Category: egfpakvz

Category: egfpakvz

first_imgAlthough mammalian mating systems are classically characterized in terms of male competition and polygyny, it is becoming increasingly apparent that alternative male strategies and female choice may play important roles. For example, females who mate with males from a dominant dynasty risk producing inbred offspring. Many pinnipeds are highly polygynous, but in some species alternative male strategies such as aquatic mating appear to be important, even when behavioral observations suggest strong polygyny. Here, we analyze male reproductive success in the Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus gazella, an otariid described behaviorally as being highly polygynous, by combining a microsatellite paternity analysis spanning seven consecutive breeding seasons with detailed behavioral data on both sexes. Territorial males fathered 59% of 660 pups analyzed from our study colony. Male reproductive skew was considerable, with a quarter of all paternities assigned to just 12 top individuals on a beach where mean annual pup production was 635. Most males were successful for only a single season, but those able to return over successive years enjoyed rapidly increasing success with each additional season of tenure. We found no evidence of alternative male reproductive tactics such as aquatic or sneaky terrestrial mating. However, paternity was strongly influenced by maternal status. Females observed on the beach without a pup were significantly less likely to conceive to a sampled territorial male than equivalent females that did pup. In addition, their pups carried combinations of paternal alleles that were less likely to be found on the study beach and exhibited lower levels of shared paternity. Thus, from a territorial male’s perspective, not all females offer equal opportunities for fertilization.last_img read more


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first_imgTatler sits somewhere between House and Gardens and Vogue. Geographically at least:its offices occupy the third floor of Condénast’s headquarters in London, sandwichedbetween the other titles in the magazine publisher’s stable. Geordie Greig, editor since1999, occupies a corner office decorated with prints of former covers. In a pink checkedshirt open at the collar he surveys his overwhelmingly female staff. The walls of the offi ceare glass but the ceiling certainly is not: for, as, Greig claims, he “employs 98% women.”The third floor location and the tough looking doormen employed by Condénast areperhaps there for a reason, Greig’s magazine being one that everyone seems to have ahold on. although younger readers have a tendency to elide the definite article that theirparents would have prefaced it with, The Tatler is nevertheless unique, particularlyfollowing the rebranding of Harpers and Queen. “We’ll be the only social magazine left inBritain. Hoorah,” quips Greig. But what exactly is a social magazine, what is the formula thathas kept Tatler going since its foundation in 1709? “It’s a luxury. Like a fabulous boxof chocolates. deeply desirable, enjoyable. decadent and sometimes a little wicked.” Flicking through the current issue reveals an interview with Paris Hilton in which the hotelheiress enlightens the reader with her preferred conversation topics with her manicurist, ashort story by the improbably named evgenia Citkowitz about a sixth former at the kind ofgirls’ school whose leavers ball photos appear in Bystander, and numerous glossy ads.advertising is clearly important: “the big brands love Tatler because it’s very english, it’s gota sense of humour, a very rich readership.” Very rich indeed: there are a mere 86,000 ofthem, but in a year they spend a total of £1.1 billion on travel alone. as a magazine Tatlerchronicles society, and Greig is insistent on having writers who “have the insidetrack;” hence a list of contributors encompassing both Parker-Bowles children and LordFreddie Windsor. But how valid is the notion of society in today’s england of labourpoliticians and Pete and Jordan’s OK nuptials? Greig is adamant that “every country has asociety.” He points out that society is, and always has been, accepting of new talent and(gasp) new money. “There’s no stigma to making money: people like success. Theestablishment is always made up of those who do well, who reach up.” as anyone whohas seen Madonna’s current tweed phase will no doubt agree, these people merge. “Whowould have thought rock stars, symbols of rebellion, would be shooting pheasants oncountry estates?” Our interview takes place during London Fashion week, and Greig uses the example of theguest list at donatella Versace’s party to illustrate this new trend: “there were peoplefrom grand houses, people from rock, people from fashion, from the financial industry.” anddo they all get on? “I think people are all rather intrigued by each other.” But neverthelessTatler is not just for insiders. “It’s read by probably the widest and most influential circleof readers it’s possible to have. From Tony Blair’s spin doctors to Saatchis, to fifteen yearolds at schools all over the country.” Certainly not all of these could be classed asmembers of capitalised London Society. Even in Oxford it is not only those who can spottheir school friends in the back pages who read the magazine. Greig agrees that there canbe an element of voyeurism involved: in peeking into a different social milieu, a differentworld. But the balance has to be kept right. “The insider should feel it’s right and that they’remore informed, and the outsider should find it interesting and fascinating, and aspire toknow more about that kind of life.” However, Greig emphasises