Month: June 2021

Month: June 2021

first_imgSmile, will you? It’s not a wooden spoon decider ’til Ireland have been faced…Follow Al Dymock on Twitter @AlanDymock LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ross Rennie got Man of the Match, and although he was fighting against a formidable trio of Thierry Dusautoir, Imanol Harinordoquy and Julien Bonnaire in the closing minutes he was showing up well in the close quarter combat.Nick De Luca made amends for previous poor performances when he came on and Graeme Morrison and Sean Lamont was his usual solid self, while Ross Ford led the team brilliantly, before running himself into the ground.With such tenacious adherence to running round the corner, a dedication to offloading at will and a desire to run with guile in the opposition’s half it is small wonder that things are, very, very slowly, looking a little better.Médard on his way to scoring the winning tryOf course Scotland are finishing off very few of all of their line breaks and they kicked poorly, but they were pretty close to France. They were challenging them in the lineout. France let Ford, Blair and Hogg make breaks. France did not just turn up and win. They had to work for it and they had to use tailored tactics to do so.Richie Gray was targeted in the loose. Rougerie was used to draw fire so Fofana could have quick ball. Malzieu was given a one on one with Lee Jones and Lionel Beauxis, William Servat and Lionel Nallet were brought on to kill off the game.Yes France did what they had do to win this game and it was possible because they are simply that bit better than Scotland. However, there should be no striving to lay blame at people’s feet. The tactics worked as well as they could, before France sapped all energy out of the Scots, and Hogg and Jones got tries. not for featured Ross Rennie was made RBS Man of the MatchBy Al DymockAT post-match press conferences, stats sheets are handed out by busy looking officials. You get the certified breakdown of what happened during the game and you can pick over where and why things didn’t go to plan.After Scotland lost 17-23 against France, I crumpled the sheet up and threw it away.The thing is that if you were to look at the sheet you would see more of the same. Scotland dominated possession and time on the ball, but did not score more points than their opponents. By the same token, though, the sheet does not tell you everything.For example, Scotland officially lost no balls against the head, but they gave away numerous penalties and free kicks in the scrum. They were outmuscled and out-thought in that department, particularly in the last fifteen minutes of the game when the forwards had been run to a standstill. In fact, the same could be said of the rucks. Scotland had some joy at the breakdown, but as it got nearer to the final whistle France did what they had to do to win.This is the point. Forget stats. Forget bluster. Forget the swirling rumours about Andy Robinson’s future and his Six Nations record. In this one game Scotland played very well, but lost to a better team.After the game journalists were looking for headlines. As one of them said to me “life is shades of grey, but the fans and ‘papers want black and white”. Robinson’s side did magnificently well and entertained a lively crowd but they lost and few of the Scots can be blamed for that.Hogg scores on his debutHogg again showed why he is so highly regarded in Scotland, and soon beyond our borders. He scored a try by scorching up Julien Malzieu’s wing and every time he caught the ball the crowd took to their feet and held their breath. He was exciting, unpredictable and a reason to be cheerful.last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img Up for the challenge: Ollie Phillips (left) and Tim Stimpson. Former Test stars Tim Stimpson and Ollie Phillips have set a new Guinness World Record for playing the northernmost rugby match in history, at the Magnetic North Pole – and raised a stack of money for charity in the process. The extraordinary feat was accomplished as part of the Wooden Spoon Arctic Challenge, which saw the intrepid group trek more than 60 miles over the ice in temperatures as low as minus 30 degrees C, then set up rugby posts, mark out a pitch perimeter and play a match.Team Tim beat Team Ollie 17-14, while another former England player Lee Mears was the referee. Winning skipper Tim Stimpson said: “Having played a lot of rugby up in Newcastle I’ve played in some chilly conditions but this was another level altogether!”Ex England Sevens captain Ollie Phillips added; “I can’t quite believe that we’ve done it, it’s an amazing feeling. The Arctic is an incredible yet dangerous place and we needed to be on the top of our game to make sure we didn’t make any mistakes during the trek, as one lapse in concentration could have been catastrophic.” Watch the Wooden Spoon Arctic Challenge video here. http://youtu.be/X4mvrp5Tehkcenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Artic Challenge was created with the aim of raising £300,000 for Wooden Spoon, the children’s charity of rugby, which helps disadvantaged and disabled children across the UK and Ireland. To donate, text code ARCT01 for £2, £5 or £10 to 70070.last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img TAGS: Highlight Jack Nowell crossed twice as the 2017 Lions secured their first midweek win, seeing off the Chiefs with ease in Hamilton.They scored four tries in all – Jared Payne also touching down and a penalty try awarded after a maul was collapsed close to the line – and dominated at the set-piece too. It was the first time the midweek team has built a lead and maintained it, a significant step forward and important in maintaining momentum for the first Test.The Chiefs were kept scoreless in the second half and offered little in attack, perhaps understandable given the number of players they had unavailable.For all the talk of the six new Lions call-ups on the bench, just Allan Dell made it onto the pitch, and only then because Joe Marler was sin-binned early in the first half. Warren Gatland stuck to his plan to only use those recent additions if it was absolutely necessary.All in all, it was a good night for the Lions.Clean through: Jared Payne runs in his second-half try against the Chiefs. Photo: Getty ImagesWhich Lions caught the eye?The back three – It’s fair to say that many of the back-three contingent in this tour party had underperformed in the previous games, but the trio chosen against the Chiefs sparked into life in Hamilton. Jack Nowell crossed for two tries and popped up in the middle of the park regularly. Elliot Daly was lively on his wing and his substitution on the 60-minute mark could be an indication that he will be involved in the first Test, even if he did return to the action for the closing minutes when Jared Payne went for an HIA. Liam Williams made several trademark jinky runs and set up Payne’s second-half try.Courtney Lawes – He stole a lineout inside his own 22 in the opening minutes, put in an important tap tackle on Toni Pulu after ten minutes and dived on a loose ball to give the Lions a counter-attacking opportunity around the half-hour mark. Those were just three of the lock’s contributions in the opening 40 minutes as he produced another impressive display. He suffered a head injury for the second time in a week, going off after 50 minutes for an HIA, and when he returned he probably didn’t have the same impact. It has to be said that all the second-rows in the Lions squad have performed well on this tour and it will interesting to see who earns that bench spot for the first Test behind expected starters George Kruis and Maro Itoje.Full stretch: Courtney Lawes wins a lineout against the Chiefs. