Sri Lankan presidential candidates asked to guarantee editorial independence

Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_imgDeep polarization November 6, 2019 Sri Lankan presidential candidates asked to guarantee editorial independence News Help by sharing this information July 15, 2020 Find out more Sri LankaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsMedia independence CorruptionDisappearances The “unruly behaviour” was refusing to publish a dubious item favourable to Gotabaya Rajapaksa, a presidential candidate in the 16 November elections. Rajool’s former boss, Sathasivam, is reportedly very close to a politician in the city of Jaffna who is supporting Rajapaksa’s candidacy. “The way K. M. Razool was threatened and then fired is typical of the constant harassment to which Sri Lankan journalists are subjected in their work,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “The 16 November presidential election will lack any legitimacy if journalists cannot practice their profession with complete independence. We therefore call on the two main candidates to give specific undertakings to defend press freedom in general and journalists’ editorial autonomy in particular.” Receive email alerts Regardless of who wins the election, the behaviour of Sri Lanka’s next president with regard to press freedom will be scrutinized closely and he will need to quickly reassure journalists, who have every reason to be concerned. Sri Lanka: RSF signs joint statement on attacks against human rights defenders, lawyers and journalists January 13, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Sri Lanka to go further RSF already reported a disturbing increase in police attacks on Tamil journalists last May, coinciding with the celebrations to mark the 10th anniversary of the official end to Sri Lanka’s civil war. The other is Gotabaya Rajapaksa, the candidate of the Sri Lanka People’s Freedom Alliance and brother of another former president, Mahinda Rajapaksa, whose ten years in office, from 2005 to 2015, are described by reporters as a “dark decade,” one in which at least fourteen journalists were murdered in connection with their work, according to RSF’s barometer. Sri Lanka’s journalists therefore have strong grounds for viewing the outcome of this election with concern, both for their editorial freedom and for their physical safety. Both candidates are riding a tide of Sinhalese and Buddhist ethno-nationalist rhetoric that is hostile to the Tamil and Muslim minorities, so reporters from these communities fear being the victims of even greater pressure. News Sri Lanka currently has no legislation that guarantees the editorial independence of journalists or prevents conflicts of interests between media owners and politicians. It is ranked 126th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. Sri LankaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsMedia independence CorruptionDisappearances July 29, 2020 Find out more The Media Ownership Monitor report on Sri Lanka that RSF exclusively published in November 2018 showed a deep polarization in the Sri Lankan media landscape linked to a particularly high level of politically-linked ownership concentration. Fewer than 20% of Sri Lankans have access to newspapers that are not directly affiliated to a politician. “He shouted at me, threatened me and even nearly assaulted me,” former Capital FM Tamil-language news editor K. M. Razool told RSF, referring to the way he was treated on 16 October by Vincendrarajan Sathasivam, the head of Trymas Media, the company that owns Capital FM. Supporters of presidential candidates Sajith Premadasa (left) and Gotabaya Rajapaksa (right) brandish placards during separate meetings last month in Colombo (Photos: Lakruwan Wanniarachchi / AFP). Dark decade Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on Sri Lanka’s presidential candidates to give firm pledges to respect press freedom after a media owner threatened and then fired a radio news editor for refusing to broadcast fabricated and biased information, in an incident that speaks volumes about intimidation of journalists in Sri Lanka. During his brother’s presidency, Gotabaya Rajapaksa was secretary of defence and used the position to crack down hard on journalists. He was, for example, said to have been directly implicated in the murder of the Sunday Leader’s well-known editor, Lasantha Wickramatunga, who was gunned down on 8 January 2009 after reporting that Gotabaya Rajapaksa was receiving backhanders. RSF_en News Sri Lanka: tamil reporter held on absurd terrorism charge Razool said the outburst was prompted by his refusal ”as the news editor” to publish content “based on unverified sources and biased in favour of a particular political party.” He received a letter the next day firing him for “unruly behaviour.” News Organisation One of the two leading candidates, the New Democratic Front’s Sajith Premadasa, is the son of former President Ranasinghe Premadasa, who is remembered for repeatedly violating press freedom during his term of office from 1989 to 1993. Constant pressure Sri Lanka: Journalist manhandled by notorious police inspector currently on trial After 2015, a former army chief reported that Gotabaya Rajapaksa had created a special unit known as the “Tripoli Platoon” whose sole job was getting rid of the journalists he disliked. Its speciality was abducting reporters in white vans and then killing them, with the result that Rajapaksa was nicknamed the head of the “white van commando.”last_img read more


Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_imgGovernment Rep. Chu Leads Opposition to Republican Move to Defund Planned Parenthood Published on Friday, September 18, 2015 | 11:11 am More Cool Stuff 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a comment Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Herbeauty10 Secrets That Eastern Women Swear By To Stay Young LongerHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThink Outside The Ordinary: 9 Gifts That Do All The Talking!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Special Massage Techniques That Will Make You Return For MoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeauty Subscribecenter_img Top of the News Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Today, the House of Representatives voted on two bills that would drastically reduce access to healthcare for women, H.R. 3134, the Defund Planned Parenthood Act, and H.R. 3504, the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act. Together, these two bills would leave women without preventative health services like cancer screenings and family planning and would inappropriately and dangerously change the doctor-patient relationship through unnecessary requirements and draconian penalties. Rep. Judy Chu (CA-27) managed the debate on the House floor for the Democrats on H.R. 3504 and released the following statement:Misleading titles cannot hide the real intent behind these bills: further undermining a woman’s right to choose, a right that has been constitutionally guaranteed for more than 42 years by Roe v. Wade. Not only do these bills attempt to politicize women’s health and limit women’s access to abortion, they would interfere with the sacred doctor-patient relationship and substitute a physician’s best judgment with the judgment of a handful of politicians.“Defunding Planned Parenthood, as Republicans want, would have a devastating impact on women—especially women in rural communities, low-income women, and women of color —and would deny women access to preventive care, life-saving cancer screenings, and family planning services.“It is a blatant attack on women and families to defund an organization that uses federal funds to prevent abortions and to help families stay healthy, and cannot even use federal funding for abortion. It would be the saddest of ironies that, by defunding Planned Parenthood’s critical contraception and other reproductive health services in the name of opposing abortion, we would see more unintended pregnancies and, therefore, more abortions.“Politicians are not doctors. We should be concerned about doing our jobs and fully fund high-quality women are health care instead of trying to keep doctors from doing theirs.” Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more


Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_imgThe finalists in the Baking Industry Awards (BIA) 2015 have been unveiled.  With three hopefuls left in the running in each of 10 categories, all will be revealed at the London Hilton on Park Lane on Wednesday 9 September when the baking industry will gather for the ceremony. Around 800 guests will watch as 11 awards are given out by this year’s host and TV star Claudia Winkleman, including the Outstanding Contribution Award – the winner of which is chosen through a nomination process rather than by entries.The coveted Baker of the Year award, last year scooped by Mark Bennett of Patisserie Mark Bennett, will also be awarded.Martyn Leek, British Baker editor, said: “Every year the Baking Industry Awards get better as judges have more difficulty picking winners from the high standard of entries we receive. It is a perfect opportunity to reflect on the past year as outstanding accomplishments, by both individuals and companies, are applauded by the UK’s largest gathering of baking industry professionals.”Aside from the awards, the night presents a perfect opportunity to network with peers, meet new people and keep abreast of the latest in the baking industry. Plenty of entertainment is provided after the three-course meal and awards, with all guests invited to fill the dance floor.Don’t miss out and book your ticket now by calling Elizabeth Ellis on 01293 846593 or email her at [email protected] Tickets cost £268 each or guests can buy a table of 10 for £2,420.The finalists:Baker of the Year, sponsored by Brook FoodsRichard Bertinet, The Bertinet BakeryAlex Gooch, Alex Gooch Artisan BakerDominic Salter, The Sandwich BoxThe Craft Business Award, sponsored by Dawn FoodsJ & I Smith BakersPatisserie Mark Bennett  Warrens BakeryThe Customer Focus Award, sponsored by CSM UKAB MauriGreenhalgh’sThe Kitchen CroxleyThe Innovation Award, sponsored by AsdaGluten-Free Bread Home Baking Mix, Bakels Pão de Queijo, IreksHand-held Pies, Proper CornishFree-from Bakery Product of the Year, sponsored by IngredionGenius Crumpets, Genius Gluten Free Incredible Onion Panini, Incredible Bakery CompanySour Cherry Bakewell, Four AnjelsThe Rising Star Award, sponsored by Craft Bakers’ AssociationAnnie Body, Annie’s BakeryNathan Giles, Nicholas & HarrisCatherine Postance, Coopland & Son (Scarborough) In-store Bakery Bakery Retailer of the Year, sponsored by ZeelandiaAsdaMorrisonsSainsbury’sTescoBakery Manufacturer of the Year, sponsored by SonneveldDavid Wood BakingFinsbury Food GroupSoreenSpeciality Bread Product of the Year, sponsored by BakelsChocolate Sourdough with Praline Almonds, Peter Cooks Bread Seeded Sourdough, Reeve the BakerRaspberry & White Chocolate Brioche Swirl, Greenhalgh’s Craft BakeryCelebration Cake Business of the Year, sponsored by RenshawBrowns Cakes Finsbury Food GroupZoe’s Fancy Cakeslast_img read more


Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_imgPaying hospitals to improve their quality of care, known as pay-for-performance, has gained wide acceptance in the U.S., and Medicare has spent tens of millions of dollars on bonuses and rewards for hospitals to improve. However, little is known about whether pay-for-performance (P4P) actually improves patient outcomes over the long term. A new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) finds no evidence that the largest hospital-based P4P program in the U.S. improved 30-day mortality rates, a measure of whether patients survive their hospitalization.Given that the Affordable Care Act calls for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to expand pay-for-performance to nearly all hospitals in 2012, the findings call into question whether this payment approach will have a beneficial effect on patient care.The study appears online March 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine.“These results suggest that the way we have currently conceived of pay-for-performance is unlikely to have any meaningful impact on patient outcomes,” said Ashish Jha, associate professor of health policy and management at HSPH and lead author of the study.The researchers, including senior author Arnold Epstein, professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at HSPH, analyzed data provided by 252 hospitals participating in Medicare’s Premier Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration program. They examined 30-day mortality rates for more than 6 million patients with acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, pneumonia, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery between 2004 and 2009. Non-Premier hospitals — those not part of Medicare’s pay-for-performance program — were used as a control group.The results showed that there was no impact on patient outcomes for hospitals in the Premier pay-for-performance program compared with non-Premier hospitals. In addition, no difference was found in outcomes even for conditions in which mortality rates were explicitly incentivized — acute myocardial infarction and coronary bypass graft surgery. Even among poor-performing hospitals, which have the most to gain by improving quality of care, improvements were comparable to poor-performing non-Premier hospitals.“Our findings suggest that both the size of the incentives and the targets matter. In the Premier demonstration, the incentives were small and patient outcomes were not the major focus. It is not surprising, in retrospect, that this program failed to improve patient care,” said Epstein.“We need to better align financial incentives with delivery of high-quality care,” said Jha. “This study suggests that in order to improve patient care, we are going to have to work a lot harder to identify and implement an incentive program that works.”The study was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.last_img read more


Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_img PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Listen: Polyrhythms “To see a Muñequitos show is priceless,” said Terry, who grew up seeing the 65-year-old group perform. “The work that they’re doing is very important for the younger generation because it continues the oral tradition of passing information from the older generation to the younger. It’s the first time my students are experiencing a real rumba, expressed with authenticity. I can teach this in classes, but it’s different to see. It inspires my band to look back into their own culture and use that inspiration to move things forward.”That kind of personal connection struck John Miller, a junior studying statistics, when he stepped off the tour bus the next day in Güines. The saxophone player, who grew up in Westlake, Calif., noticed among the crumbling buildings and stray animals in the town square children playing in a bright pink bouncy house and riding plastic toy cars.“That scene is very familiar to me. It looks exactly like the parks near my grandparents’ house. My mom’s family is Mexican, and they live in Chino, a very Mexican part of California. Everyone gathers in the parks for celebrations and get-togethers,” he said.,* * *In deciding to visit Güines, Terry said he wanted his students to see how a poor town used its musical roots to keep local children “out of trouble and get them into the community.”“Tata Güines was an incredible force to reckon with, venerated around the world. This isn’t a modern museum, or a beautiful part of Cuba,” he said. “But here is where they’re using art to empower the kids.” Visiting the museum where percussionist and composer Güines grew up, band members listened to the Cuban tour guide recount his modest roots. The son of a laundress, he banged out his first beats on the bottom of his mother’s wash bin. “They were very humble people,” she said, before leading the Harvard band into the courtyard for a performance. “The king of the drums was born.”As local drummers hit the sacred bata drums, dancers colorfully dressed to represent their deities and orishas — minor gods — circled the courtyard. After the performance, several students were invited to learn the rhythmic patterns. “Having the village elder come up and introduce it and demonstrate it, that was the definition of an educational moment.” — Jared Perlo Listen: Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde Music scholarship framed each day’s activities; the band members passed traditional Havana tourist sites such as Revolution Square and the Capitol Building with only a glance. Instead, Terry took students such as 19-year-old Jared Perlo, who plays trombone, to hear performances from the likes of Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde in Matanzas, the birthplaces of the music and dance traditions rumba and danzón, respectively. “This was really a week of learning in an environment where these musical traditions were actually born,” said Perlo, the band’s tour manager, who organized the trip along with Terry. “Being able to learn in places with the masters is an experience that I don’t think anything else I will ever do in the jazz scene will ever compare to.”The tour began in Matanzas, a fishing town on the northern shore that is home to some of the country’s biggest musical groups. On the way, the young musicians visited Castillo de San Severino, a military fortress built in 1735 and rebuilt years later as an entry point for slaves. Inside is the National Museum of the Slave Route, where students viewed the displays of African drums (Yuka, Bembé, Arará, Makuta) and mannequins representing various gods (Ogun, the Yoruba god of war and ironworkers; Ochossi, god of hunters and justice).