Giving mum a break this Christmas?

Tag: 419爱上海

first_imgNewsGiving mum a break this Christmas?By admin – December 16, 2010 435 WhatsApp Linkedin Twitter Advertisement Facebookcenter_img Previous article10% cut proposed in city budgetNext articlePrepaid debit cards for everyone admin Email Print GIVE Mum the day off this Christmas Day and let Cornstore at Home prepare your favourite dinner of the year. Save hours of preparation time with a Cornstore at Home ‘Christmas Day Parcel’ that contains everything you need for the perfect, traditional Christmas dinner… just add the turkey and ham.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The ‘Cornstore at Home’ gourmet deli opened last weekend at No.41 Thomas Street (at the former Country Basket premises). It specialises in quality fare and takeaway food featuring locally sourced, natural produce specially selected by the chefs of the Cornstore restaurant, ensuring quality foods fresh from the farm direct to your fork.All year round – diners can now take home the locally sourced produce of the Cornstore restaurant, prepped by their award-winning chefs, and ready to pop in the oven.In the Christmas Day Parcel for starters, there’s smoked salmon, prawns, avocado, Marie Rose sauce, cos lettuce, and lemon wedges. Moving onto the main course, enjoy the special Cornstore recipe basting for the turkey, with stuffing, brussel sprouts, carrot and parsnip puree, jus, cranberry sauce, roast potatoes roasted in duck fat, and creamy mash.For dessert, indulge with sherry trifle, Christmas pudding, brandy butter and pouring cream. Imagine getting all of these items with none of the hours of preparation time – use the time instead for spending quality time with family and friends.Cornstore at Home also features Christmas Hampers and a range of traditional festive goodies. Christmas Day Parcels are available for different size dinner groups – advance orders essential. Call to Thomas Street for more.last_img read more


Tag: 419爱上海

first_imgPrint WhatsApp Facebook Linkedin Previous articlePhotos: After Dark at the opening night of the Limerick Literary FestivalNext articleSilent movie gives voice to domestic abuse survivors Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Twittercenter_img Designed by BedneyimagesThe death has taken place of Professor Noel Mulcahy in St Vincent’s private Hospital today (Thursday 28th February).Professor Mulcahy was Emeritus Professor of Industrial Strategy at the University of Limerick where he also served as Executive Vice President.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He was nominated to the Seanad by Jack Lynch in 1977 where he served until 1981. Throughout his long and distinguished career, he was a prolific analyst and contributor to the debate on national strategy and advised former Education Minister Donagh O’Malley on the introduction of free second level education. He also advised Governments in the 1970s and 1980s.He is survived by his wife Caroline, his children Daragh, Colm, Aisling, Garech and eleven grandchildren. Advertisement Email NewsThe death has taken place of Professor Noel MulcahyBy Staff Reporter – February 28, 2019 1329 last_img read more


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first_img Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Pinterest Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Derry’s Debenhams store to close WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Twitter Facebook Google+center_img Twitter Previous articleNew vehicle registrations down 10% in DonegalNext articleCalls for County Development Plan to be varied to deal with wind farms News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Homepage BannerNews By News Highland – December 1, 2020 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic The Debenhams store in Derry’s Foyleside is set to close after efforts to rescue the troubled company fell with the collapse of the Arcadia group, which works closely with Debenhams and has small franchise units within the stores.Earlier this year Debenhams closed its stores in the republic, now, they say 12,000 employees are likely to lose their jobs when the chain’s 124 shops across Britain and Northern Ireland cease trading. Google+ Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens furtherlast_img read more