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s hotAtmosphere – It was a full house of 29,974 at Waikato Stadium, more fans crammed in than normal with additional seating added, and despite being enclosed in a glass media box, you could sense the noise and colour in the ground. Lions fans have definitely grown in number and the home fans were ringing their cowbells loudly. A cracking atmosphere in Hamilton.Adventurous spirit – The Lions have been criticised in these parts for their limited game plan but they showed a more attack-minded streak here – the dry conditions no doubt playing a part. Yes, their set-piece was sill dominant, but they also showed a willingness to run the ball. This was personified by Jack Nowell’s second try, when the Lions launched a counter-attack from their own 22, spread the ball wide to Elliot Daly, who broke down the wing before passing the ball back inside, where it was recycled, fed out to Nowell, who picked a good angle to get over the line. Dive man: Jack Nowell scores the game’s opening try. Photo: Getty Images FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERERef humour – Frenchman Jerome Garces took control of this match and had those with ref links chuckling midway through the first half. Speaking to Cheifs scrum-half Finlay Christie, he said: “You speak too much. If you want to play quick don’t speak to me.” Then in the second half when Joe Marler had his head strapped, the prop joked to Garces: “How do I look?” And the official raised a smile. GSOH.Official humour: Jerome Garces was in good form during the Chiefs v Lions game. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s notIll-discipline – It’s been the common theme of these midweek Lions performances. After 20 minutes there was a shout of “discipline” from one of the tourists but even at that point they had a man in the bin – Joe Marler yellow-carded for a needless no-arms tackle. By half-time they had already conceded more penalties than in the entire match against the Maori All Blacks (six compared to four). Things improved in the second half, but they make things difficult for themselves with their own mistakes and infringements.Seeing yellow: Joe Marler in the sin-bin early on at Waikato Stadium. Photo: Getty ImagesMitch Brown – In a similar vein, Chiefs back-row Mitch Brown was almost a one-man penalty machine, being pinged a handful of times before getting sin-binned for collapsing a maul – an offence that resulted in a penalty try for the Lions. Maybe a little eager to make an impression.Chiefs: Shaun Stevenson; Toni Pulu (Chase Tiatia 12), Tim Nanai-Williams, Johnny Fa’auli, Solomon Alaimalo (Luteru Laulala 66); Stephen Donald (capt), Finlay Christie; Siegfried Fisiihoi (Aidan Ross 65), Liam Polwart (Hika Elliot 60), Nepo Laulala (Atu Moli 65), Dominic Bird, Michael Allardice (Mitch Karpik 65), Mitch Brown, Lachlan Boshier, Tom Sanders (Liam Messam 55).Pens: Donald 2.Yellow card: Brown (55min).In the running: Elliot Daly looks to have moved into Test contention with his display. Photo: Getty ImagesLions: Liam Williams; Jack Nowell, Jared Payne (Daly 77), Robbie Henshaw, Elliot Daly (Tommy Seymour 60); Dan Biggar, Greig Laidlaw; Joe Marler, Rory Best (capt), Dan Cole, Iain Henderson, Courtney Lawes (Alun Wyn Jones 50-58), James Haskell (Allan Dell 14-24), Justin Tipuric, CJ Stander. The good and the bad of the British & Irish Lions’ game against the Chiefs Tries: Nowell 2, penalty (7pts), Payne. Cons: Biggar 3. Pens: Biggar 2.Yellow card: Marler (12min). LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Executive Council, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Executive Council challenged to engage in adaptive change Triennial draft budget begins with two reduced revenue alternatives Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA January 29, 2012 at 9:11 pm The piece I don’t hear here, is a commitment to some straight out evangelism, that is, helping people to believe in Jesus, period. Years ago in a diocese far far away…. I recall being in a conversation with a diocesan staffer about a new evangelism project we were thinking of getting underway. He pounded the table and said “not one cent for church preservation, we’re about urban mission!” …. to which I replied, “If you want to do some urban mission, you have to have some urban Christians.”Especially in a “post-Christian” era it strikes me that we need to work on helping people to “come to Jesus,” as a more key part of our mission… even as I know that it is not one of our great Episcopal skills. Perhaps this is a change we need to adapt to. Robert Ralston says: Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Executive Council January 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (2) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 27, 2012 Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 27, 2012 at 9:57 pm I totally agree. We all know the problem. You are not alone, the whole country is facing the same problem. For whatever reason, you have accepted a decline in membership, so face up to the consequences and move forward. Poor managemnt will not solve what lies ahead. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Len Freeman says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] Three Episcopal Church leaders challenged members of the church’s Executive Council Jan. 27 to engage in “adaptive change” in response to what they said are changing church and societal environments.That challenge began immediately as the members received two different budget scenarios developed by council’s Executive Committee upon which to begin formulating a draft 2013-2015 budget. One scenario calls for asking dioceses to contribute 19 percent of their income and the other calls for dioceses contributing 15 percent. The larger income would be $103.6 million and the 15 percent-asking budget would be reduced by approximately $13.5 million, according to Treasurer Kurt Barnes.In an emailed memo to Episcopal Church Center staff after the scenarios were presented to council, Chief Operating Officer Stacy Sauls noted that the 19-percent version plans on a $5.9 million decrease in income from the current triennium. The 15-percent version’s reduced revenue amounts to $19.3 million less than the current triennium.Both budget scenarios would require “personnel adjustments,” Del Glover, chair of council’s Finances for Mission committee, told his fellow council members. In the 19-percent scenario the potential adjustments could amount to the equivalent of eight full-time staff positions at most, while 36 full-time staff positions at most could be cut from the 15 percent scenario, according to the spreadsheets presented.Council must hand off a draft 2013-2015 budget to the church’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) by the close of its Jan. 27-29 meeting here at the conference center at the Maritime Institute.Program, Budget and Finance meets at the Maritime Institute Jan. 30-Feb. 2 to begin its work on the draft. It will eventually develop a triennial budget to propose to General Convention on July 10. Glover said that council might choose to give P&F two draft budgets, one he called a “preferred” version and another “alternative.”The 2013-2015 budget will not be final until General Convention approves it, a vote now scheduled for July 12. The budget takes effect January 1, 2013.During the opening session of council’s meeting, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson and Sauls all touched on the financial and demographic challenges facing the Episcopal Church, and predicted that the 2013-2015 budget will change between now and its adoption in July.