“It’s important to come here and see how these traditions have survived, and have been kept, and the different ways they have evolved and mixed with other cultures,” said Terry.,* * *At the newly restored José White Concert Hall, the jazz band sat up front for a performance by Orquesta Típica Miguel Failde. Named for the bandleader who originated danzón in 1879, the dance combines European and African rhythms with elegant footwork. Failde’s great-great-grandson Ethiel, a flutist, led his band of musicians, ages 18 to 37, while an elderly couple — impeccably dressed, the woman holding a fan — strolled across the stage and began to move.Orquesta Típica performed several dynamic pieces, including the popular “Almendra” and “Daulema,” which was composed by Terry and trumpeter Jesús Alemañy. Then Failde invited the students to join the musicians on stage. Junior Brian Rolincik, who plays trombone, was among the first to join the “adrenaline-filled moment.” “Music is such a universal language, both in terms of the notation and the feelings you get from it, and in the camaraderie it creates among people of diverse cultures.” — Brian Rolincik PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen In a music classroom, conservatory students played for the band, and listened as Harvard students took their turn playing at the front of the classroom. With Terry and Yero translating, the Cuban teens asked how Harvard students played so well even though most of them concentrate in other disciplines.“Here your life revolves around your music,” said Yero, explaining that Cuban children begin their singular path to musicianship at ages 7 or 8.Reflecting on the La Ena exchange, baritone saxophonist Diana Gerberich, who grew up in Wilbraham, Mass., and had never been abroad before, was fascinated by the difference between how the two cultures “learn and interpret their music.”“The Cuban music tradition uses  polyrhythms, which American musicians are less familiar with. Several of the Cuban musicians we worked with tried to teach us polyrhythms, and it was very difficult at first. The Cuban musicians seem so comfortable with it, though. It’s interesting to reflect on what we understand versus what other people understand,” she said. * * *,After a week of engaging with students and performers, the jazz band took the stage at Casa de las Americas for a community concert. The Jam Session concert featured many of Terry’s friends, illustrious Cuban musicians including composer Bobby Carcassés, chekeré player (and Terry’s father) Don Pancho Terry, trumpeter Julito Padrón, and bass player Gastón Joya. Wearing light-blue guayaberas, the band performed a range of pieces to a full house for nearly two hours, including George Cables’ “Dark Side, Light Side” and “Moten Swing,” Cuban composer Joaquín Betancourt’s “Manteca,” and Carcassés’ piece “Blues Guaguancó.” “It was cool to be so welcomed and to just feel deeply entrenched in this Cuban tradition of danzón. Music is such a universal language, both in terms of the notation and the feelings you get from it, and in the camaraderie it creates among people of diverse cultures,” said the 21-year-old, who is studying linguistics. “To start to not only learn on an intellectual level the difference between our and Cuban culture, but to feel in the daily routines here what human experience comes down to — how you interact, how you speak — all of those habits comprise the culture. To try to feel those and to try and emulate those is a lot I can take away.”,There was more to absorb at an afternoon performance by Los Muñequitos de Matanzas. Trading the wood-paneled concert hall for a modest, second-story room with a tin roof, the students sat on the red-painted cement floor to watch the legendary rumba group. Dancers honoring traditions brought to Cuba by African slaves spun around the room in red, blue, and gold costumes while multiple percussionists drummed.“What’s so impressive is that the Cubans have internalized rhythms typical of Afro-Cuban jazz that don’t come as easily to us. Conversely, American students tend to feel comfortable in swing time. It’s striking to me that it’s [Yoruba] music that predates everything we study,” said guitarist Evan Vietorisz, whose Cuban grandmother immigrated to the United States in 1946. “She never shared anything with our family about her heritage because she sought to assimilate. It’s cool to be visiting Cuba and experiencing the culture that … hasn’t been part of my upbringing.” “It’s the first time my students are experiencing a real rumba, expressed with authenticity. I can teach this in classes, but it’s different to see.” — Yosvany Terry Listen: Clave HAVANA — It isn’t easy to get to Güines. Though the town once contained Cuba’s leading sugar plantation slave enclave and its earliest railway, Güines (pronounced Gwin-es) isn’t listed on TripAdvisor or in any major travel guide. When the Harvard Jazz Bands traveled there recently as part of a musical tour of the island, security wouldn’t let their bus cross the small bridge into town, forcing it to find another route.Once inside the town, though, the lessons from its rich musical past — and the visions of its hopes for the future — crystallized in a tiny courtyard covered in torn colored fabrics symbolizing the Cuban flag. The band members, under the guidance of