Tag: 419爱上海

first_img PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Listen: Polyrhythms “To see a Muñequitos show is priceless,” said Terry, who grew up seeing the 65-year-old group perform. “The work that they’re doing is very important for the younger generation because it continues the oral tradition of passing information from the older generation to the younger. It’s the first time my students are experiencing a real rumba, expressed with authenticity. I can teach this in classes, but it’s different to see. It inspires my band to look back into their own culture and use that inspiration to move things forward.”That kind of personal connection struck John Miller, a junior studying statistics, when he stepped off the tour bus the next day in Güines. The saxophone player, who grew up in Westlake, Calif., noticed among the crumbling buildings and stray animals in the town square children playing in a bright pink bouncy house and riding plastic toy cars.“That scene is very familiar to me. It looks exactly like the parks near my grandparents’ house. My mom’s family is Mexican, and they live in Chino, a very Mexican part of California. Everyone gathers in the parks for celebrations and get-togethers,” he said.,* * *In deciding to visit Güines, Terry said he wanted his students to see how a poor town used its musical roots to keep local children “out of trouble and get them into the community.”“Tata Güines was an incredible force to reckon with, venerated around the world. This isn’t a modern museum, or a beautiful part of Cuba,” he said. “But here is where they’re using art to empower the kids.” Visiting the museum where percussionist and composer Güines grew up, band members listened to the Cuban tour guide recount his modest roots. The son of a laundress, he banged out his first beats on the bottom of his mother’s wash bin. “They were very humble people,” she said, before leading the Harvard band into the courtyard for a performance. “The king of the drums was born.”As local drummers hit the sacred bata drums, dancers colorfully dressed to represent their deities and orishas — minor gods — circled the courtyard. After the performance, several students were invited to learn the rhythmic patterns. “Having the village elder come up and introduce it and demonstrate it, that was the definition of an educational moment.” — Jared Perlo Listen: Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde Music scholarship framed each day’s activities; the band members passed traditional Havana tourist sites such as Revolution Square and the Capitol Building with only a glance. Instead, Terry took students such as 19-year-old Jared Perlo, who plays trombone, to hear performances from the likes of Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde in Matanzas, the birthplaces of the music and dance traditions rumba and danzón, respectively. “This was really a week of learning in an environment where these musical traditions were actually born,” said Perlo, the band’s tour manager, who organized the trip along with Terry. “Being able to learn in places with the masters is an experience that I don’t think anything else I will ever do in the jazz scene will ever compare to.”The tour began in Matanzas, a fishing town on the northern shore that is home to some of the country’s biggest musical groups. On the way, the young musicians visited Castillo de San Severino, a military fortress built in 1735 and rebuilt years later as an entry point for slaves. Inside is the National Museum of the Slave Route, where students viewed the displays of African drums (Yuka, Bembé, Arará, Makuta) and mannequins representing various gods (Ogun, the Yoruba god of war and ironworkers; Ochossi, god of hunters and justice).“It’s important to come here and see how these traditions have survived, and have been kept, and the different ways they have evolved and mixed with other cultures,” said Terry.,* * *At the newly restored José White Concert Hall, the jazz band sat up front for a performance by Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde. Named for the bandleader who originated danzón in 1879, the dance combines European and African rhythms with elegant footwork. Failde’s great-great-grandson Ethiel, a flutist, led his band of musicians, ages 18 to 37, while an elderly couple — impeccably dressed, the woman holding a fan — strolled across the stage and began to move.Orquesta Típica performed several dynamic pieces, including the popular “Almendra” and “Daulema,” which was composed by Terry and trumpeter Jesús Alemañy. Then Failde invited the students to join the musicians on stage. Junior Brian Rolincik, who plays trombone, was among the first to join the “adrenaline-filled moment.” “Music is such a universal language, both in terms of the notation and the feelings you get from it, and in the camaraderie it creates among people of diverse cultures.” — Brian Rolincik PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen In a music classroom, conservatory students played for the band, and listened as Harvard students took their turn playing at the front of the classroom. With Terry and Yero translating, the Cuban teens asked how Harvard students played so well even though most of them concentrate in other disciplines.“Here your life revolves around your music,” said Yero, explaining that Cuban children begin their singular path to musicianship at ages 7 or 8.Reflecting on the La Ena exchange, baritone saxophonist Diana Gerberich, who grew up in Wilbraham, Mass., and had never been abroad before, was fascinated by the difference between how the two cultures “learn and interpret their music.”“The Cuban music tradition uses  polyrhythms, which American musicians are less familiar with. Several of the Cuban musicians we worked with tried to teach us polyrhythms, and it was very difficult at first. The Cuban musicians seem so comfortable with it, though. It’s interesting to reflect on what we understand versus what other people understand,” she said. * * *,After a week of engaging with students and performers, the jazz band took the stage at Casa de las Americas for a community concert. The Jam Session concert featured many of Terry’s friends, illustrious Cuban musicians including composer Bobby Carcassés, chekeré player (and Terry’s father) Don Pancho Terry, trumpeter Julito Padrón, and bass player Gastón Joya. Wearing light-blue guayaberas, the band performed a range of pieces to a full house for nearly two hours, including George Cables’ “Dark Side, Light Side” and “Moten Swing,” Cuban composer Joaquín Betancourt’s “Manteca,” and Carcassés’ piece “Blues Guaguancó.” “It was cool to be so welcomed and to just feel deeply entrenched in this Cuban tradition of danzón. Music is such a universal language, both in terms of the notation and the feelings you get from it, and in the camaraderie it creates among people of diverse cultures,” said the 21-year-old, who is studying linguistics. “To start to not only learn on an intellectual level the difference between our and Cuban culture, but to feel in the daily routines here what human experience comes down to — how you interact, how you speak — all of those habits comprise the culture. To try to feel those and to try and emulate those is a lot I can take away.”,There was more to absorb at an afternoon performance by Los Muñequitos de Matanzas. Trading the wood-paneled concert hall for a modest, second-story room with a tin roof, the students sat on the red-painted cement floor to watch the legendary rumba group. Dancers honoring traditions brought to Cuba by African slaves spun around the room in red, blue, and gold costumes while multiple percussionists drummed.