“That budget will almost certainly emerge differently at General Convention from the way we give it to Program, Budget and Finance,” Jefferts Schori said during her opening remarks. “I think the process would have failed if that weren’t the case. General Convention is likely to alter it in some ways, perhaps radically, perhaps not. Our task is to do our work, to plant the seeds, let others water and expect that God will give the growth that’s needed to let the creative response to current realities emerge at General Convention.”Those “current realities” include such things as declining mainline denominational membership and financial struggles caused both by those membership declines and the current economy. As part of understanding that context, council also heard a 45-minute presentation by Kirk Hadaway, the church’s congregational research officer, and Matthew Price, Church Pension Group director of analytic research, on trends in declining attendance, membership and finances.“Our task as a church is not to let anxieties about these realities hurry us to some kind of premature resolution,” Jefferts Schori said, adding that “reflection and discernment in consultation is important to ensuring that all voices are included and heard, and I think encourages us to prevent rushing into a black-white, up-down, yes-no kind of answer. The adaptive change we’re engaged in is far more complex than that.”Jefferts Schori suggested that council needed to reflect on and consider changing how it exercises its oversight over people and programs in the church. Invoking the difference between pedagogy and andragogy, she said council had to consider the difference “between treating the people and systems of which we’re responsible as children to be raised or as adults to be in conversation with.”“We are in ministry with, not over,” she added.The presiding bishop said that too often the church has unintentionally kept some people and partner organizations “in dependent relationships by the way we have doled out resources.” She added that she was not talking just about money. “We have not offered enough of ourselves in terms of sharing people resources, skills, missionaries, finances to help people to grow up into the full stature of Christ.”Anderson in her opening remarks used the early church example of Lydia, Dorcas and Phoebe, whose feast day is Jan. 27, as examples of how to build the church during a time of rapid societal change.“We can have a budget that reflects our courage and commitment to follow in the footsteps of Lydia, Dorcas and Phoebe, who built up the church where they were with what they had,” she said.Anderson said Christians can’t stand by and watch change happen. “We are called upon to use the change, even create the change that we believe will bring about a reconciled world,” she said, adding that the draft 2013-2015 budget is “a golden opportunity … to create some badly needed change.”She suggested that council “try to discern God’s call for our future by looking for what’s right in front of us that … we’re missing” rather than “spend a lot of time mourning what’s past or trying to keep a patchwork of it sewn together.”“Just allocating more money for local mission and ministry isn’t enough, of course,” she warned. “We need to cultivate innovation, hone our skills at rapid prototyping, and look around for the people and places already supporting ministry that we’re in danger of missing.”Anderson suggested that the budget reduce the amount that it asks dioceses to send to the Church Center, study the best use of the Church Center building in New York “with an eye to freeing up for mission the $7.7 million that is earmarked for facilities cost and debt repayment during the next triennium,” expect that dioceses and their networks know best how to build up the church and support ministry, and “acknowledge that we also need to change our models of accountability and responsibility to be mutual and respectful of the entire people of God, not just those with ecclesial power.”“I don’t believe we need a transitional budget, one that takes baby steps but still holds on tight to the old structures and old ways of operating,” she said.Sauls, citing the movie “Moneyball,” said that baseball team manager Billy Beane’s guiding principle of “adapt or die” “pretty much sums up the challenge of the Episcopal Church, and all churches, at the beginning of a post-modern, and certainly post-Christian era face.”He said the Church Center staff has recently adopted its own guiding principle of “dream, create, adapt, act.”“I dream about a Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society staff that is true to its name,” Sauls told council, referring to the corporate name of the Episcopal Church. “And I dream about a Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society staff that is known throughout the church as creative, competent, and helpful, a staff all levels of our church want to be their resource, partners, and collaborator in engaging God’s mission to proclaim good news to the poor, release to the captives, recovery of sight to the blind, freedom to the oppressed, and the acceptable year of the Lord [Luke 4:18].”To do that, Sauls said, the staff needs the collaboration and support of Executive Council. “It wants to work with you. And it will be responsive to you, your ideas, and your concerns,” he said. “What I ask all of you, though, is that you treat the staff as your collaborators and partners, and work directly with us, at least first, and not take what’s on your mind instead to public forums and express your criticisms there, which unfortunately is not an isolated occurrence.”“When that happens it very much goes against the creativity of which we’re capable and which is precisely what the church needs from us. And I want to suggest that it is not a good way to carry out the fiduciary responsibilities of being a board, including those owed to the staff.”The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by provincial synods for six-year terms, plus the Presiding Bishop and the President of the House of Deputies.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed. Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Margaret Dempster, a Canadian from British Columbia, pins a white ribbon representing a commitment to stop violence against women on the Rt. Rev. Samuel Azariah, the moderator of the Church of Pakistan and bishop of the Diocese of Raiwind. Azariah is attending the Anglican Consultative Council meeting in Auckland as a member of the communion’s Standing Committee. Dempster is a member of the International Anglican Women’s Network (http://iawn.anglicancommunion.org/index.cfm) steering committee. The ribbons are from New Zealand’s White Ribbon campaign (http://whiteribbon.org.nz/), whose slogan asks “Are you man enough to stop violence against women?” ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service — Auckland, New Zealand] The Anglican Consultative Council on Oct. 31 (local time) agreed to have Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams and Anglican Communion Secretary General Kenneth Kearon direct a group to monitor the communion’s response to gender-base violence and other forms of abuse.The decision came on the fifth day of the ACC’s Oct. 27-Nov. 7 meeting here and followed a public forum on the issues the prior evening.At that forum in Holy Trinity Cathedral in Auckland, Williams said that “abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect of children — spiritual abuse as well — all these present pastoral problems within our congregations and among our ordained members, and it is essential that as churches that we are able say with absolute confidence … there is somebody here who is guaranteed to listen and take you seriously.”The archbishop said that the church also must be committed “to helping people not cope with or get over abuse but, simply live through it faithfully.”