Director Yosvany Terry, a native of Cuba, toured the historic one-room museum home of Tata Güines, one of the country’s top percussionists, and watched an Afro-Cuban performance of percussion, dance, and chanting by the National Folkloric Company of Cuba.,Listen: National Folkloric Company of Cuba PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreencenter_img PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Appreciating Cuban music, its vast diversity, and how deeply it is sewn into the social and political fabric of the country was at the heart of the Harvard band’s trip. The fast-paced, eight-day musical adventure in early June marked the group’s first tour in 25 years, and Terry, a saxophonist and chekeré player who joined the faculty in 2015, organized an itinerary not only to showcase Cuba’s musical vibrancy, but also to illuminate recent efforts to rescue and preserve age-old traditions.“This is the stuff that makes me tick. Coming from a percussion background, I’ve learned so much from watching them,” said Ethan Kripke, a sophomore who plays drums. “How they learn and internalize rhythm is just fundamentally different than in the United States. The clave is a fundamental rhythmic pulse that everything else — the percussion, the singing, the dancing — relates back to. It’s very precise but, if performed correctly, it gives the music a certain elasticity.” “The clave is a fundamental rhythmic pulse that everything else — the percussion, the singing, the dancing — relates back to.” — Ethan Kripke “Having the village elder come up and introduce it and demonstrate it, that was the definition of an educational moment,” said Perlo.Perlo’s drive to make the trip happen was prompted, in part, by his father’s experience. Don Perlo ’83 played in the Harvard band during his time at the College, and toured with the group in the Dominican Republic 26 years ago.“Ever since meeting Yosvany, I knew there was something special he brought to rehearsals and campus. We’d hang around after rehearsal, and he’d talk about how he was influenced by his upbringing in Cuba. Knowing his creative spirit and willingness to try new things, well, here we are,” said Perlo. Home base during the tour was a hostel called Casa Vera in the Vedado neighborhood of Havana. The band was composed of 13 undergraduates and three other musicians, including newly graduated Sara Politz, who will teach ethnomusicology this fall at Williams College; Cuban trumpeter Yaure Muniz; and alumnus (and professional trumpeter) Bob Merrill. The week would culminate with an official concert by the band at Casa de las Américas in Havana, preceded by visits to several conservatories to work with local music students.,* * *On the bus rides to the schools, the Harvard students heard about Cuba’s history from tour guide Manny Calvo, who explained the importance of poet José Martí, a national hero, and passed around his own ration book, listing the quantities and types of food his family was eligible to receive every month. Cary Garcia Yero, a Ph.D. student at Harvard studying Cuba’s history, added context to the conversation about Fidel Castro’s revolution and the nation’s racial dynamics, and shared a Harvard connection: During a U.S. occupation of the island in 1900, 1,300 Cuban teachers trained in Cambridge before returning home.“Seeing a country like Cuba is fascinating because my mom is from the former Soviet Union,” which was a communist state as Cuba is, said Jake Tilton, a junior tenor saxophonist who is concentrating in music and government. “Cuba is sort of a time capsule into the age that my mother lived in. It’s interesting to see the system she lived under, and how those political and social systems work.”,Music was never far from the conversation, and even small moments on the bus felt momentous for the students. On one ride, Terry queued up Herbie Hancock’s “Watermelon Man,” asking: “Everybody got a flute?” The band members hummed and tapped imaginary instruments in unison to the music coming from the speaker.“That might have been the coolest five minutes I’ve spent on a bus,” said saxophonist Richard M. Feder, a junior from Long Island studying astrophysics.Terry’s hopes for the trip were twofold: to expose the students to “one of the most sophisticated cultural bastions of the Americas” and to break the barrier between professor and student in a more experiential setting.“I wanted them to experience the intellect and visual culture from the eyes of a Cuban citizen,” he said. “And it was intentional to take them out of what would be the obvious tourist instinct.”,* * *Nowhere was the challenge to conventional American musical sensibilities felt more acutely than in visits to three conservatories: Guillermo Tomás, Amadeo Roldán, and the National Schools for the Arts (La Ena). At each, the Harvard band donated a musical instrument and music stands as part of the Horns to Havana program. At Amadeo Roldán in Centro Havana, piano student Rodrigo Garcia led his band in a performance, then listened to the Harvard group perform.