that his magazine is nottotally serious: “Humour is very important for Tatler. I think we need to be mischievous,ironic, to sometimes bite the hand that feeds us.” It is reassuring to hear that articlessuch as ‘Terror on the King’s road: Why Chelsea is no longer safe’ (which appeared, withunfortunate irony, shortly before the July 7th underground bombings) are not conceived witha deadly serious public service agenda. But do some people miss the joke? “If they dothey probably don’t read us again,” laughs Greig. “I think most people who enjoy Tatlerenjoy the sense of having fun, including taking the piss sometimes.”But who is this man who claims to “come in every morning thrilled to be herebecause there are exciting things to be done?” now in his mid forties,he has worked injournalism since leaving university at Oxford, although he claims: “I always usedto be rather nervous about calling myself a journalist.” After Eton he read english at St.Peter’s, but was not involved with the student press. “I had a horrid time doingjournalism at Oxford. When I wrote one piece for the Isis, the editor totally rewrote it,made up quotes and I had to write a letter of apology. I thought: shit, I’m not goingto do this.” But do it he did, eschewing a job in banking to take up an offerat a newspaper in deptford. except it turned out not to be an offer: someone at the Southeast London and Kentish Mercury merely thought it would be amusing to have someonewhose CV read ‘eton, Oxford, deptford.’ They did, however, employ him as a crime reporter.Was working in one of London’s poorest boroughs a culture shock? “You have to begenuine. Normal rules of life: be yourself. People don’t give a monkey’s as long as you areyourself and you’re comfortable in your own skin.” After two years he moved to the SundayTimes, who sent him to america. Greig claims: “I loved new York. It was areal life changer.” He covered “all the fun, froth and trivia,” as well as more seriousevents like the Waco shootings. After five years he returned to London as the SundayTimes’ Literary editor, a position he held for a further five years. What about the job atTatler? “I was rung up out of the blue by Nicholas Coleridge, who is the managing directorof Condénast. He said: “Please don’t put the phone down: this is probably the maddest callyou’ve ever had, but would you consider being editor of Tatler?” He admits he had noidea it was coming at the time, but he eagerly accepted. “Tatler is one of the oldest, mostdistinguished magazines, with a pedigree going back almost three hundred years, and it’shad some great editors who made a difference in journalism.”He mentions how the magazine “punches above it’s weight: we’re a small circulation thattries to have a big impact. Tatler is an authority on social life.” Certainly the rest ofthe media listens. Greig recalls the time “we declared the dinner party was dead. Therewere headlines in Korea, Canada, people rang us up.” On another occasion there were“seven TV stations camped outside (his) offi ce” following an interview with Prince Andrew.The transition from a ‘gritty, warty newspaper’ to a glossy magazine with a two month leadin period was a challenging one. “My first three months were quite tense. I thought it wasgoing to be the same as newspapers, whereas it‘s very different.” How so? “It is lessadrenalin led. You haven’t got that intense sense of ‘we’re going off the press in thirtyminutes.’ Moreover the subject matter is different. at the start, Greig “didn’t know anythingabout fashion. [He] thought Pucci was a misspelling of Gucci.” However it was not just theswitch to magazine journalism and the more female environment that the new editor had todeal with. He also had his own agenda. “I wanted to make it more journalistic andI wanted to go back to its roots, bringing in great writers, a sense of style.” Under Greig’scommand Tatler has featured work by Tom Wolfe, Kazuo Ishiguro, VS naipaul, William Boydand Seamus Heaney. “I have tried to make it more intelligent. I think our readers can takegreat writing.” Great writing it is, and in a glamorous showcase. Tatler is the kind of placewhere the staff can borrow clothes from the heaps of couture in the fashion department ifthey need something smarter for the evening. Aspiration shows on its shiny pages, but does it shine brightly enough in today’sincreasingly homogenized world, where everyone is middle class? I ask Greig if it is stillcool to be posh. He considers for a minute and replies: “It’s never cool simply to be posh,but it’s fine to be yourself. Whether you’re posh or Polish or from Pittsburgh doesn’t reallymatter.”ARCHIVE: 4th week MT 2005last_img read more


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first_img With the capabilities of satellites developing so rapidly, new ideas for services that use their data and connections are coming thick and fast. We’ve seen that the ideas of UK’s young, tech-literate generation are just as achievable as those being developed by mature companies, addressing challenges for vulnerable people and in our own daily lives that could never have been solved before. The standard of presentations provided by the students was exceptional, even better than some companies who pitch to us. We’ve seen the future of satellite applications from these young people, and I’m excited to see what they could achieve over the coming years. Young entrepreneurs have been offered help to turn their ideas on how satellites can improve life on Earth into reality thanks to a Dragons’ Den style event organised by the UK Space Agency.The youngsters, aged 13 to 21, were offered the chance to pitch their proposals to a panel of leading space industry experts