Category: nzoxrplv

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first_imgPosition Details Salary RangeTBD according to Adjunct Faculty Contract Required Qualifications Specific Job Duties * How did you hear about this employment opportunity?Public Job PostingInternal Job PostingAgency ReferralAdvertisement/PublicationPersonal ReferralWebsiteOther Open Date10/28/2019 Preferred Qualifications Job TitleAdjunct Instructor – Automotive Technology Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsResumeCover LetterTranscriptsOptional DocumentsLetters of RecommendationCurriculum VitaeEvaluations (for Faculty)OtherSpecialized Certifications The adjunct instructor will teach Automotive Technology courses toa diverse student population. These courses will be offered duringthe day and evening. The responsibilities and duties of theinstructor may change as the needs of the college arise. Posting NumberADJ00080PU Open Until FilledYes Close Date Job Summary * How many years of experience do you possess?Less than 1 year1 to 3 years3 to 5 years5 to 7 yearsMore than 7 years Special Instructions to Applicants Desired Start Date08/24/0020 Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). • Utilize departmental syllabus template, approved textbooks, andsupplemental course materials.• Submit personalized course syllabus to Deans’ Office inelectronic format one (1) week prior to course start date.• Distribute and review comprehensive course syllabus to studentsno later than the first week of the course.• Receive, understand, and follow Course Data Form as distributedby Deans’ Office.• Adhere to printed course schedule meeting times andlocations.• Obtain prior approval for any substitute teachers or guestspeakers from Deans’ Office.• Maintain grade book in electronic or hard copy format.• Take and record student Attendance each day.• Submit accurate and certified Tenth (10th) Day AttendanceVerification and Mid-Semester Class Roster or other report toDeans’ Office• Give final exam at the time and date indicated on the college’sFinal Exam Schedule.• Respond to e-mails from students, staff, and collegeadministrators in a timely manner while classes are in sessionusing assigned college designated e-mail.• Check assigned college mailbox regularly.• Perform other duties and special projects as assigned A.A.S. Degree in Automotive Technology or related field.Minimum of 5 years related Automotive Experience. ASE MasterCertification with G1. Maintain 20 hours of technical updatetraining per year.Must be able to demonstrate the Morton College core values ofcompassion, fairness, respect, responsibility, tolerance andtruth. Posting Details Experience teaching at a College level. B.S. Degree in AutomotiveTechnology. Ford Motor Company training and credentials. * What is the highest degree completed?H.S. DiplomaAssociatesBachelorsMastersPhD Position End Date (if temporary) Reports To and Evaluated byDean of Adult and Career Technical Educationlast_img read more


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first_img London Press Office (national media and London area enquiries only – not questions about personal claims) 020 3267 5144 Disability Living Allowance (DLA) Personal Independence Payment (PIP) the support component of Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) Follow DWP on: Read the latest benefit cap statistics Scotland (local media enquiries) 0131 310 1122 England and Wales (local media enquiries) 029 20 586 then 097 or 098 or 099 Out-of-hours (journalists only) 07623 928 975 Press Office Caxton HouseTothill StreetLondonSW1H 9NA Every child deserves the best start in life, and we know that children living in a household with someone in work do better in school, have better educational attainment and are more likely to have a job later in life than children growing up in a home where no one works. This new analysis into the number of children in workless families reducing under the benefit cap, shows how our welfare reforms are transforming lives by giving children real-life working role models in their families. In the past there could have been families living in cycles of worklessness without the proper support or incentives to move into work with the security and peace of mind that comes from a regular wage. We now have record employment in the UK with more than 1,000 people moving into jobs each and every day since 2010. The unemployment rate (4.2%) has not been lower since 1975, and the number of people out of work is down by 136,000 compared to a year ago. On average, 1,000 people have moved into jobs every day since 2010.Work remains the best route out of poverty – around 75% of children in poverty leave poverty altogether when their parents move into full employment. Evaluation from the original cap shows lone parents were 51% more likely to go into work after a year than similar uncapped households.In Universal Credit, claimants are exempt from the benefit cap if they earn at least £542 a month, equivalent to 16 hours at the National Living Wage. Working parents can also claim up to 85% of their eligible childcare costs, regardless of hours worked and how old the youngest child is. Facts and figuresThe benefit cap is set at £20,000 a year outside London and £23,000 in Greater London to reflect higher rent costs.Anyone working and receiving Working Tax Credit is exempt from the cap, as are households where someone receives: New analysis also shows that around 170,000 children are now living with a working adult as a result.Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey today welcomed the new analysis as evidence that the cap is helping to transform lives by giving children “working role models in their families”.The benefit cap is a limit on the total amount of benefit that working age people can get – introduced in 2013 to restore fairness to the welfare system. It incentivises work, including part-time work, as anyone eligible who moves into work and then earns enough for Working Tax Credit (or the equivalent under Universal Credit) becomes exempt.Since the introduction of the cap in April 2013, 180,000 households have had their benefits capped. With 48,000 households having moved into work.Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey said: Twitter – www.twitter.com/dwppressoffice Facebook – www.facebook.com/dwp LinkedIn – www.linkedin.com/company/dwp YouTube – www.youtube.com/dwp Those claiming Carer’s Allowance or Guardian’s Allowance are exempt from the cap.The figures cited above refer to households who had their Housing Benefit capped.The estimate of the number of children in households that were capped but are now in work is calculated by multiplying the number of children in these households by the number of households.Households with more than 5 children are grouped together, so for this calculation we have assumed that there are 6 children in these households.Contact Press Officelast_img read more


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first_imgBrands need to focus on their core products rather than striving for constant innovation, according to a top United Biscuits (UB) executive. Mark Winter, sales director at UB, was speaking at yesterday’s IGD Convention, which focused on disruption, covering technology, innovation and leading and retailing in times of disruption.While many speakers pushed the need to embrace new digital breakthroughs and innovation, Winter argued that “technology is not the answer” and “innovation is not just about new products”. According to research firm Nielsen’s figures, just one in 2,000 new launches succeed and, out of 12,000 consumer products launched between 2011 and 2013, just seven achieved “breakthough disruption”.Winter also advised delegates that customers cannot tell you what they want in terms of innovation, quoting Ford Motor Company founder Henry T Ford: “If I’d asked my customers what they wanted, they would have asked for a faster horse.”He used the successful launch of breakfast biscuits as an example of how innovation was not always the answer. “The breakfast biscuit launch was incredibly disruptive to the world of cereal bars, offering great value at half the price of a cereal bar,” he said.“They have helped create a £100m category in just three years. They were not a technological breakthrough – biscuits have been in the market since the 1920s.”Instead, he argued that the success of the launch was down to products and brands positioned well against how people are now living their lives.“Innovation is not just about new products – you can be equally disruptive on core products,” he added.Building on core productsMcVitie’s chocolate digestives have been in the market for more than 80 years, but in the last year the brand “has been incredibly disruptive”, claimed Winter, with growth up 12%, brand awareness up 6% and brand regard up 8%. This was down to a change of packaging to make it easier for consumers to open, the addition of more chocolate to “get it into more occasions”, as well as advertising.“If the only constant in the market is change and you don’t continue to make your core products more relevant to consumers, you’ll die, because we live in a very competitive market,” said Winter.“Execution is the ultimate differentiator between success and failure. Successful businesses allow the cannibalisation of existing products – if you don’t, then someone else will come along and cannibalise your products,” he concluded.last_img read more


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first_imgThe beloved soul star Jim James continued his Eternally Even tour in Louisville, Kentucky on Friday night for a hometown show at the Palace Theatre. The My Morning Jacket frontman, backed by Twin Limb & co, performed a thirteen song set of originals and a seven song encore that was full of socially conscious references and subliminal messages.The Woody Guthrie original, popularized by the New Multitudes‘ “Changing World” opened the second portion of the evening with a distinct call-to-action by just James and his guitar in the center stage. “Change the pen and change the ink / Change the way you talk and think,” the chorus rung. He then went into an a cappella performance of “The Times They Are A-Changing” by Bob Dylan before the rest of the band joined in for “Of The Mother Again”, Monster Of Folk‘s “Dear God”, The Velvet Underground‘s “I’m Set Free”, The New Basement Tapes‘ “Down On The Bottom”, “State Of The Art (A.E.I.O.U.)”, and a set-closing “Give Peace A Chance” by the Plastic Ono Band.Thanks to YouTube User Go See Live Music, you can watch some highlight performances from the Louisville Palace Theatre show below:“Changing The World” > “The Times They Are A-Changing”“I’m Set Free”“Eternally Even”“We Ain’t Gettin Any Younger” Edit this setlist | More Jim James setlists[Photo via @vasquez_photography]last_img read more