“Many Cubans have looked for the way to get into the world of American music that, to us, is also a very rich culture worth studying,” Garcia said. “All exchanges that we have with American musicians are a gift for us. And they are also a way for us to communicate, a way to unite cultures, a way to create a bridge between these two countries that are so close but that have been separated for so long for reasons that are not valid to us.”It was at La Ena, where Terry studied in 1990, that the jazz band spent an afternoon workshopping with two bands. Conceived on a former country club golf course by Castro in 1961, the campus is made up of Catalan-vaulted buildings, which house schools of dance, dramatic arts, music, and plastic arts. On a walk around the sprawling campus, the band watched dancers rehearse, then visited a waterlogged ballet performance space. Built but never used after Alicia Alonso, one of Cuba’s prima ballerinas, refused to dance there, the terra cotta building sits in disrepair, with the only sound coming from bats flying inside the domed roof.,“The Cuban music tradition uses  polyrhythms, which American musicians are less familiar with. Several of the Cuban musicians we worked with tried to teach us polyrhythms, and it was very difficult at first.” — Diana Gerberich Instructor Yosvany Terry returns home, where his musical destiny was formed Listen: Bata drums Related Kripke, the drummer, played alongside acclaimed percussionist Yaroldy Abreu, and was still star-struck afterward. “This past week I was constantly exposed to new rhythmic ideas, and different interpretations of the ones I knew. I was expecting this to be the case because of Cuba’s rich West African musical tradition. In the culminating concert, I tried to put all of my new knowledge to use. I incorporated ideas into my playing tonight that only a week ago I wouldn’t have considered. And Yaroldy looking over to me while letting out a joyous scream after I played some particularly Cuban-inspired fill was enough to know that I had succeeded.” After the concert, the band shared a late-night dinner with the luminaries, and Perlo declaring the week “mind-blowing.”“This will be my favorite memory of Harvard. On a music and jazz level, I’ve learned more in seven days than in a couple of years in a classroom,” he said.“I haven’t done many things in my life that have ended in an incredibly beautiful experience shared by 20 other people who will remember it for decades to come. It sounds like an overstatement, but I don’t think it will be.”Next week: A profile on music professor, jazz band director, and Cuban native Yosvany Terry and his journey home. Harvard jazz leader, amid his Cuban roots PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Listen: Los Muñequitos de Matanzaslast_img read more


Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_img See also: The United Nations’ World Health Organization (WHO) and Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) are seeking more information from China about its reported use of amantadine in poultry, according to reports today by the Associated Press (AP) and Agence France-Presse (AFP). The Washington Post reported on Jun 18 that Chinese farmers, with the knowledge and support of government officials, used amantadine on chickens as long ago as the late 1990s. The report called the drug use a violation of international livestock guidelines. Jun 20, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – International health agencies are questioning China about a report that the country has used a human antiviral drug in poultry for years, thereby causing the H5N1 influenza virus to become resistant to the drug. The FAO’s Beijing office was seeking information from China’s agriculture ministry, AFP reported today. Roy Wadia, a WHO spokesman in Beijing, said it’s premature to blame China for spurring resistance to amantadine, AFP reported. The drug dates back to 1976, and human resistance has been a problem. But Wadia added that China’s use might have hastened the development of resistance. Bui Quang Anh, animal health director in Vietnam’s agriculture ministry, called for “very high vigilance” against avian flu and said that some provinces were not taking the problem seriously, AFP reported. But he said there were no plans for mass poultry vaccinations. However, the story said researchers in Hong Kong found outbreaks in China in 1997, 2001, and 2003. News Editor Robert Roos contributed to this article. Amantadine and rimantadine make up an older class of antiviral medications used to reduce the impact of influenza. Some nations have made stockpiling amantadine part of their flu pandemic preparedness plans. A newer and more costly class of antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir), is also used against flu. According to the Post, pharmaceutical executives in China confirmed that amantadine had been used since the late 1990s to treat or prevent avian flu in chickens. China first reported an outbreak of avian flu to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) on Feb 2, 2004, according to the OIE listing of H5N1 outbreaks. Researchers found last year that the strain of H5N1 found in Vietnam and Thailand had become resistant to amantadine. The Post story quoted health experts outside China as saying they had suspected the link between resistance and use in poultry. The story said international researchers now believe the Chinese use of the drug is to blame. Halvorson emphasized that flu outbreaks in poultry must be addressed on a country-by-country basis because of national laws. He said the international community needs to reach out to those countries willing to get help. Halvorson could have predicted that resistance would arise if the drug were used in poultry. He worked on research with amantadine in turkeys about 20 years ago. “We found that resistance occurred quite quickly,” he said. Dave Halvorson, DVM, a veterinarian in avian health at the University of Minnesota in S. Paul, registered little surprise at the news today.center_img News out of Vietnam today served to underscore his point. Veterinary officials there announced that another 6,000 chickens were infected with H5N1, the first outbreak there in 2 months, according to AFP. The outbreak occurred in the southern province of Ben Tre, southwest of Ho Chi Minh City, the story said. Chinese authorities denied the report. OIE avian flu reportshttp://www.oie.int/downld/AVIAN%20INFLUENZA/A_AI-Asia.htm Amantadine targets the “M” protein of flu viruses, explained Osterholm, who is director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of