after winning the Agency’s SatelLife Challenge.The experts offered a range of support to develop the ideas including funding, patent advice and invitations to discuss job opportunities as well as introductions to the other relevant experts for further help.The winning ideas included a GPS wristband that uses satellite location data and communications services to identify the locations of swimmers and surfers in the sea and an app to map changes in urban areas using satellites and algorithms, identifying where building is taking place and potential sites for development.Emily Gravestock, Head of Applications Strategy UK Space Agency, said: The young talent that we have in the UK is second to none. I’m so pleased to see these young adults engaging with the space sector as it will be a major economy of the future. From left: Emily Gravestock, UK Space Agency, Adina Gillespie, Earth i, Adam Brocklehurst, K2 IP Limited, Nick Appleyard, European Space Agency, Stuart Martin, Satellite Applications Catapult and Karen Roche, Kx Technology.The Dragons’ Den style event was held at the Satellite Applications Catapult at Harwell Space Cluster in Oxfordshire.Adam Brocklehurst, Patent Attorney at K2 IP Limited who was one of the judges, said: Another judge, Adina Gillespie, Institutional Strategist at Earth i, added: I’m really impressed with the innovative ideas coming out of people so young. The presentations and the ideas were all fantastic and you could see they had worked really hard on them. It was great to see so many girls involved and that reflects well on work the UK Space Agency and other bodies are doing to encourage girls to study STEM subjects. Now in its second year, SatelLife Challenge supports the development of science, data handling and technological skills, complementing the Government’s Year of Engineering campaign which is championing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to the next generation.Dr Nick Appleyard, Head of Downstream Business Applications at ESA, said: The other judges on the panel were Stuart Martin, Chief Executive of Satellite Applications Catapult and Karen Roche, Business Development Director at Kx Technology.A group of school children from Cornwall and a student from Wiltshire were the overall winners of the SatelLife Challenge.Ellie Jones, Jessica Knight, both 15, Summer Jeffery and Emily Haddrell, both 14, from Truro, scooped £7,500 for the best group entry in the UK Space Agency competition with their Surf Safe concept. Ieuan Higgs, from Chippenham, received £7,500 for the best individual entry for his Infrastructure Planning and Development Analysis Tool.The competition is split into three age groups: 11 – 16; 16 – 18; 18 – 22, and a further seven entries from across the age categories were awarded £5,000.With one in four of all telecoms satellites already built substantially in Britain, the government’s Industrial Strategy includes plans to work with the industry to grow the space sector and establish commercial space launch services from the UK for the first time.Earlier this week the UK Space Agency announced a new fund of up to £4 million which is available for innovative ideas on high-tech solutions for some of the major problems facing NHS England. In the joint initiative with NHS England, innovators will bid for money to turn technology originally designed for space, from exploration to satellite communications, into medical applications that improve NHS treatment and care.last_img read more


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first_imgAndy Clegg, senior buying manager – Bread & Commodities for Morrisons, told British Baker the five things Morrisons is looking for in a bakery supplier“Quality – We’re really proud of our own-brand quality, be that in cake shop & patisserie, wrapped bread or in-store bakery, and it’s important that we have suppliers who share our passion. We always strive to source the best quality for our customers and are continually looking at ways to improve, to make that even better.“Consistency – It’s really important that we maintain our great quality day-in day-out, 365 days a year, constantly delighting our customers and delivering trust, and also giving our bakeries the confidence that the ingredients they are using will perform as expected.“Value – We understand manufacturing and the commodities that make up ingredients. We always give our customers a great price for the product that we are selling. It’s important for suppliers to understand that value is not about getting the cheapest product for the cheapest price. We will always put quality at the heart of our own-brand offering.“Newness and innovation – Don’t hide your light under a bushel! If you’ve got a great product or a great idea, let us know about it. Customers are always looking for something different and exciting. True innovation will always lead to increased sales, as long as it delivers quality and value.“Great service – It goes without saying that in order to give great service to our customers we need great service from our suppliers. When we get great service, we can focus on growing and developing the business.”last_img read more


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first_imgThe second annual Innings Festival is officially scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, March 2nd and 3rd, 2019 at the Tempe Beach Park & Arts Park in Tempe, Arizona. The two-day event, produced by C3 Presents, will be headlined by Eddie Vedder of Pearl Jam and Incubus. There will also be performances from Sheryl Crow, Jimmy Eat World, Cake, Band of Horses, Grouplove, St. Paul & The Broken Bones, Blues Traveler, Shakey Graves and more.This is an event for music lovers and passionate baseball fans alike, as Innings Festival will feature performances by 18 artists on two stages as well as curated food vendors, fun family activities, and appearances by MLB greats including Roger Clemens, Jake Peavy, Sean Casey, Huston Street, Eric Byrnes and more in Arizona’s Cactus League Spring Training.1-Day & 2-Day General Admission, VIP and Platinum Tickets will go on sale today at 12pm PST at here.last_img read more