“What’s so impressive is that the Cubans have internalized rhythms typical of Afro-Cuban jazz that don’t come as easily to us. Conversely, American students tend to feel comfortable in swing time. It’s striking to me that it’s [Yoruba] music that predates everything we study,” said guitarist Evan Vietorisz, whose Cuban grandmother immigrated to the United States in 1946. “She never shared anything with our family about her heritage because she sought to assimilate. It’s cool to be visiting Cuba and experiencing the culture that … hasn’t been part of my upbringing.” “It’s the first time my students are experiencing a real rumba, expressed with authenticity. I can teach this in classes, but it’s different to see.” — Yosvany Terry Listen: Clave HAVANA — It isn’t easy to get to Güines. Though the town once contained Cuba’s leading sugar plantation slave enclave and its earliest railway, Güines (pronounced Gwin-es) isn’t listed on TripAdvisor or in any major travel guide. When the Harvard Jazz Bands traveled there recently as part of a musical tour of the island, security wouldn’t let their bus cross the small bridge into town, forcing it to find another route.Once inside the town, though, the lessons from its rich musical past — and the visions of its hopes for the future — crystallized in a tiny courtyard covered in torn colored fabrics symbolizing the Cuban flag. The band members, under the guidance of Director Yosvany Terry, a native of Cuba, toured the historic one-room museum home of Tata Güines, one of the country’s top percussionists, and watched an Afro-Cuban performance of percussion, dance, and chanting by the National Folkloric Company of Cuba.,Listen: National Folkloric Company of Cuba PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreencenter_img PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Appreciating Cuban music, its vast diversity, and how deeply it is sewn into the social and political fabric of the country was at the heart of the Harvard band’s trip. The fast-paced, eight-day musical adventure in early June marked the group’s first tour in 25 years, and Terry, a saxophonist and chekeré player who joined the faculty in 2015, organized an itinerary not only to showcase Cuba’s musical vibrancy, but also to illuminate recent efforts to rescue and preserve age-old traditions.“This is the stuff that makes me tick. Coming from a percussion background, I’ve learned so much from watching them,” said Ethan Kripke, a sophomore who plays drums. “How they learn and internalize rhythm is just fundamentally different than in the United States. The clave is a fundamental rhythmic pulse that everything else — the percussion, the singing, the dancing — relates back to. It’s very precise but, if performed correctly, it gives the music a certain elasticity.” “The clave is a fundamental rhythmic pulse that everything else — the percussion, the singing, the dancing — relates back to.” — Ethan Kripke “Having the village elder come up and introduce it and demonstrate it, that was the definition of an educational moment,” said Perlo.Perlo’s drive to make the trip happen was prompted, in part, by his father’s experience. Don Perlo ’83 played in the Harvard band during his time at the College, and toured with the group in the Dominican Republic 26 years ago.“Ever since meeting Yosvany, I knew there was something special he brought to rehearsals and campus. We’d hang around after rehearsal, and he’d talk about how he was influenced by his upbringing in Cuba. Knowing his creative spirit and willingness to try new things, well, here we are,” said Perlo. Home base during the tour was a hostel called Casa Vera in the Vedado neighborhood of Havana. The band was composed of 13 undergraduates and three other musicians, including newly graduated Sara Politz, who will teach ethnomusicology this fall at Williams College; Cuban trumpeter Yaure Muniz; and alumnus (and professional trumpeter) Bob Merrill. The week would culminate with an official concert by the band at Casa de las Américas in Havana, preceded by visits to several conservatories to work with local music students.,* * *On the bus rides to the schools, the Harvard students heard about Cuba’s history from tour guide Manny Calvo, who explained the importance of poet José Martí, a national hero, and passed around his own ration book, listing the quantities and types of food his family was eligible to receive every month. Cary Garcia Yero, a Ph.D. student at Harvard studying Cuba’s history, added context to the conversation about Fidel Castro’s revolution and the nation’s racial dynamics, and shared a Harvard connection: During a U.S. occupation of the island in 1900, 1,300 Cuban teachers trained in Cambridge before returning home.“Seeing a country like Cuba is fascinating because my mom is from the former Soviet Union,” which was a communist state as Cuba is, said Jake Tilton, a junior tenor saxophonist who is concentrating in music and government. “Cuba is sort of a time capsule into the age that my mother lived in. It’s interesting to see the system she lived under, and how those political and social systems work.”,Music was never far from the conversation, and even small moments on the bus felt momentous for the students. On one ride, Terry queued up Herbie Hancock’s “Watermelon Man,” asking: “Everybody got a flute?” The band members hummed and tapped imaginary instruments in unison to the music coming from the speaker.“That might have been the coolest five minutes I’ve spent on a bus,” said saxophonist Richard M. Feder, a junior from Long Island studying astrophysics.Terry’s hopes for the trip were twofold: to expose the students to “one of the most sophisticated cultural bastions of the Americas” and to break the barrier between professor and student in a more experiential setting.“I wanted them to experience the intellect and visual culture from the eyes of a Cuban citizen,” he said. “And it was intentional to take them out of what would be the obvious tourist instinct.”,* * *Nowhere was the challenge to conventional American musical sensibilities felt more acutely than in visits to three conservatories: Guillermo Tomás, Amadeo Roldán, and the National Schools for the Arts (La Ena). At each, the Harvard band donated a musical instrument and music stands as part of the Horns to Havana program. At Amadeo Roldán in Centro Havana, piano student Rodrigo Garcia led his band in a performance, then listened to the Harvard group perform.“Many Cubans have looked for the way to get into the world of American music that, to us, is also a very rich culture worth studying,” Garcia said. “All exchanges that we have with American musicians are a gift for us. And they are also a way for us to communicate, a way to unite cultures, a way to create a bridge between these two countries that are so close but that have been separated for so long for reasons that are not valid to us.”It was at La Ena, where Terry studied in 1990, that the jazz band spent an afternoon workshopping with two bands. Conceived on a former country club golf course by Castro in 1961, the campus is made up of Catalan-vaulted buildings, which house schools of dance, dramatic arts, music, and plastic arts. On a walk around the sprawling campus, the band watched dancers rehearse, then visited a waterlogged ballet performance space. Built but never used after Alicia Alonso, one of Cuba’s prima ballerinas, refused to dance there, the terra cotta building sits in disrepair, with the only sound coming from bats flying inside the domed roof.,“The Cuban music tradition uses  polyrhythms, which American musicians are less familiar with. Several of the Cuban musicians we worked with tried to teach us polyrhythms, and it was very difficult at first.” — Diana Gerberich Instructor Yosvany Terry returns home, where his musical destiny was formed Listen: Bata drums Related Kripke, the drummer, played alongside acclaimed percussionist Yaroldy Abreu, and was still star-struck afterward. “This past week I was constantly exposed to new rhythmic ideas, and different interpretations of the ones I knew. I was expecting this to be the case because of Cuba’s rich West African musical tradition. In the culminating concert, I tried to put all of my new knowledge to use. I incorporated ideas into my playing tonight that only a week ago I wouldn’t have considered. And Yaroldy looking over to me while letting out a joyous scream after I played some particularly Cuban-inspired fill was enough to know that I had succeeded.” After the concert, the band shared a late-night dinner with the luminaries, and Perlo declaring the week “mind-blowing.”“This will be my favorite memory of Harvard. On a music and jazz level, I’ve learned more in seven days than in a couple of years in a classroom,” he said.“I haven’t done many things in my life that have ended in an incredibly beautiful experience shared by 20 other people who will remember it for decades to come. It sounds like an overstatement, but I don’t think it will be.”Next week: A profile on music professor, jazz band director, and Cuban native Yosvany Terry and his journey home. Harvard jazz leader, amid his Cuban roots PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Listen: Los Muñequitos de Matanzaslast_img read more