“But also we are committed to challenging those who behave in violent or inappropriate ways to look at their own behavior, to take responsibility for that behavior and get them to look beyond violence to alternative ways, creative ways of relating to those around them,” Williams said.The forum’s title, “We Can Stop Abuse,” was both a “very ambitious” title but also a “very appropriate one,” the archbishop said, because “the will is there, the experience is there, the skill is there and the imperative from God is there.”“With all those together, we really ought to be able to step up to this challenge,” he said.The Rev. Charles Waldgrave, the Ven. Warihi Campbell and Taimalie Kiwi Tamasese, all from the Diocese of Wellington’s Anglican Social Services Family Centre in Hutt Valley led the forum through a presentation of what they have learned in dealing with victims of abuse.Campbell challenged the council and the audience that evening, saying, “I don’t just want lip service, I want action” and he promised that he would “challenge every man in this building” to work to stop such violence and abuse.Kearon told the council Oct. 31 that “we have achieved a milestone” as a communion by talking about the question of abuse and gender-based violence. Now, he said, it is time to move from words to action.He asked the members to determine during conversation around tables, where they were seated by regions, “what actual initiatives could be done realistically within your own area.” The notes from those discussions will be given to the yet-to-be named monitoring group that will be charged with seeing that “these issues are actually addressed in the communion,” Kearon said.Bishop James Tengatenga of Southern Malawi, ACC chair, cautioned the council that“there is something about being church that interferes with some responses” to gender-based violence and abuse, and he urged the members to think of ways to overcome that interference.Garth Blake, a Sydney, Australia lawyer and convener of the communion’s new Safe Church Network, said during an Oct. 31 press briefing that many parts of the communion have begun talking about how to address the issues and are at various stages of response.What was then known as the Safe Church Coalition conducted a conference in 2011 in British Columbia that looked specifically at abuse in First Nations boarding schools, according to Blake. He said the group, which officially became a communion network on Oct. 30, will also run a regional conference in Africa in March 2014 at the request of the bishop members of the Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa (CAPA) and he is exploring with Asian members of the ACC the possibility of holding a conference in that region.“The issue of abuse is being named,” Blake said, adding that the network’s “role is also our challenge and that is how we can engage in a responsible way with all parts of the communion.”“There seems to be a number of different strands of this ACC that are really coming together around this issue,” he said.On Oct. 30, the council had passed Resolution 15.7, from the Inter-Anglican Family Network, the International Anglican Women’s Network and the Francophone Network, concerning gender-based violence. It endorses the Primates Meeting 2011 letter concerning gender-based violence (available here), “rejoices” in the work already being done in the communion to combat gender-based violence, recommends that the communion’s theological schools train all clergy and other ministers concerning gender-based violence, endorses the White Ribbon campaign, commends the archbishop of Canterbury and the churches in Burundi, Rwanda and Congo for gathering faith leaders and agencies to discern “what might be said and done together in responding to sexual violence as a weapon of war and terror” and endorses Anglican involvement in the We Will Speak Out coalition of churches and Christian agencies against sexual violence, and encourages churches to “provide an environment where boys and girls are equally valued and equally able to participate in learning and activities that foster positive and respectful relationships irrespective of gender, ability and ethnicity.”The communion’s attempts to address such abuse also have roots in the 2008 Lambeth Conference when the bishops and their spouses discussed power abuses in joint session. The session included a theatre group dramatizing Jesus’ attitude toward women. Another account of that session is here.ACC backgroundThe ACC is one of the four instruments of communion, the others being the archbishop of Canterbury (who serves as president of the ACC), the Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops, and the Primates Meeting.Formed in 1969, the ACC includes clergy and lay people, as well as bishops, among its delegates. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership. The ACC’s constitution is here.The council meets every three years or four years and the Auckland meeting is the council’s 15th since it was created.The Episcopal Church is represented by Josephine Hicks of North Carolina; the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio; and Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut.Jefferts Schori is attending the meeting in her role as a member of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee, which met here prior to the start of the ACC meeting. Douglas is also a member of the Standing Committee.A complete list of the ACC15 participants is here.All ENS coverage of ACC15 is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA November 1, 2012 at 6:42 am I am very pleased to read of the steps the church is talking to address abuse. It strengthens my faith to know that we officially are working to bring about God’s will for us in this way. I was particularly drawn to the paragraph regarding the position that it is our responsibility to assist the victims of abuse to “live through it faithfully.”Having considered this vision of care and concern, I am drawn to a further idea that I think is also very important. Abusers are not born, they are made. The abuser has often lived through being abused or witnessing the abuse of persons they loved and cared for. This is often routed deep in their past. In addition to taking responsibility and changing behavior, abusers need to know that through faith and support from the church they can not only change but come to terms with the devastation of their past.Surviving abuse as abused or abuser is a lifelong commitment. Through counseling, faith, and support victims and abusers can attain rewarding lives. The Anglican Communion is well placed to be a leader this struggle. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Jesse Glenn says: Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Consultative Council stands against gender-based violence Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Anglican Consultative Council Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 31, 2012 Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img mary counce says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Jul 26, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY RIP: South Carolina priest Beverly ‘Madre Clarisse’ Schroeder St. Mary’s School and Rhodes College chaplain People Jim Brinson says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Teresa Elizabeth Lawrence says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service January 13, 2015 at 4:43 pm I had the pleasure of meeting Beverly Madre Clarisse and served with her at the funeral service for my aunt, Phyllis Anduze. We got a chance to know one another as sisters in the Lord in the very short time we were together. She was a “kindred spirit” and a tremendous blessing to the family. Rev. Dr. Teresa E. Lawrence Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA July 28, 2013 at 9:21 pm She was a very special person. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Virginia Theological Seminary] The Rev. Beverly Clarisse Schroeder entered into the resurrection life on Saturday, July 20, 2013, at CarePartners’ Keever Solace Center in Asheville, NC.Known as Beverly to her family and given the title “Madre Clarisse” by the young people she served while a chaplain at St. Mary’s School and Rhodes College, both in Memphis, TN, she was serving as Priest-in-Charge at the Church of the Good Shepherd, York, SC, at the time of her death.Beverly was a well-educated and accomplished woman, having received a BM and MM in Violin Performance from The Manhattan School of Music, a JD from the Washington College of Law, and an MDiv in Theological Education for Ordination from The Virginia Theological Seminary.  Her career was as wide-ranging as her education and having begun as a professional concert violinist, she then worked as a concert manager for other professional musicians, followed by a time working on estates as a corporate lawyer.  Then, while an active lay chaplain, Beverly recognized and answered God’s call to the ordained ministry and was ordained a priest in The Episcopal Church on May 1, 2010.After ordination Madre Clarisse began her ordained ministry as a Curate at St. George’s Episcopal Church in Germantown, TN, until she accepted the call to the Church of the Good Shepherd in York in February 2012.  While at Good Shepherd her joy and evangelical nature drew people to her and to Good Shepherd as she reached out to everyone she ever met.  She was an active member of the Western York County Christian Ministerial Association, a member of and Chaplain for the Episcopal Diocese of Upper South Carolina Daughters of the King, a member of the Order of St. Luke, and a board member for the York Place Episcopal Home for Children.Beverly Clarisse was preceded in death by her beloved parents, Maria Isabel and John Schroeder.  She is survived by her brother Dr. Gerard Schroeder and his wife Sondra of Asheville NC, her brother Johan and his wife Elisabeth of Bielefeld, Germany, and nieces and nephew, Clarisse, Yannic, Isabel, Johanna and Gabrielle, and her friend The Rev’d Don Ledbetter of Rutherfordton, NC.The Requiem Eucharist for The Rev. Beverly Clarisse Schroeder will be on Saturday, July 27, 2013, at 11 a.m. at the Church of the Good Shepherd in York, SC.  The family will receive friends and loved ones after the service.  A luncheon will be provided by the Episcopal Church Women.  A nursery will also be provided. July 31, 2013 at 7:21 am I worked with Clarisse at St. Mary’s Episcopal School in Memphis. My life was enriched by her faith and kindness. Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments (3) Rector Martinsville, VA Obituary, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Tags Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Durante la eucaristía de clausura de la Convención General el 3 de julio, la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori lee una carta del presidente Barack Obama en que felicita a Michael Curry, que aparece a la022 derecha, por su elección como obispo primado de la Iglesia Episcopal. Foto de Sharon Sheridan/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] El presidente Barack Obama envío felicitaciones al obispo primado electo Michael Curry en una carta fechada el 2 de julio. La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori, la primera obispa primada de la Iglesia Episcopal y la primera mujer en alcanzar la primacía en la Comunión Anglicana, lee, durante la eucaristía de clausura de la 78ª. Convención General, la carta del Presidente a Curry, quien fuera electo el 27 de junio como el primer obispo primado afroamericano de la Iglesia Episcopal.LA CASA BLANCAWASHINGTON2 de julio de 2015Rvdmo. Michael Bruce CurryObispo primado electo de la Iglesia EpiscopalRaleigh, Carolina del NorteEstimado obispo Curry:Al tiempo de prepararse para comenzar a servir como Obispo Primado, le envío mi cálida felicitación.Desde los primeros tiempos de nuestra nación, las comunidades de fe a través de nuestro país nos han mostrado cómo la disposición a creer y la dedicación a cuidar de otros pueden enriquecer nuestras vidas. Su liderazgo a lo largo de los años ha reflejado su pujante visión de un mañana más integrado. Orientado por su compromiso con un futuro más compasivo y de mayores oportunidades, confío que continuará usando sus dones para llevar juntas a personas de todas las fes y procedencias a realizar los Estados Unidos que sabemos posible.De nuevo, felicitaciones. Le deseo todo lo mejor,Atentamente,[Aparece la pie la firma autógrafa del presidente Barack Obama] Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH El presidente Barack Obama envía felicitaciones al Obispo primado electo Michael Curry Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA General Convention 2015 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listingcenter_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Posted Jul 4, 2015 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention, Rector Bath, NC last_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img Comments are closed. By Pat McCaughanPosted Mar 22, 2016 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Power of public witness: Churches prepare to take the Passion outdoors This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Margaret Raigins says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Robert Yearwood, sexton of Trinity Church, carried the cross through the streets of Boston as area Christians remembered Jesus’ suffering with a march through the city on Good Friday 2015. The Rev. Rainey Dankel, also of Trinity, was one of the organizers of the “Stations of the City.” Photo: Patricia Hurley[Episcopal News Service] This Good Friday, for the Rev. Scott Slater and others in the Diocese of Maryland, Stations of the Cross will include a walk along Baltimore’s Route 40 corridor and stops to pray at places where gun violence has stolen lives.Elsewhere in the Episcopal Church, the ancient tradition of recalling Jesus’ path to the crucifixion also will be observed outdoors and in fresh and public ways.In Boston’s Copley Square, Matt Gin, 29, plans to be among a Trinity Church group who will use pantomime and tableaux to convey the depth of the Passion. “I’m portraying Jesus in the last five stations, the scary stations,” said Gin, in a recent interview with Episcopal News Service.And in Virginia, members of St. James’s Church’s young adult ministry will hike the stations on Holy Saturday, March 26, at Richmond’s Belle Isle, a popular spot for outdoor enthusiasts with powerful historical significance. The site of a prison camp for Union soldiers during the Civil War, it serves “as a powerful reminder that the work of reconciliation is not done yet,” according to the Rev. Carmen Germino, associate rector.Baltimore: An ‘unholy trinity’ of poverty, racism and violenceSlater, canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Maryland, said he’s driven through some areas of Baltimore many times “with the doors locked and the radio going” but wanted to walk the city and pray in the wake of riots that erupted after the death of Freddie Gray last year and the gun violence that continues to claim the lives of young African-Americans.Gray, 25, was arrested April 12, 2015, on a weapons charge in Baltimore. He suffered a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody and later died. His death sparked civil unrest. A judge declared a mistrial after jurors could not reach a verdict in the trial of the first of six police officers charged in Gray’s death.According to a 2012 U.S. Justice Department report, the Sandtown-Winchester/Harlem Park neighborhood where Gray lived is challenged by “a cycle of incarceration, poverty, and lost opportunity.”The report included some grim neighborhood realities: a $24,000 median household income from 2006-2012; a 51.8 percent unemployment rate; and a chronic high school absentee rate of nearly 50 percent. About one-third of the residential properties were vacant or abandoned.