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first_imgComing to Eureka Springs, AR from June 30th through July 2nd, the annual Highberry Music Festival today revealed their initial artist lineup. The festival has put together a lineup with an emphasis on jam-friendly music, including headlining sets from The Floozies and Dark Star Orchestra.The whole lineup is full of great music, including Dopapod, The Nth Power, Aqueous, Jade Cicada, Old Shoe, Aaron Kamm & The One Drops, Opal Agafia & The Sweet Nothings, and Phriends Of The Family. This is just an initial announcement too, so there’s plenty more exciting music still to come!This year marks Highberry’s first year at Eureka Springs, and we can’t wait to see what they have in store. You can see the festival’s announcement below, and head to their website for more information.last_img read more


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first_imgRock guitarist Tom Morello, best known for his tenures with Rage Against The Machine and Audioslave, has released a new reimagined version of his song, “Every Step That I Take”, featuring rock outfit Portugal. The Man and rapper Vic Mensa. Originally released on Morello’s 2018 album, The Atlas Underground, the new version of “Every Step That I Take” is available exclusively through Amazon Music.“Vic Mensa, Portugal. The Man, and I did an acoustic reimagining of ‘Every Step That I Take’ off my album The Atlas Underground,” Morello explains. “Was so great collaborating with these super talented friends. The sonic conspiracy continues!”John Gourley, frontman of Portugal. The Man adds, “Tom and I did this acoustically once before and it was great. But Vic Mensa really blew me away with what he did on this recording.”Listen to Tom Morello’s reimagined “Every Step That I Take” release featuring Portugal. The Man and Vic Mensa below:Tom Morello ft. Portugal. The Man & Vic Mensa – “Every Step That I Take”After embarking on an interactive speaking tour, Morello recently got back to his regular live concert configuration after debuting his new show at SXSW. Morello’s 2019 tour includes an immersive live production designed by creative director Sean Evans and features material from Morello’s recent The Atlas Underground studio release. The Atlas Underground features a hybrid blend of rock, hip-hop, and electronic elements, so it comes as no surprise that Morello partnered up with some unlikely candidates for his most recent studio endeavor. Following his headlining tour, Morello will join Muse on all three of their U.K. stadium dates this June.See below for a full list of Tom Morello’s 2019 tour dates. For ticketing and more information, head to Tom Morello’s website.Tom Morello 2019 Tour Dates:May 11, 2019 Louisville, KY Mercury BallroomMay 12, 2019 Rockingham, NC Epicenter FestivalMay 14, 2019 New York, NY Irving PlazaMay 15, 2019 Norfolk, VA The NorvaMay 17, 2019 Columbus, OH Sonic Temple Art + Music FestivalMay 18, 2019 Buffalo, NY Town BallroomMay 19, 2019 Columbia, MD DC101 Kerfuffle / Merriweather Post PavilionJune 1, 2019 London, UK London Stadium*June 3, 2019 Nottingham, UK Rescue RoomsJune 5, 2019 Bristol, UK Ashton Gate Stadium*June 8, 2019 Manchester, UK Etihad Stadium*June 15, 2019 Tinley Park, IL 101WKQX Piqniq*with MuseView Tour Dateslast_img read more


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first_imgOut of nearly 10,000 Harvard employees, their efforts stand out. They are the one-half of 1 percent, putting in 110 percent.A juggling janitor, an inspirational minister, an all-star fundraiser, and a dining hall checker were among 49 University employees feted at Sanders Theatre on Tuesday as Harvard Heroes, a longstanding tradition at the University that returned this spring after a three-year hiatus.“We’re all inspired by you, by your dedication to Harvard’s mission and your commitment to excellence,” President Drew Faust said at the ceremony, which was followed by a private reception for honorees at the Harvard Faculty Club. “You have given the best of yourselves to us each and every day. … Thanks to your knowledge, your heart, your hard work, Harvard is a better place to be, a better place to work, a better place to study, a better place to create enduring knowledge, a better place to promote understanding and build a better world.”The 17-year-old program — now University-wide for the first time — is unique in bridging employees of all levels across Harvard. Heroes can work in the boiler room or the boardroom, carrying out their tasks with the click of a mouse or the snap of a mousetrap, said Katie Lapp, Harvard’s executive vice president.