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first_imgThe numbers show that it is actually tough on teams coming into Los Angeles to play the Clippers — but it’s more like kinda, sorta tough.The Clippers went 29-12 in home games last year — the seventh-best record in the league. But, for Doc Rivers, “seventh best” isn’t good enough for the Clippers to have a great season.“When you’re good and you’re really good, you should value home more and win games,” Rivers said. “I don’t think we did a good job of that last year. … Our record should have been a lot better. You look at how many games we won and consider how many home games we lost, we should have had much better regular season.“You have to win home games if you want to be a great team.”Last year was the second season in a row where the Clippers saw their home win totals decline. In that stretch, they’ve won 59 regular-season home games at Staples Center. Over the last two regular seasons, Golden State won 78 at home. San Antonio won 73. Cleveland won 64. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error The fix can only come from one place — within.“I feel like sometimes we’re a better road team than we are a home team, and that’s not good. I mean it’s good, but we want to be a great team at home and a really, really, really good team on the road,” DeAndre Jordan said. “We need to figure out how to transition that, and we’ll be fine, but we’ve got to pick it up at home.”“I feel like when we’re at home, we rely on our crowd, we rely on, ‘OK, we’re at home.’ But (when) we’re on the road, we know it’s us against everybody else in this arena, so that’s more motivation, more fire, I guess. So, we’ve got to find that same fire at home.”And, they’re not pointing fingers at the crowds. They’re pointing them at themselves.“Don’t get it twisted. Our crowd is behind us all day every day,” Paul said. “But, it’s us that have to give them a reason to a cheer and all that stuff like that. That’s on us as a team. The way we come out, we’ve got to provide that energy. “Mbah a Moute returnsNo decision on who will start the season opener has been officially made, but forward Luc Mbah a Moute, it at least appears, will be healthy enough to be in contention.Mbah a Moute missed the Clippers’ last two practices with a right knee contusion, an injury he suffered against Sacramento on Tuesday.“I bumped knees, so it kind of swelled up a little bit,” Mbah a Moute said before Saturday’s practice. “… I drove and somebody hit me in the knee. I don’t think he did it on purpose, but it’s right at the spot where it swelled up.”Mbah a Moute said he’s not that concerned with whether he starts the season as a starter or as a reserve; he just wants to help.“For us, whoever’s on the floor, especially at the three position, has to have that defensive mentality. On offense, he’s got to be a playmaker, contribute, make shots, and just play your game,” Mbah a Moute said. “For me, sometimes I started and I only played five, 10 minutes. Sometimes I didn’t start and played 25 minutes. Coach knows what he’s doing, and for me especially, just be ready, starting or coming off the bench. I know what I need to do. I know what my role is.”NotesDoc Rivers said Paul Pierce (ankle) remains out and will not be able to play against Portland in the season opener Thursday. … The Clippers have had a cluster of hard, scrimmage-filled practices since Thursday. The team is scheduled for a light practice Sunday and a day off Monday.center_img PLAYA VISTA >> The Clippers want to make this clear — what you’re about to read isn’t about the 19,000-plus fans in the seats. It’s not about the acoustics. It’s not about in-game operations, the dance team or the giant condor in the helmet and knee pads.The Clippers’ Staples Center problem isn’t about anyone other than the Clippers.Before the Clippers’ practices Saturday, Chris Paul wanted to talk about the problem, pivoting on a question about quick start to a different line of thought.“One of the biggest things for us is our home court hasn’t really been a home court. I don’t know. For some reason we just haven’t made it a tough place to play,” Paul said. “… Obviously it’s our mentality. We’re the ones playing. We have to give our crowd something to cheer about, something to get behind. We’ve got to make Staples Center, for our home games, a tough place to play.”last_img read more