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first_imgThe Obama administration seeks a “path to a better way” for the nations of southeastern Europe, and a top administration official laid out the components of that strategy during a talk on Wednesday (Feb. 17) sponsored by Harvard Kennedy School’s Kokkalis Program on Southeastern and East-Central Europe.Phillip H. Gordon, U.S. assistant secretary for the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, told an audience in the Goodman Classroom that “the political and economic integration” of southeastern Europe within the rest of the continent is the key to regional stabilization and development in the years ahead.“We have a vision of a peaceful and stable Europe that will extend to Turkey and the Caucasus,” he said. “The solution lies in transnational cooperation and institutions that guarantee the rights of citizens, promote economic freedom, insure the viability of the border, and provide a reliable forum for the peaceful resolution of disputes.”Gordon pointed to the critical importance of regional and international institutions in this effort, specifically NATO and the European Union. Several southeastern European countries are now members of the EU, including Bulgaria, Greece, and Romania, and several belong to NATO, including Albania, Croatia, and Turkey. Other nations are seeking entry into one or both organizations.“The opportunity for political engagement that crosses national borders reduces the salience and pressure of ethnic and regional disputes within countries. That is the promise of the project of European integration,” Gordon said.Recent decades have brought tremendous change to the region, Gordon added, and the United States is now developing close and productive relations with several nations in the area, including Serbia, which was beset by violence and instability as recently as a decade ago.“I certainly believe … that with pragmatism and goodwill on both sides, U.S.-Serbian relations could be a model of a productive partnership by the end of the administration’s first term,” Gordon said. “This change in the Balkans is a reminder not only of what can be possible, but also what remains to be done” elsewhere.Kosovo is another example of a “remarkable story of progress” in the Balkans, Gordon said, although he admitted the country faces serious challenges that will require a “great deal of work” moving forward.Gordon also pointed to the critical roles that Greece and Turkey will play in helping stabilize southeastern Europe, arguing that “regional political leadership and courage and vision is necessary for progress.”In his concluding remarks, Gordon cited the fact that “some of the same fault lines” that have plagued the region for many years still remain, but that he is hopeful there is a “clear potential solution” in the full economic and political integration of the southeastern states within greater Europe.Gordon was introduced at the podium by Elaine Papoulias, director of the Kokkalis Program. About 100 people attended the lecture.last_img read more


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first_img PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Listen: Polyrhythms “To see a Muñequitos show is priceless,” said Terry, who grew up seeing the 65-year-old group perform. “The work that they’re doing is very important for the younger generation because it continues the oral tradition of passing information from the older generation to the younger. It’s the first time my students are experiencing a real rumba, expressed with authenticity. I can teach this in classes, but it’s different to see. It inspires my band to look back into their own culture and use that inspiration to move things forward.”That kind of personal connection struck John Miller, a junior studying statistics, when he stepped off the tour bus the next day in Güines. The saxophone player, who grew up in Westlake, Calif., noticed among the crumbling buildings and stray animals in the town square children playing in a bright pink bouncy house and riding plastic toy cars.“That scene is very familiar to me. It looks exactly like the parks near my grandparents’ house. My mom’s family is Mexican, and they live in Chino, a very Mexican part of California. Everyone gathers in the parks for celebrations and get-togethers,” he said.,* * *In deciding to visit Güines, Terry said he wanted his students to see how a poor town used its musical roots to keep local children “out of trouble and get them into the community.”