“A Harvard Hero need not wear a suit,” Lapp told the crowd. “A Harvard Hero does not need to hold a lofty title or have an office with a door that shuts.”Indeed, the heroes’ achievements were broad. Some spearheaded high-profile projects. Sharon Black, director of planning in Harvard Business School Operations, shepherded the Harvard Innovation Lab from conception to completion; Lucinda O’Neill, creative director in Alumni Affairs and Development, designed the now-ubiquitous Harvard 375 logo, working “at warp speed when Harvard’s 375th anniversary went from a historical footnote to a yearlong celebration,” Faust said.Others tackled their day-to-day duties with integrity and aplomb. John Martin, a checker at Annenberg Hall, is quick to offer a warm smile or encouraging word to incoming freshmen each day. Carlos Guerrero, assistant crew chief for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences’ custodial staff, is rumored “to have more than two hands,” Faust said.Rafael Casiano and Kathleen Goldstein, two of the 49 Harvard Heroes, stand as their accomplishments are honored.Some stepped up to the plate in another hero’s absence. When the late Rev. Peter J. Gomes fell ill, the Rev. Wendel W. “Tad” Meyer came out of retirement to serve as acting minister of the Memorial Church. As Gomes struggled with the illness that ultimately ended his life in February 2011, Meyer “provided guidance and comfort to a worried and then grieving community,” Faust said.One honoree was a hero in the more traditional sense. George O’Dell, a property operations assistant in Harvard Real Estate Services, quickly evacuated a Longwood-area University apartment complex occupied by students with small children during a fire, ensuring minimal damage to their homes and perhaps saving lives.The ceremony brought out hundreds of supporters, from family members to co-workers to proud deans. (William Graham, who is stepping down as dean of Harvard Divinity School after 10 years on the job, was there to cheer on Susan Worst, the School’s assistant director for administrative and Web systems in IT/Media Services. “It’s a really nice event,” he said.)Several heroes had vocal cheering sections. Matthew Weber, a new and social media officer at Harvard Graduate School of Education, drew the loudest applause, for creating Harvard’s first “It Gets Better” video.The heroes themselves seemed a bit stunned by the attention (though not as stunned as they appeared in an outtakes video played at the event, which showed each being informed of the award with flowers, departmental applause, or surprise visits from HR representatives).“It’s a big honor,” said Rafael Casiano, a reprographics assistant at the Harvard Law School Copy Center. “You do your work not expecting stuff like this. To me, it’s my job. You think that people don’t notice. But it’s nice that people recognize what we do.”Of course, Casiano’s nomination was obvious to members of the Law School community, who rely on his keen proofreading eye and creativity on printing jobs ranging from conference materials to exhibits for students’ presentations in mock courtrooms to the photography that hangs in the halls of the new WCC building.As Faust said of Casiano, “Others may try to copy you, but you’re truly an original” — a sentiment no doubt true of his fellow heroes, too.To view the 2012 Harvard Heroes, visit HARVie. A Harvard ID is required.last_img read more


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first_imgA group of parents filed a lawsuit in late July challenging the tenure policies governing public school teachers in New York state. The parents have the backing of — and some observers say are a proxy for — the Partnership for Educational Justice, an advocacy group founded and promoted by former television journalist Campbell Brown. Earlier this month, Brown’s organization garnered national attention after announcing that David Boies, the high-profile litigator who helped overturn California’s same-sex marriage ban and represented former Vice President Al Gore in Bush v. Gore, had signed on as its chairman of the board. The lawsuit is the first of what many analysts expect will be numerous legal challenges around the country following a landmark decision in June by a California Superior Court judge who struck down the tenure system there as unconstitutional under state law, saying it unfairly saddled students in high-needs schools with low-performing teachers. Proponents of tenure reform say that job protections such as seniority, tenure, and dismissal processes too often shield ineffective teachers at the expense of students in disadvantaged schools who don’t receive a first-class education. But critics say the lawsuits are smokescreens that conceal a politically motivated effort to bust teachers’ unions and expand the growing privatization of public education.Thomas Kane is the Walter H. Gale Professor of Education and a professor of economics at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), and faculty director of the Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard University. Kane