Tag: 419爱上海

first_imgChelsea’s Juan Mata admitted his side found it tough playing Leeds in the cauldron of Elland Road.The atmosphere was electric – not least because of the long-standing rivalry between the two clubs – and Leeds led at half-time through Luciano Becchio’s opener.Chelsea stormed back to win 5-1 and take their place in the semi-finals of the Capital One Cup.But Mata told Sky Sports: “It is tough to play against a team like Leeds. It is a difficult stadium to play in and they have a physical team.”Blues midfielder Frank Lampard added: “We upped it in the second half. We were slow in the first but when we played with pace, you could see the difference.“We had a word with ourselves at half time and the early goal gave us an impetus to go on and win it.“Every trophy is a big deal for us, when we look back after our careers finish, we will look back on all our trips to Wembley.”Click here for our Leeds v Chelsea quizSee also:Chelsea strike back to demolish 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


Tag: 419爱上海

first_imgA biological motor has been found, of all places, on the seeds of wild wheat.  A team of German and Israeli scientists watched wheat seeds and found they could dig themselves into the ground.  How can a dry seed, with no muscles, nerves or circulatory system, accomplish such a feat?  It all becomes clear when you look under the awning.    You’ve probably seen the long strands attached to the seeds of grasses like wheat and oats.  These are called awns.  They’re not just decorative; they are actively involved in seed dispersal.  Once the seed drops to the ground, with awns still attached, a remarkable mechanism goes into action.  As the humidity rises and falls throughout the day and night, the awns respond by bending or twisting.    How does the bending take place?  At first, it seemed surprising anything would happen, because the tissues in cross section look uniform under an electron microscope.  The authors, though, found a remarkable feature: a “huge acoustic impedance contrast” in cross section that affects the stiffness of the awn shaft from one side to the other.  In cross section, the shaft resembles the shape of a mushroom with a cap.  The cap portion had twice the Young’s modulus as the stem – a stiffness the equivalent of spruce wood.  As humidity changes, the differential stiffness causes the entire awn to bend.  By analogy, consider how a bimetal strip, like the coil in a thermostat, bends and straightens in response to temperature.  Not only that, “silica tiles stiffen the epidermis and protect the structure as it interacts with the soil.”    So let’s follow the action in the wild.  The seed, awns and all, falls to the ground.  In real time, it might look like nothing is happening.  The seed, after all, is dead; its tissues are removed from any source of nourishment or internal energy.  A time lapse movie, however, shows the seed appearing to spring back to life.  This time, it’s a robotic life exacting its energy from the air.  The alternate bending and unbending of the awns gives a kind of “muscle” to the seed, propelling it along the ground – and even into the soil!    This mechanism for seed dispersal has been known for some time.  What’s new is that the scientists found tiny silicified hairs on the outside of the awns that act like a ratchet – they force the motion to go one way.  As a result, when oriented horizontally, the seed will swim like a frog along the ground.  (They actually said this: “The movement is reversible; thus, the humidity cycle causes a periodic movement of the awns, which resembles the swimming stroke of frog legs.”)  When oriented vertically, the seed acts like a power shovel.  The awns open and close like the handles of a post hole digger.  Meanwhile, those silicified hairs latch onto the soil particles, only allowing the seed to go down, not up.  Thus, the seed works its way deeper and deeper into the soil – safely out of the reach of predators, fire and drought.  “This suggests that the dead tissue is analogous to a motor,” they said.  “Fueled by the daily humidity cycle, the awns induce the motility required for seed dispersal.”    This mechanism is optimized, they said, for the soil environment of the Fertile Crescent, where civilization first began to farm wheat thousands of years ago.  In some kinds of domesticated wheat, the awns are no longer active.  The authors speculated that the length of time since domestication has reduced the function of the awns without removing them entirely.  Because humans now provide the muscle to plow the seeds into the soil, the awns have atrophied.  Apparently “use it or lose it” applies to seed muscle as well as the animal kind.    In their summary, the authors suggested that humans might gain additional nourishment from wheat – food for thought, that is.  The passive-muscle mechanism in wheat seeds might inspire, among other things, new ways to move weed killers where needed:The understanding of this seed dispersal mechanism may help in developing new concepts in weed control.  The microscopic mechanism found to provide motility to the seed may also serve as a model in biomimetic materials research.  Indeed, a hydration-dependent bending movement was recently reported in an artificial system consisting of nano-silicon columns embedded in a hydrogel film.  From a mechanistic point of view, we have discovered a device for movement that is composed of passive elements.  Locomotion is provided by a volume containing nonoriented cellulose crystallites that shortens on drying and pulls the awn like a muscle.  The energy source for this active movement is the daily cycle of air humidity.Maybe someday artificial muscles in robotic devices will work without batteries, extracting the energy they need from the environment – all inspired by the slender filaments on the grass at your feet.1Elbaum, Zaltzman, Burgert and Fratzl, “The Role of Wheat Awns in the Seed Dispersal Unit,” Science, 11 May 2007: Vol. 316. no. 5826, pp. 884-886, DOI: 10.1126/science.1140097.A passive muscle driven by moisture in the air—amazing.  Could a lowly grass figure out that it needed both a tissue differential with the right acoustic impedance to produce bending at the correct Young’s modulus, at the same time that it needed silicified hairs to act as a ratchet?  Without both, this “frog” would swim in place and get nowhere.  And what contractor laid the silica tiles?  Silicon is not a normal part of plant tissue; it had to be guided into place by epidermal cells while the seed was growing.  The fibrils in the awns, also, need to be arranged exactly right to produce the differential impedance.  The arrangement of all the parts needs to be complete before the mechanism will work.  Think of that – then think about the additional wonder that there are more motors, ratchets and machines at work, on a much smaller scale, inside every cell of the plant.    It was nice of the authors to spare us any evolutionary just-so stories about how this all came together by chance.  Their only use of the E word was in reference to human history: “The short evolutionary time since domestication (about 10,000 years), probably allowed the complete loss of awns in several domesticated wheat lines, but not the alteration of the awn structure.”  If so, this is a case of devolution, not evolution.  They actually used the word design twice.*  Anyone believing evolution could design this mechanism needs to eat more whole wheat to provide better nourishment to the brain.    The authors provided a couple of short time-lapse video clips to illustrate the bending action, but the best way to see this is to get a copy of the wonderful Moody Video production called Journey of Life.  The filmmakers made an eye-popping time-lapse sequence of wild oat seeds, which propel themselves by a similar mechanism, but with twisting action instead of bending.  You would swear you were looking at insects crawling along the ground instead of plant seeds.  This and many other ingenious seed-dispersal mechanisms are wonderfully illustrated in this film (also recapped in Part 1 of the trilogy Wonders of God’s Creation).**    Plants may seem passive, anchored to the ground.  In their own ways, though, they get around like world travelers: crawling, climbing, boating, ballooning, launching, helicoptering, hitchhiking and hunting (e.g., Venus flytrap), surprising us each time with their built-in ingenuity.*Anecdote:  One of the authors of the paper works for the Biotechnology Department of the Tel Hai Academic College in Upper Galilee, Israel.  This is in the vicinity where a certain Teacher told some parables about wheat and sowing (e.g., Matthew 13).  He also said, “I tell you the truth, unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed.  But if it dies, it produces many seeds.” (John 12:24).  He was speaking in reference to the results His impending death would accomplish.**Project:  This article and the Moody films suggest a science project for your junior-high or high-school student.  Many video camcorders have a time-lapse function (sometimes called interval timer).  If you already own one, you have the most expensive part of a good science project.  Look for backyard weeds and grasses with awns or other external structures; for instance, the seeds of filaree (Erodium cicurarium) work like little power drills.  Suggest a hypothesis for how the shape of the seed contributes to its dispersal.  Build a terrarium where you can control the cycles of temperature and humidity using electrical timers, and use the camcorder interval timer to record the action.  Show your video clips with your display at the science fair.  This seems like a sure way to attract the attention of the judges – and the envy of the other students.  Better still, a demonstration of biological design might kindle some thoughts about a Designer. 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Tag: 419爱上海