“The hopelessness (there) soaks into your bones. It’s palpable,” said Slater, who previously walked the area to plan this Friday’s observance. “Block after block of boarded-up houses and trash-strewn streets … you recognize it’s got to be tough to grow up here.”The 7-mile walk will encompass three Episcopal church sites and include ecumenical participants. Along the way, stops for prayer at 15 spots where young African-Americans have died in gun or other violence in the past year will challenge participants to face the grim reality of what “our bishop (Eugene Sutton) has called the unholy trinity of racism, poverty and violence,” Slater said.One stop is planned behind a gas station where “a young man was shot and killed. It’s a horrible place to die, a horrible place to live also,” he said. By seeing the names and places, Slater hopes to make both the circumstances of the contemporary lives and deaths and that of Jesus “much more real” to participants.“I’m hoping that the concept of walking through our own city and passing spots where real people with real names died violently, and praying for them will make the actual Good Friday experience of remembering Jesus a little more palpable.”The Rev. Ramelle McCall, 34, rector of St. Michael and All Angels Church in Baltimore, plans to join the prayer walk because he hopes to engage others “who have not seen extremely underprivileged areas of Baltimore.”“I felt like I was a Route 40 kid; I lived in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood” for several years while growing up, he told ENS.“It’s important to make a lot of people inside and outside the church aware of these communities that need help. I hope folks who do not live in Baltimore will see how the dynamics of socioeconomics, race and class – together – affect lives.”McCall said his church is less than five miles from where Gray was arrested. As the anniversary of Gray’s death approaches, McCall hopes efforts will continue “to see if we can build some relationships and see where that goes.”Slater agreed. He said there is “a real hunger for people from the diocese who don’t live in Baltimore city to do something tangible to connect with endemic problems in Baltimore.”McCall said he is looking forward to turning prayer to action. “The need has always been there, and I’m grateful that the diocese is really coordinating this event,” he said.“I would never have imagined that as a priest, as a black man, I would really be a part of a presumably diverse group of people that really has genuine care for these communities and really wants to see how the Spirit can work through all of us to be a real friend to these impoverished areas. That’s what I’m excited about.”At the same time, the walk will be a sobering reminder not only “that Jesus Christ died for us on this day … but that in parts of Baltimore, people may be seeing Good Friday all the time,” said McCall.“We’re trying to hold up, into the context of Good Friday, the unfortunate homicides that take place and the unfortunate loss of life that happens, and how we’re saddened by such death,” he added. At the same time, “we look to a future where maybe we can celebrate hope in the midst of a Good Friday where this violence is not constantly replayed.“We have the power to rewrite the narrative, so that this is not a Friday that we look at as lives lost, but as lives that will be saved in the near future.”Boston: Mime, tableaux, ‘Episcopal evangelism at its best’For members of Trinity Church, the challenge this Good Friday will be conveying the Passion in pantomime and tableaux, while juggling various roles as spectators, bystanders, hecklers and Jesus.Mary Davis is among the six church members who will take turns portraying Jesus during the last moments of his life in “a living Stations of the Cross” amid the sights and sounds of Boston’s bustling Copley Square.“We thought, ‘It’s a lot of weight to have one person be Jesus,’ ” said Davis. “We actually just walked it yesterday and it was very moving. It made me consider aspects of the story I never thought of before, like being inside the experience in a way that was pretty new. Just during the rehearsal, I found myself in tears several times.”The Rev. Rita Powell, Trinity’s associate rector for liturgy, organized the effort with assistance from Tony LoPresti, a New York theater professional, mime and friend of the Taizé community, who coached the actors.Workshops with LoPresti prepared them with the fundamentals of classic mime for the performance, which will begin on the steps of the church with the first station, in which Jesus is condemned to death. Accompanied by tambourine, drum and violin, and others reading Scripture, the actors will move to other corners of the square as they enact the stations.“It’s like an intersection between Stations of the Cross and the kind of more contemporary ‘stations of the city’ where important sites in the city are walked to and prayed. We are creating living stations of the cross using the liturgy from the (Episcopal Church’s) Book of Occasional Services,” Powell said.Amid the busy square, the performance will be a reminder, too, that “for a small group of people the crucifixion of Jesus was a really big deal, but most of the city was not moved by the event,” she said.Whether snow, rain or shine, the performance will go on as planned at 3:30 p.m. until the final station “where Jesus is stripped and crucified and died. That will happen in the fountain at Boylston Street and we will use the stone alcove on the front porch of the church.”For Gin, a Harvard University doctoral student who was baptized at last year’s Easter Vigil and will also be Jesus during the stations, that’s the scary part.“I have to say I am still not entirely comfortable with being Jesus in those five scenes and I think that’s good. I don’t think anyone should be comfortable with those scenes.”When Powell approached him to participate, Gin, an architectural historian, was intrigued by the blend of old tradition and new interpretation.Preparing for his various roles, of bystander, heckler, executioner and Jesus has “been a real challenge, trying to put myself not just in the story but in the mindset of all of these people. There’s a tendency to focus just on Jesus but all of the sudden you’re confronted with what was the guy thinking when he handed Jesus the cross. It’s been filled out for me in a new way.”Gin said he actually won’t be hanging on the cross in the same sense Jesus did; a special rig will support his body.  “There’s this weird physical tension where I look like I’m hanging from (the cross) but my body is supporting it.”At an earlier rehearsal, he realized “a beautiful tension in just that physicality. It’s so uncomfortable. And in a really honest way, I could see how painful and agonizing Jesus’ death actually was. That’s not something that people either like to think about or do think about. Even in our contemporary representations there’s the idea of the serene Christ on the cross. To actually be in that position takes it to a whole new level.”Also, doing it “in such a public place and public way implicates everyone, whether you’re passing by or ignoring it. That’s really powerful. Whether you’re a believer or not there’s something meaningful to be drawn not just from this performance but this story.”Davis agreed. “There’s this real joy in making this story come to life even though the story itself is one of intense suffering. That is generally how I feel in Holy Week. It’s really satisfying even though it’s really horrible to unearth that piece of our faith.”Powell said the event represents “Episcopal evangelism at its best. To take what we love most, the liturgical expression of what we think is important in the story and to bravely dare to tell that in public, simply has a power to it and a risk and an excitement to it that you can’t match any other way.”Richmond: ‘A powerful public witness’ amid stark remindersOn Holy Saturday, members of St. James’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, will sing, pray, and hike while recalling the last moments of Christ’s life on earth.The city’s popular Belle Isle Park and the James River will serve as a backdrop as members of the church’s Young Adult Ministry, who organized the hike, offer reflections at “stations” marked with artwork created by the Sunday school children.