directed the Measures of Effective Teaching project for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which studied issues facing K-12 and higher education, such as the design of school accountability systems, and teacher recruitment and retention. He was an expert witness for the plaintiffs in Vergara v. California.Kane spoke with the Gazette about the tenure debate and where it’s likely headed. GAZETTE: What do you think of the arguments from both sides?KANE: The substantive question is whether the due-process requirements set out in tenure laws are necessary to protect teachers against arbitrary management decisions. Each side has been questioning the motives of the other. But the real question is: Are these due-process requirements necessary to protect the teachers from arbitrary managerial decisions? Is there another way to ensure that hiring and firing decisions are made on the basis of quality of teaching, and not personal relationships or favoritism? If the job protections are excessive, then we shouldn’t care who’s funding the lawsuits.There were three different issues that the plaintiffs were challenging in California. First, under state law, tenure decisions had to be made within 18 months. The plaintiffs argued that by rushing the decision, we’re making a lot more mistakes than are necessary. Moreover, the plaintiffs challenged the due-process requirements for teachers who have been given tenure. Those are higher and more onerous and more costly than for every other public employee in California. The Vergara decision would not eliminate due-process requirements; it would just extend to teachers the same due-process rights that every other public employee in California has. Third, the plaintiffs challenged the state law requiring schools to do any layoffs based on seniority alone, not teaching quality. Prior to the lawsuit, any superstar second- or third-year teacher had to be laid off prior to the least-effective, more senior teacher. The question is, “Do such laws benefit kids, or are they purely for the sake of adults?”For the last four decades, research has been telling us that individual teachers have huge effects on student outcomes. It’s not so much what school your child goes to, but which teacher in that school he or she is assigned to that matters. It matters not just for test scores, but as Raj Chetty [of Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences], John Friedman [of the Harvard Kennedy School], and Jonah Rockoff [of Columbia Business School] recently showed, for their earnings later. Moreover, we’ve learned that it’s hard to predict who the effective teachers are going to be based on the information observed during recruitment. A teacher’s later effectiveness is only weakly related to what college they went to, or what grades they got, or whether or not they have a teaching credential. So teachers matter, but it’s hard to predict who the great teachers are going to be until they are on the job. That’s the core challenge.The unions ask: What’s wrong with making decisions about who the effective teachers are in the first 18 months? The problem is that managers have only seen one year of student achievement gains. They’ve seen one year’s worth of classroom observations. They could make a much better decision about which teachers to retain for tenure if they had an extra few years of data. In higher education, we wait seven to nine years typically.GAZETTE: What about the critics’ claims, like union busting. Is that valid?KANE: That may be effective in rallying their base. But it’s a smokescreen, a distraction. Why not just defend the policy? Is it in children’s interest to make teacher-tenure decisions in 18 months? Is it in children’s interests to create extraordinary due-process hurdles after 18 months? Is it in children’s interests to make layoff decisions base solely on seniority? I think they struggle to make that case.GAZETTE: The advocacy group behind the New York lawsuit says that the “least effective” teachers are disproportionately working in disadvantaged schools. Is this accurate, and why is that?KANE: That varies from district to district and state to state. Moreover, it’s a hard question to answer. When you’re using any measure — student achievement or a classroom observation — to infer whether or not a given teacher is effective, you obviously want to control for students’ prior achievement. But do you also control for students’ income and race? Some people would say, “Yes, you have to control for such factors because they are indirect measures of the kinds of academic stimulation and support students are receiving outside of school. On the other hand, if you do control for student income or race, you could be attributing to students’ background any systematic differences in the quality of teachers assigned to such students.The only way to sort it out is if you have a given teacher who has taught lots of different types of students — high-income, low-income, African-American, white, Latino — where you can disentangle the effect of a specific teacher from the effect of students’ backgrounds. It is plausible that low-income and