first_imgWilma den HartighFind out more about using MediaClubSouthAfrica.com materialSouth Africa’s national youth HIV prevention campaign,  LoveLife, has launched a new initiative to fight the spread of HIV and Aids by building identity and self-worth in young people.The campaign tag, L2 M3 What’s your formula? (L2 = loving life M3 = making my move), is a slight change of tack from the previous “Make Your Move” initiative. L2 M3 builds on the earlier campaign that encouraged people to take control of their lives and believe in themselves.“Youth is a time of turbulence for all young people and issues of identity are massive,” said  LoveLife CEO Grace Matlhape. “This is why our starting point is self-worth.”The new approach puts the spotlight on the absence of belonging and purpose, particularly in the lives of marginalised young people.  “We know that awareness of HIV is high, but young people still put up with risk and we want to address to reduce people’s risk tolerance,” Matlhape said.The campaign will focus on the way young people perceive their circumstances and how they deal with societal pressures. “Without a sense of future, identity and self-worth, youngsters may have little motivation to protect themselves from infection,” she said in a statement.One of the main goals of the campaign is to get young people to think about their future and how they plan to achieve their goals. Trina DasGupta, media director for  Lovelife, explained that young people can only do this if they understand their identity. “The formula will address the universal teen feeling of invisibility and the desire for acceptance, as well as provide an alternative to materialism, which is often used today to achieve acknowledgement,” DasGupta said.HIV/Aids communication programmes in South AfricaMatlhape emphasised that even though a lot of work still needs to be done to bring the pandemic under control, the importance of HIV/Aids communication programmes in South Africa should not be underestimated.The recent Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) National HIV/Aids survey findings suggest that HIV/Aids communication programmes have helped to highlight the importance of testing, the dangers of risky sexual behaviour and knowledge of HIV.Of South Africa’s four large-scale ongoing national programmes – LoveLife, Khomanani, Soul City and Soul Buddyz – LoveLife and Soul City had a high reach into the youth age group. In 2008,  LoveLife reached 79.1% of youth aged 15 to 24. Interestingly, although  LoveLife is considered to mainly target the youth, its reach also extended to 71.2% of adults in the 25 to 49 years age group.The findings also show a slight decrease of HIV prevalence, from 10.3% in 2005 to 8.6% in 2008, among youth between the ages of 15 to 24. This decrease is attributed to a significant increase in condom use among males and females within this age group. It is also believed that HIV communication programmes that reach a large population within this age group may have played a role in HIV education.Matlhape said that she is encouraged by the survey findings.  “It gives us feedback on how young people are responding to the messages they are receiving and the survey shows a shift in thinking, particularly in young people.”The 2009  LoveLife media campaign will run for a year. Various media will be used, including television, radio public service announcements, radio programmes on 22 stations nationwide, print, a new-look website, as well as  LoveLife’s mobile social network, www.mymsta.mobi.Related articlesFree Femidoms free women HIV in South Africa stabilising Changing SA one heart at a time Preventing HIV with OneLove Anti-Aids gel offers hope Useful linksLoveLife Human Sciences Research CouncilSouth African National HIV Prevalence,Incidence, Behaviour and Communication Survey, 2008 Medical Research CouncilCentre for Aids Development, Research and EvaluationDepartment of Healthlast_img read more


