Category: lizjhtsh

Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgAim: An understanding of the non-breeding distribution and ecology of migratory species is necessary for successful conservation. Many seabirds spend the non-breeding season far from land, and information on their distribution during this time is very limited. The black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla, is a widespread and numerous seabird in the North Atlantic and Pacific, but breeding populations throughout the Atlantic range have declined recently. To help understand the reasons for the declines, we tracked adults from colonies throughout the Atlantic range over the non-breeding season using light-based geolocation. Location: North Atlantic. Methods: Geolocation data loggers were deployed on breeding kittiwakes from 19 colonies in 2008 and 2009 and retrieved in 2009 and 2010. Data from 236 loggers were processed and plotted using GIS. Size and composition of wintering populations were estimated using information on breeding population size. Results: Most tracked birds spent the winter in the West Atlantic, between Newfoundland and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, including in offshore, deep-water areas. Some birds (mainly local breeders) wintered in the North Sea and west of the British Isles. There was a large overlap in winter distributions of birds from different colonies, and colonies closer to each other showed larger overlap. We estimated that 80% of the 4.5 million adult kittiwakes in the Atlantic wintered west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, with only birds from Ireland and western Britain staying mainly on the European side. Main conclusions: The high degree of mixing in winter of kittiwakes breeding in various parts of the Atlantic range implies that the overall population could be sensitive to potentially deteriorating environmental conditions in the West Atlantic, e.g. owing to lack of food or pollution. Our approach to estimating the size and composition of wintering populations should contribute to improved management of birds faced with such challenges.last_img read more


Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgOxford Students have begun to participate in Cambridge University’s new game, “bumpsdaq” – an online fantasy stock exchange based on the crews rowing in their May Bumps, writes Christopher Harris. There are currently two players who admit to studying at Oxford University: Stuart Jones, a member of University College’s first VIII, and an anonymous Merton student who goes by the name of Wonbyafoot. Wonbyafoot is currently doing well in 12th place, having more than doubled his or her original £10 000. But Jones is doing even better in 4th, with £45 433.84. The game currently has around 340 players, all of whom buy and sell shares in crews, and receive dividends on races leading up to the May Bumps depending on how well those crews did.ARCHIVE: 3rd Week TT 2003last_img


Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgIS IT TRUE we wonder if the criminal investigation concerning the possible mis-use of Federal Funds by the City of Evansville is still on going or has been closed?  …we look forward to the Investigations Division of Office of the Special Inspection General For The Troubled Asset Relief Program to provide us with the answer to this question in the near future?IS IT TRUE we have been told by a couple of our “Civic Moles” that Alex Burton is considering a run for the Vanderburgh School Board?  …we are pleased to hear that  Mr. Burton is considering such a move?  Alex is an independent thinker,  personable,  hard working and well educated?  …its time for some new faces to serve on this board in hopes that they will stop the practice of cutting political deals behind closed doors?IS IT TRUE we wonder if its legal for elected officials (2) to threaten political candidates who are running for office if they advertise in the CCO they shall work against them?  …we are about ready to find out the answer to this question?IS IT TRUE we wonder if the City of Evansville financial records for 2016 will show us that the city is operating in the black?  …it looks like its time to file a “Freedom of Information Request”  to see if they are?IS IT TRUE that Rep. Todd Rokita  has written a bill to use less fresh foods in school lunches? …we were told that Rep. Rokita has received thousands of dollars from the food processing industry?  …that we believe legislation for more processed foods in school lunches is a disservice to our childrenIS IT TRUE Governor Mike Pence, an attorney, has issued “guidelines” to Emergency Physicians  for writing prescriptions for opioid drugs? …we wonder if the Governor included the Emergency Physicians in writing these guidelines?  …the Governor’s legal decisions of late have not been very successful so we find his decisions on medicine may be suspect?IS IT TRUE that the recent “Media Day” event hosted by Ellis Park was indeed a first class act?  …the answer is a big “YES”?IS IT TRUE we are pleased to announce that CCO is once again getting some valuable information from our Civic Center “MOLES”? …in the near future we shall be sharing some interesting information that members of the Winnecke Administration have attempted to keep from going public?IS IT TRUE we have been told that BRANDON LEE FERGUSON will run for the Vanderburgh County Council seat as a Democrat in the upcoming November 8, 2016 election? …we been told that Mr. Ferguson will be selected in the upcoming June 30, 2016 Democratic caucus as a candidate for the Vanderburgh County?  …we welcome Mr. FERGUSON to the race and known he will turn the Vaanderburgh County Council race into an extremely  competitive and exciting race?FOOTNOTES: Todays “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that Mayor Winnecke will save Mesker Amphitheater from the wreaking ball?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributedFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more


Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgLancashire-based firm Farmhouse Biscuits plans to extend production with a new 29,000sq ft unit at the site of a former mill as sales of its gluten-free biscuits continue to grow.The family-owned company, which employs 200 people at its current 175,000sq ft factory in the centre of Nelson, has secured planning permission to demolish the former Primrose Hill mill next door and build a new plant, offices and warehousing.The new facility, which should be completed by September, will be part of the current site and will initially be used for warehousing, with production lines added as the firm expands.”We’re desperately short of space at our current site and are having to rent warehousing, so it will be good to get everything under one roof,” said MD Philip McIvor.”In the longer term we may add gluten-free production lines to the unit to have a dedicated flour-free area. We’re growing at around 5-6% a year and quite a piece of that is coming from gluten-free.”Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, Farmhouse Biscuits manufactures a range of traditional, gluten-free, sugar-free and seasonal tins of biscuits, supplying department stores, gift shops, farm shops and garden centres, as well as local Asda stores.It also supplies own-label biscuits to Morrisons and exports goods to Australia, North America and Europe.last_img read more


Category: lizjhtsh

first_img Facebook Man stabbed near Notre Dame Ave. and Miner Street in South Bend IndianaLocalNews Pinterest Google+ Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter A man is recovering after being stabbed in the stomach.The stabbing happened around 9 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 22.Southe Bend Police were called to the area of Notre Dame Avenue  and Miner Street where they found the victim who was taken to the hospital, according to WNDU.The suspect took off from the scene.There was no immediate word of any suspect information or details about what led to the stabbing. By Jon Zimney – August 23, 2020 1 352 WhatsApp Google+ Twitter Facebook Previous articleElkhart man shot in back on 16th Street in GoshenNext articleMan, 43, dead, two others hurt after shooting inside Elkhart bar Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more


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first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins took responsibility for the death of junior Declan Sullivan in a Friday afternoon e-mail to the University community. “We are conducting an investigation and we must be careful not to pre-judge its results, but I will say this: Declan Sullivan was entrusted to our care, and we failed to keep him safe,” Jenkins said in the e-mail. “We at Notre Dame — and ultimately I, as President — are responsible. Words cannot express our sorrow to the Sullivan family and to all involved.” Sullivan, a videographer for the football team, died Oct. 27 after the hydraulic scissor lift from which he was filming football practice fell. Jenkins’ e-mail also announced the appointment of Peter Likins, former University of Arizona president, to lead an external review of the Notre Dame’s investigation into Sullivan’s death. Likins is also former president of Lehigh University, according to a University press release issued Friday. In addition to other roles in higher education, he has served as provost at Columbia University, where he was a professor and dean at the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Jenkins did not provide a timeline for the investigation, but said the University would make the results public when they became available. “Investigations and external reviews such as this take time, but I assure you that, when complete, we will issue a public report on the outcome, including information on the events of the afternoon of Oct. 27, any institutional ramifications and recommendations for safety policies in the future,” Jenkins said. Jenkins also expressed support for Head Football Coach Brian Kelly, in reaction to what he called “unfounded and unfair commentary and speculation.” “Coach Kelly was hired not only because of his football expertise, but because we believed his character and values accord with the highest standards of Notre Dame,” Jenkins said. “All we have seen since he came to Notre Dame, and everything we have learned in our investigation to date, have confirmed that belief. For those reasons I am confident that Coach Kelly has a bright future leading our football program.” Finally, the e-mail thanked Notre Dame students, faculty, staff, alumni and parents for concern and prayers following Sullivan’s death. “At the darkest moments, the love, and care, and faith of the Notre Dame family shines most brightly,” he said.last_img read more


Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgA two-semester, graded course sequence, the Moreau First Year Experience helps new students integrate their academic, co-curricular and residential experiences. This year’s class of first years recently completed their diversity and inclusion unit. However, the lesson plan appeared different from that of past years.Andrew Whittington, one of the co-directors of the Moreau program, said one great differences between this year and last year is all those involved in coordinating the course hoped to create a streamline for talking about inclusion and the value of diversity throughout the entire semester.“Regardless if our topics are explicitly on belonging at Notre Dame, or academic success or academic rigor, the spirit of inclusion is present in that conversation even if it is not specifically titled that,” Whittington said.Moreau advisers have been trained to use a dosing technique in which they are constantly introducing language, the Notre Dame community values and ways to engage in difficult conversations throughout the entire semester, so that when they move into more specific discussions, the topics are not entirely brand new to the first year students.Lauren Donahue, co-director of the Moreau program, explained her team has decided to take more of the micro lens to approaching diversity, which prompts students to conduct a deep introspection look into who they are, their identities and what is most salient for them.“This self-awareness enables them to be more open and to consider other identities and experiences, and how they differ from them[selves],” Donahoe said.In addition to starting at that micro level and talking about the students’ identities first, another change this year is when the course addressed implicit bias, which is usually taught in the spring semester. Donahue believes introducing topics early on, then revisiting them, allows the first years to have a more foundational, shared experience.“Last week’s lesson on diversity and inclusion has been really helpful in transitioning into a community that I am not used to,” first year Caroline Bender said. “It’s taught me a lot about how to live in a community with so much diversity and how to grow in this community.”She said her Moreau class focused on talking about different strategies, like having civil discussions with people who may not share similar beliefs or are from different backgrounds.Bender said one thing her class really emphasized was civil discourse and how to have respectful conversations to foster growth not division.Bender and her classmates were provided various strategies on how to speak with people from different backgrounds in a respectful manner. She learned conversation tips she had not previously considered.“I think it really helps to have these strategies, so that we are able to use them in everyday conversations,” Bender said.First year Eleanor Rey also spoke highly of last week’s course material, saying it was different, but eye opening.Rey said her professor placed an emphasis on microaggressions, teaching what they are and how people tend to frequently overlook them.“I realized how much I use microaggressions in daily life and how easy it is to stop using them, and to use a different type of language if you are curious about someone else’s culture,” Rey explained. “By doing this, you avoid hurting someone else’s feelings and invite community-building, instead of breaking down another with microaggressions, which most of the time are made without ill intentions.”While the topic of diversity and inclusion can be a sensitive subject for some students to speak about, Rey and Bender said their Moreau advisers had done a great job in making their discussions comfortable for them.Rey said her Moreau teacher has made it easy for her and her classmates to talk in class. She said he always speaks first after posing a question to the class, making the students feel comfortable in what can be a very nerve-racking period for the new college students.“We are really open in our Moreau class. We talk about everything and anything,” Rey said. “My adviser is the best. I find it extremely easy to share my thoughts with the class, and I think they feel the same way.”Tags: Diversity, first years, inclusion, moreaulast_img read more


Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgThe advent of a new year is typically greeted with a resolution, some new goal – or perhaps an old goal revisited – that will result in a positive change.After reading the story of Leo Welch, my resolution for 2014 has changed. Gone are thoughts of getting outside more, losing a few pounds, or reducing the amount of time I spend on Facebook.Instead, I am simplifying. I hereby resolve to remember that there is no time like the present.Mississippi blues man Leo Welch is my inspiration. Last week, at the ripe young age of 81, Welch released his debut album, Sabougla Voices. Welch’s record came to be because, as an octogenarian, he grasped that simple concept – there is no time like the present. Welch, a longtime gospel blues player, picked up the phone and cold called the folks at Big Legal Mess, a Mississippi record label with juke joint all stars like Junior Kimbrough and Fred McDowell on its roster, and pitched his record.Instead of being turned down, which is what most of us what probably assume would happen at the end of most calls like this, Welch found himself with an invitation to come down to the label’s office to pick some tunes.Welch is, indeed, a fine musician; he plays guitar, harmonica, and fiddle, and once even had the opportunity to audition to B.B. King, though tough financial times kept Welch from making the trip to Memphis for the tryout.Sabougla Voices has the rough and ragged feel of a Mississippi juke joint blues jam, though Welch honed his craft playing in churches, which – these days – vastly outnumber the of juke joins in Mississippi. The songs on the record are honest and real, alternating between rollicking, electrified numbers like “Take Care Of Me Lord” and “Somebody Touched Me” to acoustic tunes like “The Lord Will Make A Way” and “Mother Loves Her Children.” Nowhere on any of these tracks is there an ounce of pretension. Instead, Welch sings of trial and tribulation, faith and praise, with both the confidence of the blues world’s greats and the repentant soul of a sinner.As I have listened to Sabougla Voices over the last few weeks, I cannot help but think of this 80-year-old man picking up the phone, dialing a record label, and pitching a record. Carpe diem, indeed. I want to latch on to the spirit that led to Welch’s phone call, as it is a definite reminder that there is no time like the present. If you have something you want to do, do it. Make the phone call. Climb the mountain. Run the river.That’s excellent advice for a brand new year.Make sure to check out “Praise His Name,” the lead cut from Sabougla Voices, on this month’s Trail Mix.  For more information on Leo Welch, surf over to www.biglegalmessrecords.com.last_img read more


Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgI have a good friend who regularly refers to Elliot Root as “he.”And it drives me bananas.Elliot Root is not a “he.” Just like Jethro Tull isn’t a “he.” Just like Steely Dan isn’t a “he.” Just like Lynyrd Skynyrd (sort of) isn’t a “he.”Instead, Elliot Root is a band. A “they,” if you will. And I cannot emphasize enough how incredible I think they are.Few bands have resonated with me, over the last two years, the way Elliot Root has. If you were to check out my Spotify plays, my stats would be dominated by Elliot Root songs. You might think that, for weeks on end, I listened to little else.And you’d be right.The two EPs Elliot Root has released offer tremendous songwriting and a universally approachable sound. My wife digs them. My 17 year old son digs them. My 9 year old son digs them. My friends dig them, with one musical buddy recently offering the observation that Elliot Root simply hasn’t written a song he doesn’t like. That’s a double negative I can stand by.This week, Elliot Root will finally release their first full length record, Conjure. I have anticipated very few records like I have this one, with each released track whetting my appetite for the whole thing.Elliot Root is a band that has it. A nebulous thing, it is really hard to describe what it is. But I know it when I hear it.And they have it.I recently chatted with singer Scott Krueger about the new record, touring with Dwight Yoakam, and getting lost.BRO – Thanks for chatting, but I was hoping to talk to Mr. Root . . .SK – Oh, I didn’t know. Let me grab him for you!BRO – After putting out a couple EPs, how does it feel to have a long player out there?SK – It’s great to be able to do a full length album. It’s something we’ve been building towards for a while. We always wanted to have an “album” album, a cohesive piece of art that we could tell a story with.BRO – I know you guys spent some time on the road with Dwight Yoakam this summer. At first glance, it seems like an interesting pairing. How as that run of shows?SK – It was definitely an interesting pairing. We were quite surprised to hear that he asked us to join him on the road for a bit. We had a great time and Dwight and his crew treated us very well. The crowds were a bit surprised to see a band like us opening, but it was a challenge to try and connect with them and win them over every night.BRO – We are featuring “Lost Man Running” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?SK – This is a song about being okay with admitting that we can feel lost sometimes. I feel like we have pushed further and further in our culture towards a place where it is harder to admit when you feel lost or need a little help. I wanted to write something that I hoped people could resonate with and maybe find comfort in, knowing that someone else knows what their situation feels like.BRO – What’s your favorite city to get lost in?SK – We get to travel to a lot of cool places, so this answer is likely to change from time to time. Right now, I’d have to say my favorite place to get lost in this last year has been Washington, D.C. I don’t know why, but it has a really strange and surreal feeling. For all the power that the city holds, it actually is kind of quiet and neatly organized. It reminds me that behind all the crazy politics is a humanity. Even in the tense political times we are living in now, that gives me hope.Elliot Root will be celebrating the release of Conjure on Friday at the Red Brick Roads Music & Arts Festival in Clinton, Mississippi. Dates in Nashville and Bristol follow soon after.For more information on Elliot Root, the new record, or when they will hit a stage near you, surf on over to the band’s website.last_img read more


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first_imgAlkira has sold for $4 million.IT’S been listed with various agents on and off since 2013 and the asking price chopped and changed during that time, but property records now reveal the final sale price for one of Queensland’s more unusual and outstanding homes.Known as Alkira the home in Cape Tribulation has sold in a deal worth $4 million to a company owned by Victorian accountant David Brandi.The futuristic home was launched for sale in 2013 with a $14 million price tag.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours agoIt was relisted in June 2015 for $15 million before the asking price was dropped to $8.8 million in mid 2016.The home is on a 29.5 ha parcel of land which sits between the Great Barrier Reef and the Wet Tropics world heritage area.It is surrounded by rainforest and has more than 600 metres of absolute beach frontage and mountain views.It has its own helicopter pad and the swimming pool was shaped to reflect the owner’s favourite stamp the One Pound Jimmy.It was previously owned by philatelist Rod Perry and his wife Marider.The home won two Australian Institute of Architects awards for its designer Charles Wright and was a finalist in the World Architecture Festival 2014.last_img read more


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