“It’s a wonderful, relaxed, inviting family atmosphere” yet offers reminders of the city’s challenges, said Danielle Dick, 40, who is planning to attend along with her 9-year-old son Aidan.Hikers enjoy the scenic beauty but also pass the crumbling ruins of former industrial plants. They also recall the island’s history as the site of a Civil War prison camp for Union soldiers. It serves as a reminder of how much the past “still has a profound impact on the present,” she said.The Rev. Carmen Germino agreed.“Initially, we chose Belle Isle (as a site for the first hike last year) because it is such a well-known and well-loved public park and outdoor place in Richmond. But, the more we got into it, we realized what an appropriate theological place it was … because at one time, Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy and we are very much still living out that legacy.”Recalling the park’s history “is a powerful reminder that the work of reconciliation in the city is not done yet and Holy Week can be a very powerful time to remember that.”Last year’s hike drew hundreds and “there was a joyful spirit about it which I think is appropriate for Holy Saturday, when we’ve come past Good Friday but we’re still not out of the darkness yet getting more joyful about Easter,” Germino said.“The stopping and starting, prayer and reflection is a reminder that the journey continues. It was a nice mix of experience and feeling, it helped the kids get excited about Easter.”Additionally, “it is a public witness in the middle of what is not usually a place of worship,” she said. The sheer physicality of the service appealed to those in from their early 20s to early 40s in the group.“As they were planning the liturgy, it made sense for it to be outdoors. The most powerful stations I’ve experienced are public ones, outside the walls of the church, as if I’m in Jerusalem, walking the Via Dolorosa.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 23, 2016 at 8:04 pm join us Judith! Saturday at 10:30 am. Meet near pedestrian bridge. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA March 23, 2016 at 10:59 am What a wonderful idea! Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Judith Wood says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (2) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Lent New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments (1) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC June 15, 2016 at 12:52 pm Esto me da ganas de aprender más de diseño e interiorismo. Muchas gracias. Submit a Job Listing Activistas interreligiosos en caminata de más de 300 kilómetros en apoyo a obreros agrícolas Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Amy Sowder Posted May 24, 2016 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Harold Halliwell says: Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Manifestantes portando pancartas, banderas y cornetas de aire mientras cruzaban cantando el Puente de Brooklyn hacia Manhattan el 21 de mayo, el séptimo día de los 18 que durará la Marcha de la Justicia para los Obreros Agrícolas, iniciado por el Ministerio Rural y Migrante. Foto de Amy Sowder.[Episcopal News Service] Un voto más.Si otro senador de Nueva York respalda la aprobación del proyecto de ley Normas laborales justas para los obreros agrícolas, ese proyecto podría convertirse en ley y afectar las vidas de más de 60.000 obreros agrícolas en todo el estado, muchos de los cuales suben escaleras para recoger manzanas, o se acuclillan para sacudirle la tierra a las cebollas y están de pie por horas para ordenar las coles en las cintas trasportadoras —con frecuencia durante 75 horas a la semana, sin ningún día libre, sin pago de horas extras ni compensación por lesiones de trabajo.“¿Qué queremos?” le gritaba el activista David Galarza a la multitud que portaba pancartas rojas en las que podían leerse: “Los obreros agrícolas de Nueva York merecen iguales derechos” mientras desfilaban bajo los icónicos arcos del puente de Brooklyn rumbo a Manhattan.“¡Justicia!”, replicaban los manifestantes al tiempo que agitaban banderas rojas y tocaban tambores africanos. “¿Cuándo la queremos?”, clamaba Galarza, “¡Ahora!”, replicaba el gentío.Casi 200 partidarios se incorporaron a la marcha en el segmento de Brooklyn y Manhattan de los 18 días de la Marcha por la Justicia del Obrero Agrícola, encabezada por el Ministerio Rural y Migrante (RMM por su sigla en inglés) una organización interreligiosa y sin fines de lucro de alcance estatal que dirige el Rdo. Richard Witt, director ejecutivo de RMM y sacerdote en la Diócesis Episcopal de Nueva York. La marcha se extiende por 321 kilómetros, desde frente a la oficina de John Flanagan, líder de la mayoría del Senado estatal de Nueva York, en Smithtown on Long Island y terminará en la escalinata del capitolio de Nueva York en Albany el 1 de junio.Un agente de la policía de Nueva York abre la marcha de los manifestantes al cruzar el puente de Brooklyn en dirección a Manhattan el 21 de mayo. Foto de Amy Sowder.El sábado 21 de mayo, el grupo hizo un alto para una conferencia de prensa en el Palacio Municipal de la ciudad de Nueva York, luego desfiló a través del SoHo para almorzar en la iglesia de San Marcos en el Bowery  [St. Mark’s Church-on-the-Bowery], prosiguiendo luego para participar en un mitin en Union Square antes de terminar el día en Washington Heights, en el extremo norte de Manhattan.“Esto es importante para todos los neoyorquinos de cualquier religión. Son los restos del racismo los que mantienen este problema vivo”, dijo el senador estatal Adriano Espaillat, D-por el Alto Manhattan, en las gradas del Palacio Municipal.Los obreros agrícolas están excluidos de los derechos y protecciones básicos que disfrutan los trabajadores de casi todos los demás ramos de la industria, una exclusión que los legisladores en el Sur exigieron antes de que convinieran con la aprobación de la Ley Nacional de Relaciones laborales de 1935 y la Ley de Normas Laborales Justas de 1938, ambas promovidas por el presidente Franklin Roosevelt. Los trabajadores domésticos estaban excluidos también, pero eso cambió en 2010, cuando se aprobó en Nueva York la Ley de los Derechos de los Empleados Domésticos.Los obreros agrícolas siguen estando excluidos. Los compradores de víveres que escogen unas cuantas relucientes manzanas Gala en su mercado local están disfrutando del trabajo de personas que se encuentran sepultadas en el fondo de la industria agrícola del estado [con un valor] de $5,400 millones repartidos entre 35.500 granjas, según el censo del Departamento de Agricultura de EE.UU. (USDA por su sigla en inglés) de 2012.Heriberto, de 26 años, es uno de esos obreros. Originario de Morelos, México, él trabajó por un salario mínimo cerca de 80 horas a la semana y sin ningún día libre durante más de cuatro años en una granja del valle del Hudson, cultivando pepinos, pimientos, cebollas, patatas y sandías.“Me gustaría ver un cambio. No sé por qué los obreros agrícolas no tienen derechos como los demás trabajadores”, dijo Heriberto, cuyo apellido no se da a conocer debido a su estatus migratorio, mientras desfilaba con el grupo: “No es un privilegio. Es una necesidad”.