“Tata Güines was an incredible force to reckon with, venerated around the world. This isn’t a modern museum, or a beautiful part of Cuba,” he said. “But here is where they’re using art to empower the kids.” Visiting the museum where percussionist and composer Güines grew up, band members listened to the Cuban tour guide recount his modest roots. The son of a laundress, he banged out his first beats on the bottom of his mother’s wash bin. “They were very humble people,” she said, before leading the Harvard band into the courtyard for a performance. “The king of the drums was born.”As local drummers hit the sacred bata drums, dancers colorfully dressed to represent their deities and orishas — minor gods — circled the courtyard. After the performance, several students were invited to learn the rhythmic patterns. “Having the village elder come up and introduce it and demonstrate it, that was the definition of an educational moment.” — Jared Perlo Listen: Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde Music scholarship framed each day’s activities; the band members passed traditional Havana tourist sites such as Revolution Square and the Capitol Building with only a glance. Instead, Terry took students such as 19-year-old Jared Perlo, who plays trombone, to hear performances from the likes of Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde in Matanzas, the birthplaces of the music and dance traditions rumba and danzón, respectively. “This was really a week of learning in an environment where these musical traditions were actually born,” said Perlo, the band’s tour manager, who organized the trip along with Terry. “Being able to learn in places with the masters is an experience that I don’t think anything else I will ever do in the jazz scene will ever compare to.”The tour began in Matanzas, a fishing town on the northern shore that is home to some of the country’s biggest musical groups. On the way, the young musicians visited Castillo de San Severino, a military fortress built in 1735 and rebuilt years later as an entry point for slaves. Inside is the National Museum of the Slave Route, where students viewed the displays of African drums (Yuka, Bembé, Arará, Makuta) and mannequins representing various gods (Ogun, the Yoruba god of war and ironworkers; Ochossi, god of hunters and justice).“It’s important to come here and see how these traditions have survived, and have been kept, and the different ways they have evolved and mixed with other cultures,” said Terry.,* * *At the newly restored José White Concert Hall, the jazz band sat up front for a performance by Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde. Named for the bandleader who originated danzón in 1879, the dance combines European and African rhythms with elegant footwork. Failde’s great-great-grandson Ethiel, a flutist, led his band of musicians, ages 18 to 37, while an elderly couple — impeccably dressed, the woman holding a fan — strolled across the stage and began to move.Orquesta Típica performed several dynamic pieces, including the popular “Almendra” and “Daulema,” which was composed by Terry and trumpeter Jesús Alemañy. Then Failde invited the students to join the musicians on stage. Junior Brian Rolincik, who plays trombone, was among the first to join the “adrenaline-filled moment.” “Music is such a universal language, both in terms of the notation and the feelings you get from it, and in the camaraderie it creates among people of diverse cultures.” — Brian Rolincik PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen In a music classroom, conservatory students played for the band, and listened as Harvard students took their turn playing at the front of the classroom. With Terry and Yero translating, the Cuban teens asked how Harvard students played so well even though most of them concentrate in other disciplines.“Here your life revolves around your music,” said Yero, explaining that Cuban children begin their singular path to musicianship at ages 7 or 8.Reflecting on the La Ena exchange, baritone saxophonist Diana Gerberich, who grew up in Wilbraham, Mass., and had never been abroad before, was fascinated by the difference between how the two cultures “learn and interpret their music.”“The Cuban music tradition uses  polyrhythms, which American musicians are less familiar with. Several of the Cuban musicians we worked with tried to teach us polyrhythms, and it was very difficult at first. The Cuban musicians seem so comfortable with it, though. It’s interesting to reflect on what we understand versus what other people understand,” she said. * * *,After a week of engaging with students and performers, the jazz band took the stage at Casa de las Americas for a community concert. The Jam Session concert featured many of Terry’s friends, illustrious Cuban musicians including composer Bobby Carcassés, chekeré player (and Terry’s father) Don Pancho Terry, trumpeter Julito Padrón, and bass player Gastón Joya. Wearing light-blue guayaberas, the band performed a range of pieces to a full house for nearly two hours, including George Cables’ “Dark Side, Light Side” and “Moten Swing,” Cuban composer Joaquín Betancourt’s “Manteca,” and Carcassés’ piece “Blues Guaguancó.” “It was cool to be so welcomed and to just feel deeply entrenched in this Cuban tradition of danzón. Music is such a universal language, both in terms of the notation and the feelings you get from it, and in the camaraderie it creates among people of diverse cultures,” said the 21-year-old, who is studying linguistics. “To start to not only learn on an intellectual level the difference between our and Cuban culture, but to feel in the daily routines here what human experience comes down to — how you interact, how you speak — all of those habits comprise the culture. To try to feel those and to try and emulate those is a lot I can take away.”,There was more to absorb at an afternoon performance by Los Muñequitos de Matanzas. Trading the wood-paneled concert hall for a modest, second-story room with a tin roof, the students sat on the red-painted cement floor to watch the legendary rumba group. Dancers honoring traditions brought to Cuba by African slaves spun around the room in red, blue, and gold costumes while multiple percussionists drummed.