Be ready

Tag: 广州百花丛登录

first_img By The Penny Hoarder Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Book Nook to reopen Fran Byrd, of Science Applications International Corporation, demonstrates life-saving techniques to school children attending the Be Ready Day events at Troy University on Thursday. Byrd was one of several dozen participants who shared information to the public about preparing for disaster before it strikes. (Photo/Jaine Treadwell)Preparedness event educates publicTroy University hosted “Be Ready Day,” the state’s official disaster preparedness event on Thursday at the Tailgate Terrace and Trojan Arena areas.“Be Ready Day” was set aside by Gov. Robert Bentley to focus the attention of Alabamians on what state and local agencies, volunteer organizations and, most importantly, individual citizens can do to prepare for disaster before it strikes and the steps individuals can take during and after a disaster. The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Email the author Latest Stories Be ready By Jaine Treadwell Sponsored Content Published 11:00 pm Thursday, September 8, 2011 Print Article Yvon Brantley, program teacher, said the “Be Ready Day” brought to the students’ attention the need to be prepared for disasters as well as other emergency situations.“We learned that that it’s very important to be ready for any kind of emergency,” said Lindsay Lee. “You never know when something tragic is going to happen and, if you don’t have some idea of how to respond, then the situation probably will be worse because you didn’t know what to do.”Kush Patel said he was impressed by the amount of equipment that is available to those who respond to disasters.“There are first responders for every situation,” he said. “If it’s chemical emergency, there are people especially trained for that but, if it’s a disaster where a lot of people are hurt, there’s a plan for that.”Corey Bandy said that he was impressed by the many agencies that are trained to handle emergency situations.“It’s good to know that we have so many people to help us where emergencies happen,” he said.A part of National Preparedness Month, Alabama’s “Be Ready Day” is sponsored by the Governor’s Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, the Alabama Department of Homeland Security, the Alabama Emergency Management Agency and Troy University. You Might Like Mayor: City budget on track Budgeting work is under way for the City of Troy, and the mayor plans to have a draft of the… read more Skip “Be Ready Day” featured displays of equipment from first responders, state agencies and volunteer organizations active in disasters and focused on the state’s attention on being prepared for disasters well before they hit, said Dean of Students Herb Reeves, who coordinated the on-campus event.“Troy University was honored to be asked to host ‘Be Ready Day’ and be a part of a program that recognizes first responders and the commemoration of the 10th anniversary of 9/11,” Reeves said.About 36 vendors participated in the “Be Ready Day” event that Reeves said was a great success. “In addition to the state agencies that participated we had a large number of local participants including the Troy and Brundidge police departments, the Troy Fire Department and the Meeksville and Banks volunteer fire departments. Our local EMA and Red Cross also had exhibits.”Reeves said all schools in the county, as well as area schools, were invited to participate.“We has students from as far away as Lanier in Montgomery to participate,” he said. “From the local area, the Pike County schools, Charles Henderson and Pike Liberal Arts participated.”Thirty-eight students in Charles Henderson Middle School’s enrichment program attended the “Be Ready Day” activities and said the vendor booths and equipment displays were educational as well as fun. Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more