Tag: 419爱上海

first_imgPlanned for a site about 30 miles west of Philadelphia, Three Groves Ecovillage will add to the uptick in cohousing communities that have embraced energy efficiency and other green building goals.As currently designed, Three Groves will include solar thermal and photovoltaic systems with enough capacity to allow the community to operate at net zero energy. Its site management, construction, and materials strategies, meanwhile, are aimed at earning the project LEED for Homes Platinum certification.Cohousing has so far found its way to 38 states, according to the Cohousing Association of the United States, whose directory lists almost 250 cohousing projects in the U.S. Eight of those projects are in Pennsylvania. And though not all ecovillages adopt the characteristics of cohousing communities (such as a resident-directed site plan that clusters residences around a common house), many cohousing communities have embraced ecovillage concepts of environmental stewardship, which typically include energy-efficient housing and renewable-energy systems.Ecovillage and cohousing compatibility Abundance EcoVillage, a community of 14 homes on 15 acres in Fairfield, Iowa, for example, is not a cohousing development, although the homeowners there do share the cost of maintaining the community’s renewable-energy systems – two wind turbines (one with a capacity of 3 kW, the other with a 5 kW potential output), and a 7-kW photovoltaic array.Meanwhile, EcoVillage at Ithaca, in upstate New York, is a true cohousing community of 60 units whose planned third neighborhood, a 40-unit project, is expected to include about 25 homes built to the Passivhaus standard.Three Groves Ecovillage homes, nine of which have been sold so far, will range in size from 1,193 square feet for a one-bedroom home to 1,965 square feet for a four-bedroom home, with prices ranging from about $200,000 to the low $400,000s. Monthly housing costs – including mortgage, taxes, and energy costs – are expected to average $1,752.We’ve asked Three Groves for details about the insulation and expected airtightness of the units and will include that information when it becomes available.last_img read more