“What’s so impressive is that the Cubans have internalized rhythms typical of Afro-Cuban jazz that don’t come as easily to us. Conversely, American students tend to feel comfortable in swing time. It’s striking to me that it’s [Yoruba] music that predates everything we study,” said guitarist Evan Vietorisz, whose Cuban grandmother immigrated to the United States in 1946. “She never shared anything with our family about her heritage because she sought to assimilate. It’s cool to be visiting Cuba and experiencing the culture that … hasn’t been part of my upbringing.” “It’s the first time my students are experiencing a real rumba, expressed with authenticity. I can teach this in classes, but it’s different to see.” — Yosvany Terry Listen: Clave HAVANA — It isn’t easy to get to Güines. Though the town once contained Cuba’s leading sugar plantation slave enclave and its earliest railway, Güines (pronounced Gwin-es) isn’t listed on TripAdvisor or in any major travel guide. When the Harvard Jazz Bands traveled there recently as part of a musical tour of the island, security wouldn’t let their bus cross the small bridge into town, forcing it to find another route.Once inside the town, though, the lessons from its rich musical past — and the visions of its hopes for the future — crystallized in a tiny courtyard covered in torn colored fabrics symbolizing the Cuban flag. The band members, under the guidance of Director Yosvany Terry, a native of Cuba, toured the historic one-room museum home of Tata Güines, one of the country’s top percussionists, and watched an Afro-Cuban performance of percussion, dance, and chanting by the National Folkloric Company of Cuba.,Listen: National Folkloric Company of Cuba PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreencenter_img PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Appreciating Cuban music, its vast diversity, and how deeply it is sewn into the social and political fabric of the country was at the heart of the Harvard band’s trip. The fast-paced, eight-day musical adventure in early June marked the group’s first tour in 25 years, and Terry, a saxophonist and chekeré player who joined the faculty in 2015, organized an itinerary not only to showcase Cuba’s musical vibrancy, but also to illuminate recent efforts to rescue and preserve age-old traditions.“This is the stuff that makes me tick. Coming from a percussion background, I’ve learned so much from watching them,” said Ethan Kripke, a sophomore who plays drums. “How they learn and internalize rhythm is just fundamentally different than in the United States. The clave is a fundamental rhythmic pulse that everything else — the percussion, the singing, the dancing — relates back to. It’s very precise but, if performed correctly, it gives the music a certain elasticity.” “The clave is a fundamental rhythmic pulse that everything else — the percussion, the singing, the dancing — relates back to.” — Ethan Kripke “Having the village elder come up and introduce it and demonstrate it, that was the definition of an educational moment,” said Perlo.Perlo’s drive to make the trip happen was prompted, in part, by his father’s experience. Don Perlo ’83 played in the Harvard band during his time at the College, and toured with the group in the Dominican Republic 26 years ago.“Ever since meeting Yosvany, I knew there was something special he brought to rehearsals and campus. We’d hang around after rehearsal, and he’d talk about how he was influenced by his upbringing in Cuba. Knowing his creative spirit and willingness to try new things, well, here we are,” said Perlo. Home base during the tour was a hostel called Casa Vera in the Vedado neighborhood of Havana. The band was composed of 13 undergraduates and three other musicians, including newly graduated Sara Politz, who will teach ethnomusicology this fall at Williams College; Cuban trumpeter Yaure Muniz; and alumnus (and professional trumpeter) Bob Merrill. The week would culminate with an official concert by the band at Casa de las Américas in Havana, preceded by visits to several conservatories to work with local music students.,* * *On the bus rides to the schools, the Harvard students heard about Cuba’s history from tour guide Manny Calvo, who explained the importance of poet José Martí, a national hero, and passed around his own ration book, listing the quantities and types of food his family was eligible to receive every month. Cary Garcia Yero, a Ph.D. student at Harvard studying Cuba’s history, added context to the conversation about Fidel Castro’s revolution and the nation’s racial dynamics, and shared a Harvard connection: During a U.S. occupation of the island in 1900, 1,300 Cuban teachers trained in Cambridge before returning home.“Seeing a country like Cuba is fascinating because my mom is from the former Soviet Union,” which was a communist state as Cuba is, said Jake Tilton, a junior tenor saxophonist who is concentrating in music and government. “Cuba is sort of a time capsule into the age that my mother lived in. It’s interesting to see the system she lived under, and how those political and social systems work.”,Music was never far from the conversation, and even small moments on the bus felt momentous for the students. On one ride, Terry queued up Herbie Hancock’s “Watermelon Man,” asking: “Everybody got a flute?” The band members hummed and tapped imaginary instruments in unison to the music coming from the speaker.“That might have been the coolest five minutes I’ve spent on a bus,” said saxophonist Richard M. Feder, a junior from Long Island studying astrophysics.Terry’s hopes for the trip were twofold: to expose the students to “one of the most sophisticated cultural bastions of the Americas” and to break the barrier between professor and student in a more experiential setting.