this Web site. If a pandemic virus arose through the combination, or reassortment, of the H5N1 avian virus with a human flu virus, the M gene would come from the human virus, he said. As a result, “That [new virus] should still be relatively susceptible to amantadine,” he said. “These other countries are just overwhelmed,” he said. “Just finding avian flu is a big enough problem, let alone getting rid of it.” The government has never allowed farmers to use amantadine, said Xu Shixin, director of the agriculture ministry’s veterinary bureau, as quoted today in the newspaper China Daily. He added that the government will take action soon to curb illicit use. He also said avian flu in China was under control. If the H5N1 virus gives rise to a pandemic strain of flu, the resistance to amantadine might not necessarily carry through to the new strain, according to infectious disease expert Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH. It would depend on the process that produced the pandemic strain. “People who thought about it must have figured out they were using amantadine in poultry,” he said. “The resistance is not new information.” However, “Either way it’s bad,” because even if a pandemic virus is susceptible to amantadine, the drug will be in short supply, he added. The impact of the amantadine treatment isn’t clear. One FAO official quoted by AFP said it’s important to find out whether China had found a safe way to deliver the drug to animals, but warned that underdosing causes resistance. Use of amantadine in livestock is banned in the United States and other countries, the newspaper reported. Yet veterinarians explained to Chinese farmers how to use the drug and even supplied it, the story said. However, if the H5N1 virus adapted to humans gradually through a series of mutations, rather than through reassortment, it could remain resistant to amantadine. “If it continues to mutate, and we see a pandemic strain arise through slow human adaptation, that could mean amantadine is all but done,” Osterholm said. “Amantadine is widely used in the entire country,” the Post quoted Zhang Libin, head of the veterinary medicine division of Northeast General Pharmaceutical Factory in Shenyang, as saying. “Many pharmaceutical factories around China produce amantadine, and farmers can buy it easily in veterinary medicine stores.”last_img read more


Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_imgJac-Cen-Del Varsity Track traveled to South Decatur in Westport  on Tuesday (4-22) for a 4 way meet.Other teams include Oldenburg Academy and Trinity Lutheran.Final scores : Ladies-Oldenburg 70, Trinity Lutheran 68.5, Jac-Cen-Del48 and South Decatur 41.5Mens-South Decatur 94, Oldenburg 63, Trinity Lutheran 38 and Jac-Cen-Del 29Highlights:Eli Wagner 3rd 100D- :12.24, 2nd-400D :57.04, 3rd 200D – :25.7, 1stLongJump- 18’7″Chris Kissel 4th 800M- 2:27, 5th 3200M-12:53,Tyler Johnson 1st Shot 41’10”, 2nd Disc 127’10”Ladies:Kelsey Bowling 1st 100H-16.71, 2nd 300H- :57.5,1st LongJump -14’7″,Abby Wagner 4th 100D- :14.95,Jenna Hughes 3rd 1600M- 6:17, 3rd 800M-2:49. 2nd HighJump-4’6″,Kayla Bowling 4th 400D- 1:14.4,Andrea Smith 4th 3200M-14:33Sasha Wagner 4th HighJump-4’4″Rosie Newhart 1st Shot- 30’10”, 2nd Disc – 93’10”Submitted by JCD Coach Larry Hammond.last_img read more


Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_img Published on February 22, 2012 at 12:00 pm The Carrier Dome went silent as C.J. Fair clutched his left knee. The sophomore forward had just crumbled to the court without any contact and rolled around grimacing in pain.But as quickly as it happened, the pain subsided, and Fair walked off under his own power to the pleasure of Syracuse fans.‘The court was wet because someone fell,’ he said. ‘It wasn’t a dead ball, so they couldn’t mop it up. I jumped up, and I fell weird. But I’m good.’The scare came at the 8:27 mark of the first half, but even though Orange trainer Brad Pike came out to tend to Fair, the sophomore was back on the court less than a minute later. He came out of halftime with a white sleeve on his knee but said the injury didn’t affect him during the game. He finished with 13 points, six rebounds, five steals and three assists as No. 2 SU (28-1, 15-1 Big East) knocked off South Florida (17-11, 10-5 Big East) 56-48 Wednesday.It was Fair’s fourth straight game scoring in double figures as the sophomore’s offensive game continues to develop.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘At this point in the year with any of the guards, I know how to feed off of them and try to get to open spots where I can be available to them to pass to me,’ he said.Fair scored seven of SU’s first nine points against the Bulls before suffering the minor injury.He didn’t score after the injury in the first half, but in the second, he created more for himself. He got to the line early on after hauling in an offensive rebound. The forward’s next bucket came on a hard baseline drive, and he later sealed the Orange win with two free throws late in the game.After the game, Fair said the knee wasn’t an issue and would be fine. He also added that the key to his offensive success was simple.‘Just being aggressive at all times,’ he said. ‘And that’s not just trying to score but just attack mode. Keep the defense honest and make myself available.’USF guard Collins succeeds scoring insideTime and again, Anthony Collins drove in among the trees. Unwavering, the 6-foot-1, 180-pound South Florida point guard attacked the middle of the Syracuse defense.Time and again, he scored.Collins went 5-for-5 in the paint Wednesday night against the Orange, lofting teardrop after teardrop up and over SU center Fab Melo and watching them fall softly through the basket. Though the Bulls fell 56-48 to Syracuse on Wednesday night, Collins finished with 12 points and 10 assists to lead USF.