Tag: 419爱上海

first_imgEditor’s note: This is one in a series of blogs detailing the construction of a net-zero-energy house in Point Roberts, Washington, by an owner-builder with relatively little building experience. A list of Matt Bath’s GBA articles can be found at the bottom of this page. You’ll find Matt Bath’s full blog, Saving Sustainably, here. If you want to follow project costs, you can keep an eye on a budget worksheet here. After passing the insulation inspection, I had permission to enclose the walls. I used gypsum drywall, the most common interior wall-covering product on the market. Drywall, best known by brand names such as Sheetrock, consists mainly of gypsum pressed between two thick sheets of paper. It is very easy to install and paint, is fire resistant, and finds a good balance between strength and flexibility. It is also an excellent tool for saving sustainably as it is relatively inexpensive and also 100% recyclable.RELATED ARTICLESDrywall Finishing Tips for Owner-BuildersHow to Hang Airtight DrywallBeazer’s Settlement Over Chinese Drywall I’ve learned a few lessons over the course of building my own home. One of them is that a good tool will almost always pay for itself in saved time and headache. I bought a few tools to help make installation easier and I highly recommend them to someone doing a project of this size. The first is a drywall screw gun. Each sheet of drywall takes at least 30 screws and I had more than 150 sheets to install. That’s more than 4500 screws! With a drywall screw gun you can just turn it on so it is always running. That way you can focus your attention on your left hand and getting the next screw ready. It also has a depth setting to ensure that screws are set to the correct depth without tearing the paper. Like most tools, it takes some practice to really get the hang of it but once I’d hung the first 50 sheets or so I really started to get faster. The second tool is a cutout tool, also known by the brand name RotoZip. It also takes some getting used to, but after using it for a while you really start to get quick with it. The tool uses a special bit that will follow along any solid surface, so you can use it to cut out window openings and electrical boxes, or just install end of wall sections long and use it to cut off the excess. It works very quickly and saves a ton of time. With more than 150 sheets of drywall to install, buying two specialized tools was well worth the money. Where possible, I used drywall clips instead of adding wood framing to support the drywall. On exterior walls, using clips allowed more room in the stud bays for insulation. They also were very handy on interior walls. There were many places where I would have needed to add an additional piece of wood to attach the drywall; it was much easier to screw in a clip. Using drywall clips instead of framing lumber made odd corners easier to assemble. In exterior walls, clips helped make room for additional insulation. Clips were especially handy as backing where I had a 45° wall intersection, as I would have otherwise had to bevel the edge of a stud. The beauty of drywall is that you really don’t need a lot of tools and you don’t need a lot of precision, either. The joint compound I will be applying next will easily cover up any gaps in the drywall. Resilient channel reduces noise Normally, drywall is installed on the ceiling first followed by the upper half of the wall, then the lower half of the wall. I had already installed the second-floor ceiling, but I still needed to install the ceiling for the first floor. To reduce the noise from footsteps upstairs I hung the drywall from  resilient channel attached to the bottom of the floor joists. Resilient channel installed between second-floor joists and the drywall will reduce sound traveling through the floor. Resilient channel is a strip of metal that works to decouple sound vibrations between building materials. If I installed the drywall directly to the floor joists, the vibrations from footsteps and the washer and dryer and water heater would carry straight through the floor to the joists and straight through to the drywall. The resilient channel breaks this direct path. It is screwed to the floor joists, and then the drywall is screwed to the resilient channel, which is especially designed to eliminate contact between the two materials. I installed the channel perpendicular to the floor joists every 16 in. I used a 14-in.-long block to help me space the channel as I put it up with drywall screws. It is crucial to make sure that all of the screws going through the drywall penetrate only the resilient channel, not the floor joists. The channel is easy to trim to size with metal snips, and pieces can overlap to create a splice. The installation was very quick and easy. Tackling exterior walls I hung drywall on the exterior walls next. If you recall, I had left a 3/4-in. gap wherever an interior partition wall met an exterior wall, and then installed ladder framing in the exterior wall. This makes both air-sealing and drywall installation easier. I could easily slide a 1/2-in.-thick sheet of drywall through the 3/4-in. gap. Top and bottom plates of interior partitions are held 3/4 in. away from the exterior wall, allowing drywall to slip in place without being cut at the intersection. Ladder framing in the exterior wall (visible behind the insulation netting) will support the last stud. Next, I added in the final stud and nailed it to both the ladder framing and the top and bottom plates. Now it was ready for the installation of the interior walls. The last wall stud can then be nailed into place. Dealing with arches and curves Hanging drywall on interior walls was slightly more complex because there were curves, arches, and niches to deal with. That’s the great thing about building your own home, though. You get to include all of the beautiful, custom features that you have always wanted. I designed the house to have a curved wall to wrap around a spiral staircase, as the photo below shows. This should be one of the more aesthetically pleasing elements of the house. But it was a bit of a pain, not only to frame but also when it came time to hang drywall on the ceiling and the walls. Drywall destined for a curved wall in the stairwell had to be scored to make the bend. Convex surfaces required dampening the back of the sheet as well as scoring. Drywall does bend, but not enough to make this radius. In order to make it work, I started by scoring the back of the sheet every 1-1/2 in. Next, I sprayed the back liberally with water, working it into the scored areas especially. The moisture dampens the gypsum, allowing it to flex more. I wrapped it around the wall and pulled it tight with clamps, and then left it to dry. A few hours later I was able to remove the clamps and the curve remained. At this point I was able to lift it into place on the wall and attach it with drywall screws. The arches I designed to cover the ductwork are created the same way, but the drywall didn’t require water because it was being bent away from the back side of the sheet instead of toward it (concave curves as opposed to convex). The gypsum snaps at each of the scored lines, but the paper on front remains intact, allowing the sheet to form into a curve. The important thing is to ensure all of the screws are put into the gypsum, not just the paper. The large curved wall that wraps around the spiral staircase also had this type of curve where the drywall is bent away from the back side. I created these in the same manner. Hanging these sheets was complicated by the fact that they were installed in the stairwell. For smaller drywall arches, I used 1/4-in.-thick sheets. Then comes the mud When you look at a long wall in a modern building, it looks to be one single piece of painted, textured drywall. In reality, any long wall is made up of several different sheets of drywall. Taping is the part that makes it all look seamless. Ready-mix joint compound like the kind I am using is made primarily of limestone and water, mixed with other additives like talcum (baby powder) and perlite (volcanic glass). Even though it is called ready-mix, it is highly recommended to add a couple handfuls of water and mix it really well with a drill-mounted mixing paddle before applying it. Some joint compounds contain plaster of Paris, which hardens a lot faster. It’s a good idea that before doing any taping you take some of this “hot mud,” as the pros call it, and fill any large gaps, especially in corners or inside edges. The hot mud comes in a powder form, and you simply add water and mix it up until it has a workable consistency. I used a 6-in. taping knife to apply the hot mud to any gaps over 1/8 in. wide. Before applying any drywall compound or tape, make sure that screwheads do not protrude above the paper. The other thing you need to do before you begin drywall taping is to make sure that all of the screws sit just below the surface of the drywall. I took my taping knife and ran it over each screw and if I heard a click, I knew it was sticking out and would interfere with the tape. I gave these screws a quarter turn or so until they were below the surface of the drywall. If you used a drywall screwgun like I did, there shouldn’t be too many of these to deal with. Start taping in the corners With the gaps filled and screws set, I was now ready to start taping. Starting in the corners, I loaded up my hawk with joint compound and used my 6-in. taping knife to butter up both sides of a corner. It’s best to load up only the front edge of the knife with mud and then hold the knife sideways to apply it so you end up with just a 3-in.- to 4-in.-wide streak of mud on the wall. You definitely don’t need a 6-in.-wide bead of mud, and that’s what you’ll get if you simply run the front edge of the knife down the wall vertically. As with many, many other skills used in building a house, it will take some practice to get the hang of using the side of the knife smoothly, but if you just keep trying you can become pretty skillful rather quickly. Use a 6-in. taping knife held sideways to apply joint compound in a corner. Follow this by removing excess mud with the knife held straight. I measured a piece of tape to fit the corner from top to bottom and folded it in half along the crease, then applied it to the corner. I removed the excess mud by holding the taping knife straight. It is best to start from the bottom and go up to avoid excessive dripping. Drywall paper tape must be mudded on both sides, so I then repeated the process to get the front side of the tape, applying the mud with the knife sideways and removing it with the knife held straight. I taped the flats next. The long edges of drywall sheets are tapered so when you have two of these long edges together, they create a tiny ditch. The tape fits inside this ditch so that after you are done taping you are left with a flat surface. As with the corners, the flats are buttered up, the tape is applied and flattened out, the tape is buttered, and then the knife removes all of the excess mud. When the tape is applied, it should not overlap the corner tape that was already applied. The last seam to tape is the butt joints. These are the places where the short edges of the drywall sheets come together. Unfortunately, they are not tapered. This means that the tape will sit on top of the drywall and create a hump. With several coats of joint compound, I widened this hump so it was so gradual that I couldn’t tell it was there. Drywall taping goes a lot faster when you use less mud rather than apply a ton of mud and then have to sand off all the excess. In addition, joint compound should be applied over the heads of all the screws. You can hit a row of them in just two swipes of the taping knife by applying mud holding the knife sideways in one stroke, and then rotating the knife straight to wipe the excess mud off with the front of the knife. A big thank you to DIY RenoVision for their excellent videos that really helped out! Other blogs by Matt Bath: An Introduction Foundation Formwork Designing and Installing a Septic System Pouring the Slab Framing the First Floor Framing the Second Floor Framing the Roof Shingling the Roof Wall Sheathing Installing Drains and Vents Plumbing Rough-In Completing the Dry-In Electrical Rough-In Installing the Ventilation System Installing Trim and Siding Air Sealing and Insulationlast_img read more