“I wanted them to experience the intellect and visual culture from the eyes of a Cuban citizen,” he said. “And it was intentional to take them out of what would be the obvious tourist instinct.”,* * *Nowhere was the challenge to conventional American musical sensibilities felt more acutely than in visits to three conservatories: Guillermo Tomás, Amadeo Roldán, and the National Schools for the Arts (La Ena). At each, the Harvard band donated a musical instrument and music stands as part of the Horns to Havana program. At Amadeo Roldán in Centro Havana, piano student Rodrigo Garcia led his band in a performance, then listened to the Harvard group perform.“Many Cubans have looked for the way to get into the world of American music that, to us, is also a very rich culture worth studying,” Garcia said. “All exchanges that we have with American musicians are a gift for us. And they are also a way for us to communicate, a way to unite cultures, a way to create a bridge between these two countries that are so close but that have been separated for so long for reasons that are not valid to us.”It was at La Ena, where Terry studied in 1990, that the jazz band spent an afternoon workshopping with two bands. Conceived on a former country club golf course by Castro in 1961, the campus is made up of Catalan-vaulted buildings, which house schools of dance, dramatic arts, music, and plastic arts. On a walk around the sprawling campus, the band watched dancers rehearse, then visited a waterlogged ballet performance space. Built but never used after Alicia Alonso, one of Cuba’s prima ballerinas, refused to dance there, the terra cotta building sits in disrepair, with the only sound coming from bats flying inside the domed roof.,“The Cuban music tradition uses  polyrhythms, which American musicians are less familiar with. Several of the Cuban musicians we worked with tried to teach us polyrhythms, and it was very difficult at first.” — Diana Gerberich Instructor Yosvany Terry returns home, where his musical destiny was formed Listen: Bata drums Related Kripke, the drummer, played alongside acclaimed percussionist Yaroldy Abreu, and was still star-struck afterward. “This past week I was constantly exposed to new rhythmic ideas, and different interpretations of the ones I knew. I was expecting this to be the case because of Cuba’s rich West African musical tradition. In the culminating concert, I tried to put all of my new knowledge to use. I incorporated ideas into my playing tonight that only a week ago I wouldn’t have considered. And Yaroldy looking over to me while letting out a joyous scream after I played some particularly Cuban-inspired fill was enough to know that I had succeeded.” After the concert, the band shared a late-night dinner with the luminaries, and Perlo declaring the week “mind-blowing.”“This will be my favorite memory of Harvard. On a music and jazz level, I’ve learned more in seven days than in a couple of years in a classroom,” he said.“I haven’t done many things in my life that have ended in an incredibly beautiful experience shared by 20 other people who will remember it for decades to come. It sounds like an overstatement, but I don’t think it will be.”Next week: A profile on music professor, jazz band director, and Cuban native Yosvany Terry and his journey home. Harvard jazz leader, amid his Cuban roots PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Listen: Los Muñequitos de Matanzaslast_img read more


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first_imgAs the child of two parents with doctorates in economics, Isaiah Andrews went to college intent on not studying the same field.But the work engaged him deeply, particularly the way it could help answer important public-policy questions, so Andrews not only majored in economics and math, but went on to receive his Ph.D. in economics as well. And today he was named a 2020 MacArthur Fellow by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for his dynamic work in the subfield of econometrics.“A highly productive researcher and generous collaborator, Andrews demonstrates keen insight into how to address key statistical challenges in econometrics that are directly useful to empirical economists and have relevance to multiple fields,” reads his MacArthur Fellow profile.“Thinking about the returns to education, the long-term contributors to economic growth, what drives business cycles — these are super-important questions for the short- and long-term welfare of society,” said the 34-year-old, who joined the Economics Department faculty in 2018 after a two-year stint as a postdoc in the Harvard Society of Fellows. “There are folks giving the best answers they can to those questions, and my subfield works on developing new statistical methods and evaluating the reliability of existing methods in order to help with that. We have to develop the best tools we can.”This year there were 21 winners of the so-called “genius awards.” MacArthur Fellows receive a sum of $625,000 each to use any way they choose. Andrews said he has not had time to consider what projects or areas of research he might focus on. Until today’s announcement, he was only allowed to share the news with one person: his husband, Welton Blount.“It still feels unreal when I think about it,” he said, adding that he had no idea when he was nominated.Andrews grew up in Brookline, Mass., graduated with a double major from Yale in 2009, and completed his doctorate at MIT in 2014. After his time in the Harvard Society of Fellows, he taught at MIT from 2016 to 2018, when he joined Harvard’s economics faculty.