‘He’s good. He’s a really good player. I was very impressed with him,’ SU head coach Jim Boeheim said. ‘He made every shot. They were all tough shots over people. The only shot he missed was a 3 he had to force a little bit at the end of the game.’Collins never looked for his shot as the first option offensively for South Florida, but when lanes opened up he took them. By slicing into the middle of the 2-3 zone, he left Melo with a choice. The 7-foot center could step up and try to impede Collins’ path, or he could stay back.‘If I come up, he’s going to pass to the other guy down low. It’s tough,’ Melo said. ‘I don’t know what to do sometimes. I just go up and he passes down. Then it would be my fault. It’s hard.’Melo stayed back Wednesday, as he said he’s supposed to, and Collins made Syracuse pay. His ability to make contested shots late in the shot clock bailed out South Florida five times.‘He has a knack of getting in there and freezing you,’ USF head coach Stan Heath said. ‘And if you want to jump at it, he’ll find a way to pass it, too. So it’s pick your poison once you get in there. ‘No comment from BoeheimBefore the reporter could even finish the question, Boeheim made it clear he wouldn’t discuss the defamation case he currently faces.Bobby Davis and Mike Lang filed a lawsuit against Boeheim claiming he defamed them by calling them liars after they claimed they were molested by former SU assistant coach Bernie Fine.Judge Brian DeJoseph ruled Wednesday that the case would be heard in Onondaga County rather than in New York City. When a reporter asked if he could comment on the change of venue, Boeheim cut him off with one word: ‘No.’[email protected]@syr.edu Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more


Tag: 广州学生新茶

first_img Published on November 16, 2016 at 2:48 am Contact Connor: [email protected] | @connorgrossman There was no drama on Tuesday night in the Carrier Dome. No. 18 Syracuse (2-0) coasted past Holy Cross (0-2) by 44 points, winning 90-46. SU showcased its full offensive capabilities, lifted primarily by Andrew White, Tyler Lydon, Tyler Roberson and even some help on the boards.Here’s three things we learned from the Orange’s blowout.This is what Syracuse’s offense can look like with Lydon and White providing the fuelEntering this season, it seemed apparent that the lifeblood of SU’s offense would primarily course through White and Lydon. The scoreboard on Tuesday reflected that statement, it just took a game for it to come to fruition. White dropped in a team-high 19 points, while Lydon trailed closely with 17. All together, they accounted for 40 percent of the team’s production.A huge chunk of White’s point total was rooted in a 5-for-10 performance from 3. He neutralized a pair of early 3s from the Crusaders in the first half with two of his own. Lydon even broke out of his 3-point drought, making his first two on the season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“When you make (3s), it’s an easy game,” head coach Jim Boeheim said. “When you don’t, it’s a hard game.“We’re going to have those games, we’re going to have those nights and we’re going to have to will our way through them.”Tuesday was not one of those nights. Tuesday was the first time Lydon and White both reached double-digits point totals, and they gave the Crusaders’ defense an impossible dilemma. Lydon scored almost all of his points in the paint while White reigned from deep. The visitors never quite figured it out.Roberson is hitting jumpers, even if Boeheim’s not buying itPerhaps one of the biggest surprises through a pair of exhibitions and regular-season games is the offensive output from Roberson. The 6-foot-8 forward is averaging over 13 points per game, including the two preseason matchups. He pitched in 12 points against Holy Cross, one game removed from a team-high 18 points against Colgate.Most of his tallies against the Raiders came at the rim, but he successfully flashed his mid-range jumper a few times in the season opener, and again on Tuesday. The senior gave the Orange the lead for good with his first shot, one he hit less than three minutes into the game.He followed that a few minutes later with another jumper, this one as Jehyve Floyd was closing on him hastily.“They were letting (Roberson) shoot it,” Boeheim said, “and that’s your worst nightmare. When you’re let a guy shoot and he makes them.”It’s not as if Roberson is a completely transformed offensive player, he’s just fit well into the lineups SU has run out. His shots are falling more often than they’re not, even if that’s not the case in practice.“We keep statistics in practice,” Boeheim said, “(Roberson’s shooting) below 30 (percent). Facts are facts. Don’t try to go to what you hope is there or what you think is there. Try to go by the facts. I know that’s difficult.”Syracuse showed life on the offensive glassWith Lydon mired in a shooting slump prior to Tuesday’s game, Boeheim suggested last week that the sophomore needed to operate more around the basket. Not only to allow Lydon more high-percentage shots, but to spark himself with second- or third-chance points.That’s exactly how Lydon got going on Tuesday, putting back a third-chance layup that foreshadowed a breakout night. He was one of four Orange players with multiple offensive boards, and he paced SU with five.The Crusaders set up in a zone defense, and that left plenty of room on the interior for Syracuse to infiltrate.  In the first eight minutes alone, the Orange had two offensive possessions with two offensive rebounds. Both ended in Lydon layups.“We did a good job of exploiting (open space),” Roberson said. “We have to do it in the future when teams try to play this kind of defense on us.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more