Tag: 广州百花丛登录

first_imgThe Second Best Trail in the Blue Ridge: The Art Loeb Trail is the highlight reel of the Southern Appalachia.Some days, everything seems to go your way. You make every traffic light, your favorite song plays on the radio, and you arrive at a quiet trailhead with no other cars in the parking lot. The sun smiles down on you from bluebird skies, and every step feels effortless.This was not one of those days.I was attempting to run the North Carolina’s Art Loeb Trail, the second-best footpath in the Blue Ridge—only the Appalachian Trail offers more. The Art Loeb is a highlight reel of Southern Appalachia—panoramic balds, pristine headwaters, unspoiled wilderness—packed into 31 scenic miles. I was hoping to run all of it in a single day.The Art Loeb Trail has been featured in every outdoor magazine (including this one), yet few ever tackle it end-to-end. Maybe it’s the name. Art Loeb was an overworked businessman who had a heart attack in his early 40s. He began walking in the woods. Eventually he connected a series of trails across the highest peaks and scenic stretches of Southern Appalachia.Today, the Art Loeb Trail is a mini-A.T., offering all of the high-elevation grandeur without all of the crowds. It is the best of trails; it is the worst of trails. It is butter-smooth singletrack near the Davidson River and a shin-bashing boulderdash through the raw Shining Rock wilderness. It is a thin ribbon of trail between panoramic heaven and laurel hell.A downpour greeted me at the trailhead, located on the northern edge of the Shining Rock Wilderness. I slipped on my hydration pack, stuffed with a few energy bars and gels, and plunged into the deluge. In the first three miles, the trail climbed 3,000 feet through thorn-choked overgrowth. I skidded across rain-slickened rock and face-planted in the mud. Then I reached an unmarked five-way trail junction—and realized my map was still in the car.A pink ribbon marked one of the trail options, so I decided to follow it—back down 3,000 feet to the next valley and several miles off-trail.Backtracking, I finally arrived back at the five-way junction and guessed wrong again. This time, I ended up on the summit of Cold Mountain, made famous by Charles Frazier’s novel. Views from the 6,000-foot peak should have made my sidetrack worthwhile, but the vistas were hidden behind the clouds’ gray gauze.I returned to the junction once more and finally found the main trail, which headed south toward the wilderness namesake. Shining Rock is a glittering quartz cap atop a nearly 6,000-foot ridge. To get there required crawling on all fours, slashing through brambles, and splashing through ankle-deep water for miles.Finally, the wilderness tunnel opened into a panorama of 6,000-foot peaks, including Black Balsam. When I arrived at the summit, gale-force winds nearly blew me off the mountain.I plunged down the flooded trail and arrived at the Blue Ridge Parkway. I checked my watch: I only had four hours left to cover the remaining 19 miles before nightfall, and of course, my headlamp was back in the car with my map.I shivered in the cold rain, watching tourists drive by in their cozy SUVs. This was the only road crossing and my last chance to bail. I reluctantly pressed on.Slick rock and mud underfoot made even the downhill miles slow-going. The rain intensified. “Focus on the positive,” I said out loud. But I could think of only one positive at that moment: I had plenty of water.As I slogged up Pilot Mountain, I tried to think shiny, happy thoughts. I repeated the oft-quoted mantra, “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” But today, I needed to just shut up and eat my damn lemons.I recalled reading the make-lemonade quote in a bedtime book to my three-year-old son. “I’m thirsty,” he replied.Remembering this, I accidentally smiled. It spilled into out-loud laughter as I replayed my string of bad decisions and bad luck. Amid the storm, an inverted rainbow had appeared.Let me be clear: I’ve always resented the overly cheery pixies who exhort everyone to SMILE! Phony smilers annoy the hell out of me. This was different. As that surprise smile spread across my face, I felt a wave of ease ripple through my body. My jaw unclenched, my stiff legs loosened, the tightness in my chest lifted, and for the first time all day, I was having fun.It’s easy to be positive and feel good when the sun is shining, but it’s only when things aren’t going your way, when you aren’t in the zone, when nothing is clicking, that your character is put to the test. And isn’t that really what adventure is all about?For the rest of the run, I soaked it all in—literally. My waterlogged shoes were lead weights around my feet, but I plodded the trail without the added heaviness of a bad attitude. Yes, it was raining sideways and numbingly cold, and I had wasted hours wandering lost in the wilderness. But I was alive, grateful to spend even this unlucky day exchanging my breath with the forest.Four hours later, I glided down to the Davidson River trailhead just as darkness was swallowing the twilight forest. I was utterly destroyed—trashed quads, blistered feet, bloody nipples—but not defeated. I looked up into the wet sky and smiled.– Will HarlanEditor in Chieflast_img read more


Tag: 广州百花丛登录

first_imgThe university jumped 18 spots this year to No. 55 on the Times Higher Education World University Rankings list.The Times rankings, published Oct. 6., placed USC just under Boston University at No. 54 and just above King’s College London at No. 56. USC was ranked below UCLA, which came in at No. 13. California Institute of Technology, Harvard University and Stanford University took the first three spots, respectively.In September, U.S. News & World Report ranked USC 23rd in the country above UCLA at No. 25.The Times evaluates universities worldwide in five major categories: teaching, international outlook, industry income, research and citations. A score out of 100 is generated for each category and the scores, weighted based on their significance, are combined to determine an overall score.USC received a score of 41 in international outlook, its lowest individual score.Even with the overall jump, some students said they were unsure about the results of the evaluation. The low score in the international outlook category confused students, because USC holds a reputation as one of the most international schools in the United States.“USC advertises itself as the most international school in the nation and we have a lot of study abroad,” said Julia Thomas, a junior majoring in theatre.Thomas also expressed surprise at the university’s low teaching score, a major factor in the difference between USC and UCLA on the rankings chart.“We have an excellent teaching staff,” Thomas said. “A lot of the people I’ve talked to have only had great things to say about their professors.”The five categories are comprised of 13 separate performance indicators. These indicators are either statistical data, such as faculty-to-student ratio or Ph.D. degrees awarded per bachelor’s degrees, or interpretations of the results from the Academic Reputation Survey, a worldwide poll conducted by the Times and completed by 17,500 experienced university scholars. The Times said it has full confidence in its unique ranking methods.USC earned an overall score of 64 out of 100, faring best in industry income, a measure of innovation, and in citations, a measure of the number of faculty members referenced in professional journals.Last year’s score of 60.7 rose because the sub-scores in all five categories increased or remained the same, with a nearly 10 percent increase in citations and international outlook. USC also provided the Times with industry income data this year, which it did not previously offer, earning a score of 99.3 in the category.Students also voiced doubts about the accuracy of the Times’ core ranking methodology — the Academic Reputation Survey.“If you do have a ranking system, it should be based on the contributions of the students who come out of the school,” said Svadharma Keerthi, a freshman majoring in biological sciences.Sara Burton, a sophomore majoring in music industry, said colleges appeal to students for a variety of reasons and these reasons cannot be encompassed in a college ranking.“The whole thing is really silly, that there’s a ranking system at all,” Burton said. “Each person is going to have a different reason to go to college and the college they choose is going to be based on what they want, not on what people say is the best place to go.”last_img read more