minority students are assigned the least effective teachers. I’ve seen evidence that is true in Los Angeles, for instance, but it’s not necessarily true everywhere. One would have to provide evidence that was the case.GAZETTE: The group attributes low test scores to ineffective teachers. How much of a correlation is there, if any, between the two, and what metrics are most reliable to determine who’s at fault for poor student achievement?KANE: Teachers definitely have an effect on student achievement. That’s true for low-income kids, and that’s true for high-income kids. At the same time, most of the difference in achievement between low-income and high-income students is not due to differences in teacher quality. Even in places where low-income and minority students are disproportionately assigned less-effective teachers, such differences explain only a small share of the total difference in performance between high-income and low-income students.That said, if we actively assigned our best teachers to our lowest-income and disadvantaged students, we could use teacher quality as a tool to substantially close the achievement gap. Just the fact that teacher quality is not the sole driver of the problem doesn’t mean it couldn’t be an important part of closing the gap. Nevertheless, it’s probably politically impractical to expect middle- and higher-incomes parents to sign up to that. We need policies for raising the average effectiveness of teachers.GAZETTE: Is the timely termination of underperforming teachers routinely difficult for administrators? And if so, is this a national problem or something largely confined to states where unions are especially powerful or tenure systems are poorly designed?KANE: This is not solely an issue in unionized states. In most school districts, administrators have leeway during the probationary period to lay teachers off based on effectiveness. The period varies in length. In California, it was just 18 months, but in other places it’s three or four or even five years. I think the reasonable resolution here is to leave enough time during the probationary period to identify who the effective teachers are. Moreover, school districts need to use that time productively, to assemble data on student achievement, classroom observations, and, ideally, student evaluations. They should ensure that tenure is a real hurdle. Post-tenure, I think it is reasonable for teachers to expect reasonable due-process rights. But in many places, we’ve gone beyond reasonable due process.The key issue is the availability of valid measures of teaching effectiveness. When those are available, it’s much easier to ensure that teachers are treated fairly. It’s when such measures are not available that we need extreme due-process requirements to be sure that decisions are not being made based on personal vendettas and favoritism. The only way out of the quandary is to ensure that there are ways to assess teachers’ effectiveness.To defend its laws in Vergara, the state of California had to contradict itself. First, it needed to argue that school districts had perfect information during the probationary period, so that whenever any ineffective teacher got tenure, it was the fault of school district leadership, not the law. Then, to defend the last-in, first-out laws, they had to make an about-face and argue that districts knew nothing about effectiveness after tenure, that using seniority was the only way to ensure that favoritism was not the basis of retention decisions.The obvious truth is that it is possible to assemble evidence on teachers’ effectiveness, but that such data will be imperfect, both before and after tenure. The right resolution is to improve the quality of our teacher-evaluation and feedback systems. That would allow schools to ensure high standards at tenure time and to protect teachers from favoritism with transparency, rather than lengthy due-process requirements, which end up protecting a lot of ineffective teachers.GAZETTE: Are there policy changes that should take place in the way teachers are typically evaluated and retained, especially in high-needs schools?KANE: Many school districts are being much more careful about which teachers actually get tenure, to make sure that tenure is an affirmative decision and not just a default decision. That’s the common ground. Teachers’ unions ought to be supporting efforts to raise the standards for tenure because it makes the job protections following tenure more legitimate. If the tenure decision were made on the basis of effectiveness, then there’ll be fewer cases of the very ineffective teachers who are afforded unreasonable due-process rights.We must also recognize that some ineffective teachers will earn tenure, that somebody who’s effective early in their career sometimes fall off track. There should be reasonable due-process requirements for schools to make layoff decisions even after tenure. That will be more difficult for unions to support, but I believe that’s going to be the result from all these cases. Districts will do a better job collecting evidence during the probationary period, and making better tenure