“I’ve had a great experience in the department, first as a postdoc, when the department was kind enough to give me an office and include me in department events, and, more recently, as a faculty member,” he said. “It’s a privilege to have such outstanding and dedicated colleagues, and to have the opportunity to work with such fantastic students.”Much of Andrews’ research studies statistical inference, with a particular focus on methods that remain reliable when commonly used techniques fail.“A lot of my work looks at how things can go wrong,” he said. “I’ve focused on how to more reliably quantify uncertainty. I think uncertainty is real in the world, and it’s important that we measure it as well as we can.”“Isaiah is doing cutting-edge work that is increasing the sophistication and precision of analysis in the field,” said FAS Dean of Social Science Lawrence D. Bobo. “His work on matters of basic research design, fine-grained quantitative approaches, appropriate scope of inference, and the most rigorous statistical tests put him in a very special category.”Much of his work deals with a problem known as weak identification, which arises when data contain relatively little information, an issue that can lead to misleading results when using popular methods to test hypotheses and quantify uncertainty. In a series of papers, many co-authored with Anna Mikusheva, his Ph.D. dissertation supervisor, Andrews developed more reliable methods for weakly identified settings.More recently, in a paper published last year with Maximilian Kasy in the American Economic Review, Andrews proposed a method to correct for publication bias and construct unbiased estimates.“Some statistical results are much more likely to be written up in papers and published. So for example, imagine that there are 100 groups studying job training around the world. Imagine that five of them conclude the program works, while the rest conclude that it doesn’t do much. If we only publish the findings from the groups which say job training is effective, this leads to a very distorted picture of job training effectiveness,” he said.That work helped inform research from Nathaniel Hendren and Ben Sprung-Keyser, published this year in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, that examined the return for many social programs.“One of the headline findings was that many of these programs targeting low-income children more than paid for themselves. But there was concern about publication bias, that research showing these programs don’t do anything might not get published at all. By applying the method from our paper, they were able to correct for this concern. In fact, there did appear to be some publication bias, but even once they corrected for that, the finding of substantial benefit survives.”Andrews, who is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2017, and earlier this year an NSF grant with Jesse Shapiro and in collaboration with Matthew Gentzkow. He serves as an associate editor of the American Economic Review, Econometrica, the Journal of Econometrics, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. He won MIT’s Robert M. Solow Prize for Excellence in Research and Teaching in 2014, and the Excellence Award from the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale in 2009. Beginning next year, he will serve on the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economics Profession.last_img read more


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first_img Impeccable character. Provided outstanding leadership affecting Georgia agriculture. Made noteworthy contributions. Received recognition for achievements in appropriate ways. Great accomplishments in more than one area. For a nominationform or further information, call the Officeof Development and Alumni Relations at (706) 542-3390.The postmark deadline for nominations is March 15. The Hall of Fame induction ceremonywill be during the AAA’s annual awards banquet Sept. 22. The Agricultural Alumni Association of the University of Georgia College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences is seeking nominations for the 2000 GeorgiaAgricultural Hall of Fame.The Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame program is designed to recognize those who havemade significant achievements in agriculture, agribusiness industries and the serviceinstitutions.Honorees should have:last_img read more


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first_imgFeb. 4 at the Asa M. Powell Expo Center in Newnan, Ga.Feb. 11 at First Methodist Church in Morrow, Ga.Feb. 18 at the Chattahoochee Nature Center in Roswell, Ga. University of GeorgiaYou’ll have to learn about the birds elsewhere, but threeupcoming workshops will teach you all about the bees.Atlanta-area beekeeper associations are offering a series ofone-day courses, “An Introduction to Honeybees and Beekeeping.”Attendees will learn the basics about honeybees, plantpollination, Africanized honeybees and beekeeping.The course will be especially valuable to students, teachers,Master Gardeners, beginning and hobbyist beekeepers and anyoneinterested in learning new things.When, whereThe program will begin at 8:30 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. on aSaturday. The same program will be at three sites: The $45 fee is the same in advance or at the door. It coversmorning coffee, lunch, educational materials and instruction bythe University of Georgia entomology faculty and masterbeekeepers.You can learn more and get a preregistration form online atwww.beekeepingshortcourse.com. Or contact either Martha Kiefer(770-668-0981 or [email protected]), P.N. Williams (404-366-6404or [email protected]ol.com) or Wally Batchlor (770-251-0479 [email protected]).last_img read more


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