end of this year is 105%.last_img read more


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first_imgAP3’s 0.6% gain after costs compared to the 8.8% return it recorded in 2017. In absolute terms, the net result was a SEK2.2m profit in 2018, down from SEK28.2bn a year before.Last week, its Gothenburg-based sister fund AP2 reported a 1.3% loss from its investments for 2018. Sweden’s AP3 posted a 0.6% return last year on the back of private markets and currency investments.The SEK340.7bn (€32.2bn) fund – one of the four main buffer funds backing Sweden’s state pension – said its slim profit illustrated the importance of holding a mix of listed and unlisted assets.Kerstin Hessius, AP3’s chief executive, said: “I am pleased to report a positive return of 0.6% at the end of a year in which equities, our most important asset class, generated a negative contribution to total return of 4.7 percentage points.“However, thanks to our real estate investments, other unlisted assets and our currency positions we succeeded in more than offsetting this weak market return.” Kerstin Hessius, CEO, AP3Hessius highlighted recent investment rule changes for the AP funds, passed by Sweden’s parliament at the end of November, which she said would “promote the integration of sustainable practices and portfolio diversification”.In its annual report, AP3 said that after making payments of SEK6.8m into the pension system during 2018 – down from the SEK7.4m it paid in 2017 – it ended the year with SEK340.7bn of assets in total, down from SEK345.3bn 12 months before.Over the last five years, AP3 has produced an average annual return of 7.8%, while its benchmark income index rose by 2% a year on average.The income index is a reference for keeping pensions in line with average wage increases.last_img read more


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first_imgNJ.com 22 October 2019Family First Comment: “Seeing firsthand how drugs eviscerate urban communities – and understanding how marijuana legalisation will impact the health, education, economic, business, liability and litigation complexities of our densely-populated, metropolitan-bookended state – I fully oppose it. To correct the social injustice of unfair arrests, I support decriminalising the use and possession of small amounts… When I hear my colleagues pushing for legalisation “in the name of social justice,” I can’t apologise for my instinct to suspect that it’s really about helping political friends profit from an industry that should not be allowed a foothold in our state.”Read more facts – https://saynopetodope.org.nz/social-justice/But to me, the most debilitating, depressing and detrimental offense to people of color is the unfair bias of our racist criminal justice system. And nowhere is that more evident than the instances of black and brown people arrested, convicted and incarcerated at a rate three times more than whites for the same small-quantity marijuana infractions. That ratio holds up even in states where recreational marijuana is legal.Seeing firsthand how drugs eviscerate urban communities – and understanding how marijuana legalization will impact the health, education, economic, business, liability and litigation complexities of our densely-populated, metropolitan-bookended state – I fully oppose it. To correct the social injustice of unfair arrests, I support decriminalizing the use and possession of small amounts. It is a common sense compromise where New Jersey can find common ground.Nonetheless, as our entire nation reels with panic over the dangerously high potency of today’s marijuana and the spiraling number of deaths from vaping, our state leaders stubbornly insist on pursuing legalization. It’s equally incomprehensible that while America convulses with an out-of-control opioid epidemic, New Jersey would signal to our children that marijuana should be promoted.When I hear my colleagues pushing for legalization “in the name of social justice,” I can’t apologize for my instinct to suspect that it’s really about helping political friends profit from an industry that should not be allowed a foothold in our state.I call on every black legislative, municipal, civil rights and faith leader in New Jersey to speak out against legalization. I want to remind them that our march for equality has already trudged across 400 long years and that no other ethnic group has had to struggle so hard to move the needle so little. I challenge each of them to step up and define “social justice” with their own voice, their own action and their own leadership rather than accept a diluted definition from those whose ancestors did not arrive as slaves.I want them to uphold the dignity and wellbeing of every New Jerseyan and to remember the insight of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.:We may have all come on different ships, but we’re in the same boat now.State Senator Ronald L. Rice has represented the 28th Legislative District in the New Jersey State Senate since 1986.READ MORE: https://www.nj.com/opinion/2019/10/sen-rice-legalizing-pot-wont-stop-social-injustice-in-the-black-and-brown-community.htmllast_img read more


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first_imgRelatedPosts Minister gives condition for resumption of contact sports Minister pledges support for development of AI, robotics in Nigeria NSF 2020: Sports minister raises fresh hope Forty years after winning the most coveted Football trophy on the continent, Youth and Sports Development Minister, Sunday Dare, has lavished encomium on the victorious 1980 Green Eagles. Exactly 40 years ago on March 22, 1980, the Green Eagles, led by Christian Chukwu, defeated Algeria 3-0 in Lagos to cart home the diadem for the very first time. Speaking on the 40 years anniversary of the victory, Dare said: “We salute the gallantry of the victorious 1980 Nations Cup winning Green Eagles for bringing glory and honour to our fatherland. “Their feat opened a new chapter in the history of Nigerian football and inspired generations of younger players to excel on the field of play. “They not only arrested the attention of world football, they opened opportunities for others to pursue professional football. “A big congratulations to all members of that great team for winning the Nations Cup for the first time on home soil. “Their achievement brings fond memories to us about the never say die Nigerian spirit.” Dare said the Government had planned to celebrate the 40 years anniversary by honouring members of the epoch making team, but this was put on hold due to the outbreak of the covid-19, which led to the suspension of all sporting activities. “We were planning to celebrate this anniversary in style in honour of these great patriots, but due to the Covid-19 scourge, we had to put it on hold. “Once the situation returns to normal, we shall celebrate these worthy Nigerians. “We shall continue to honour those that have won laurels for our great country. “Their immense sacrifice cannot be forgotten.” Speaking in the same vein, Nigerian Football Ambassador, Daniel Amokachi, described the team as more talented than the 1994 Nations Cup Super Eagles squad. Amokachi said: “The 1980 Green Eagles are the most talented Nigerian team. “They were even better than the 1994 squad that a lot of Nigerians considered very talented. “This team is under celebrated. “Imagine a team that had Best Ogedegbe, Kadiri Ikhana, Muda Lawal, Segun Odegbami, Adokiye Amiesimaka, Christian Chukwu, Tunde Bamidele, Alosius Atuegbu and Henry Nwosu among others. “We have not done done justice to these players because there is no archives detailing their achievements. “Television was not too common then, so a lot of younger generation did not watch them play. “Each time I watch the old video, I get inspired. “They deserve to be celebrated more because their achievement encouraged a lot of younger players. “They were not only talented, they were patriots and heroes who opened up opportunities for many younger players. “They have a big space in the history of not only Nigerian Football, but Africa and the world at large. “They can never be forgotten any time the history of football is discussed.”Tags: Christian ChukwuDaniel AmokachiGreen EaglesSunday Darelast_img read more


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