decisions. Moreover, districts will do a better job evaluating and providing feedback to teachers after tenure, so employment decisions can be made on the basis of the quality of instruction. And the extraordinary measures we took in the past to guard against favoritism will be less necessary.GAZETTE: What are the costs and benefits of giving administrators or local school boards greater or even total autonomy to hire and fire teachers?KANE: As the political favoritism in hiring probation officers in Massachusetts recently showed us, due-process requirements are appropriate in public hiring. But there are unreasonable forms of due process. When it costs a district $500,000, as Los Angeles demonstrated during the trial, to deal with each tenured teacher who was ineffective, we’ve gone too far. I totally agree that there should be safeguards to ensure teachers are not subject to arbitrary dismissals, but we can have a reasonable discussion about how high those safeguards need to be. That’s what the argument should be right now.GAZETTE: How do you see this debate playing out?KANE: Here’s what I hope happens: In states around the country, teachers’ unions will recognize that they have an interest in making sure the tenure review process is rigorous and subject to high standards. I also think that teachers will keep reasonable due-process rights, where principals are not able to simply hire their friends. School leaders will be able to make retention decisions based on valid measures such as student-achievement growth and classroom observations and student evaluations. Due-process requirements will be streamlined but not eliminated.Some have wondered why there’s not been a groundswell of support from the majority of teachers who, after all, bear the burden of ineffective colleagues. They say, “Only the least effective 10 percent of teachers have anything to fear from eliminating last-in, first-out rules and reducing due-process.”Those who ask overlook the fact that in the absence of meaningful teacher evaluations in the past, most teachers don’t know how they will fare under the new systems. Until the new evaluations are in place, a majority of teachers will fear that they could be put in the bottom 10 percent! In other words, such uncertainty tends to favor the status quo. It will be a rocky few years.This interview has been edited for clarity and length.last_img read more


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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Kern County Fire DepartmentALBANY — A third Department of Environmental Conservation crew is traveling to Denver, where they will be assigned to assist firefighting efforts underway in western states and two additional DEC Forest Rangers are being deployed to fight wildland fires in California.New York State Gov. Andrew Cuomo also welcomed home the state’s second team of 10 DEC Forest Rangers, staff, and volunteers, including Robert Rogers, Forest Ranger from Cattaraugus County.The crew has been helping battle and contain wildland fires raging in western states for the past two weeks. These trained, expert firefighters helped battle the Cameron Peak Fire near Red Feather Lakes, Colorado. Governor Cuomo also welcomed home three additional DEC Forest Rangers who assisted wildland firefighting efforts in California and Oregon.“We’ve all seen the devastation these wildfires have had on thousands of families out west who have lost everything,” Cuomo said. “I’m proud that these brave New Yorkers stepped up and traveled to the front lines to help suppress these fires before more homes and lives are lost. These brave men and women are the very definition of New York Tough.” The returning New York crew joined federal, state, and local fire agencies battling the Cameron Peak Fire in Colorado, which is about 20 percent contained. They were tasked with securing control lines. In addition, three DEC Forest Rangers assisted in fighting fires in California and Oregon. One Ranger was assigned to the Fork Fire burning in California’s El Dorado National Forest. Another Ranger helped fight flames in the Valley Fire in rural eastern San Diego County, and the third served as Task Force Leader for operations related to the Slater Fire in Oregon.All personnel and travel expenses for the New York crews are either paid directly by the U.S. Forest Service or reimbursed to New York State based on a mutual aid agreement between states and federal land agencies.last_img read more


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first_img Related Shows View Comments Cabaret Now that Cabaret headliner Sienna Miller is officially a Broadway star, she’s earned her place on the wall at legendary theater hotspot Sardi’s! Her co-stars Leeds Hill, Benjamin Eakeley, Kaleigh Cronin, Evan Siegel and Caleb Damschroder were on hand to cheer her on at the unveiling ceremony on March 27, 2015. Do you see the resemblance? Congratulations, Sienna! Check out the new portrait, then see her in Cabaret at Broadway’s Studio 54 through March 29. Show Closed This production ended its run on March 29, 2015last_img


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