Él ha visto a compañeros, que se lesionaron en el trabajo, no poder trabajar y perder el empleo. Heriberto maneja un tractor y una grúa con elevador de horquilla, sin embargo le pagan como a un obrero no calificado. Las cosas, no obstante, han mejorado en los siete años que él lleva en Estados Unidos. Hace unos dos años, pudo negociar un aumento de salario y descansar los fines de semana, de manera que él es uno de los pocos obreros agrícolas que pudo participar en la marcha.El Rdo. Richard Witt, director ejecutivo del Ministerio Rural y Migrante, habló brevemente durante la Marcha por la Justicia del Obrero Agrícola en una conferencia de prensa en el Palacio Municipal de la ciudad de Nueva York a la que acudieron un senador estatal, una asambleísta, líderes de los derechos civiles, autores y clérigos de varias religiones. Foto de Amy Sowder.La mayoría de los manifestantes no tiene este tipo de experiencia de campo. Celia Baldwin estaba sentada en su banco de la iglesia episcopal de La Gracia [Grace Episcopal Church] en Hastings on Hudson hace unos nueve años, cuando oyó hablar a Witt sobre el Ministerio Rural y Migrante. Baldwin es maestra de una escuela elemental y no una “activista seria”, dijo ella, pero se sintió profundamente movida a ayudar una vez que tuvo conciencia de lo malas que eran las condiciones de trabajo para la gente que cultivaba los alimentos que ella consumía.“Esta organización representa una porción de la vida norteamericana que sólo puede expresarse a través de otros, y ellos son los que nos alimentan a todos nosotros”, dijo Baldwin mientras desfilaba. “¿Por qué participo? Yo como. Nadie puede decirte que no se relaciona con ellos”.El proyecto de ley por el que están manifestándose le brindaría a los obreros agrícolas pago de horas extras, un día opcional de descanso y el derecho a negociación colectiva.Manifestantes que reclamaban justicia para los obreros agrícolas, desfilaron, vocearon consignas y distribuyeron volantes a través del Bajo Manhattan el 21 de mayo durante la Marcha de la Justicia para los Obreros Agrícolas. Foto de Amy Sowder.Lentamente, las condiciones laborales para los obreros agrícolas de Nueva York han mejorado. En los años 90, la legislatura del estado ordenó que las fincas que tenían por lo menos cinco empleados, proporcionaran agua potable y baños en los campos. Hace unos 16 años, el salario mínimo para los obreros agrícolas  aumentó al mismo nivel que el salario mínimo estatal que recibe la mayoría de los otros trabajadores.Y después de una declaración del gobernador de Nueva York Andrew Cuomo a principios de este mes, el derecho a la negociación colectiva parece más probable. La Unión de Libertades Civiles de Nueva York presentó una demanda contra el Gobernador y contra el estado de Nueva York, en la que denunciaba que excluir a los obreros agrícolas del derecho a la negociación colectiva violaba la constitución del estado. El 10 de mayo, Cuomo se mostró de acuerdo. Ni él no el secretario de justicia del estado contestarían la demanda.“No toleraremos el abuso o la explotación de los obreros en ninguna industria”, dijo Cuomo. “Esta clara e innegable injusticia debe ser corregida”.El Buró Agrícola de Nueva York, la organización lobista de la agroempresa, es el principal opositor de este proyecto de ley. El buró dice que darles a los obreros agrícolas pago de horas extras —tiempo y medio por cada hora que sobrepase a la jornada de ocho horas diarias— hundiría a los pequeños granjeros que no pueden costearlo y que ya se encuentran en dificultades. El promedio de granjas de Nueva York gana anualmente unos $34.300 en dinero neto, según el censo del USDA de 2012.“Todo se vuelve un problema económico”, dijo Witt. “El Buró de Granjas argüiría que los obreros agrícolas ya están bastante regulados, pero no se trata de eso. Se trata de la igualdad para todos los trabajadores. ¿Qué tiene la agricultura para que dé una estructura moral diferente a la de cualquier otro negocio?”.Laura García, de 30 años, (al centro, vestida de negro) sacude una corneta de aire y sostiene un letrero mientras recorre unas cuantas cuadras por el distrito del SoHo al sur de Manhattan el séptimo día de los 18 que dura la Marcha por la Justicia de los Obreros Agrícolas. Como hija de un obrero agrícola, García se benefició de los programas del Ministerio Rural y Migrante para niños que le pusieron a su alcance oportunidades que estaban más allá de su experiencia y que le dieron esperanzas de un futuro más brillante. Hoy ella es la directora del programa Justicia Racial 1 para la YWCA. Foto de Amy SowderTom Toigo de la granja lechera Ronnybrook en Ancramdale, Nueva York, estaba vendiendo botellas de leche reciclables en el mercado campesino de Union Square cuando una mujer de las que desfilaba intentó entregarle un volante, y él le gritó que se largara.  Ella se marchó aprisa mientras Toigo la miraba con furia.“La mayoría de estas granjas no son grandes corporaciones. Son granjas de familia, y se irán a la quiebra”, decía Toigo con la voz más calmada al volver a ayudar a sus clientes. “Mi problema con el tiempo extra no es por explotar a la gente. Tiene que ver con la temporalidad del trabajo. Es la naturaleza de la industria agrícola”.El que los granjeros necesiten empleados que trabajen más horas durante la temporada alta no significa que no deban pagarles jornales de tiempo extra ni escalonarles sus turnos, según el RMM. Es un problema de derechos humanos, dijo Witt, y así opinó también el cardenal Timothy Dolan, el arzobispo catolicorromano de Nueva York, después que desfilara sobre el puente con el grupo y hablara en la conferencia de prensa.“No es una tontería”, le dijo Dolan a la multitud. “Se trata de derechos humanos básicos, de darle a los obreros agrícolas un poquito de dignidad y de respeto”.La Rda. Melissa DeRosia, vicepresidente de la junta del RMM y pastora de la iglesia presbiteriana de Gates en la zona densamente agrícola de Rochester, Nueva York, llevaba a su izquierda un enorme estandarte durante la marcha.“Esto es algo más que inmigración o justicia alimentaria”, afirmó. “Es acerca de la interconexión de todo ello y de cómo va a parar a nuestro plato”.– Amy Sowder es una escritora sobre temas de alimentación que reside en Brooklyn, Nueva York. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more


Month: June 2021

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ecumenical & Interreligious, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Religious leaders file Supreme Court brief against Trump travel ban The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Sep 14, 2017 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Refugee Ban, Rector Albany, NY center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA September 18, 2017 at 11:08 am I am almost ready to leave the Episcopal Church over this very kind of activity. Bishops take to much on themselves to speak for the pews. Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Diocese of Washington] Six Episcopal bishops and a wide-ranging group of other Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and Sikh leaders filed an amicus brief this week in the Supreme Court case challenging President Trump’s Executive Order No. 13780, known as the travel ban. The executive order, which the faith leaders claim discriminates against Muslims on the basis of religion, is being challenged in court by the state of Hawaii and the International Assistance Refugee Project.In the brief, the faith leaders argue that religious tolerance is “critical to the safety and well-being of our local and national community,” and that because the travel ban “selectively burdens Muslim-majority countries while exempting comparable Christian-majority countries,” the executive order “is anathema to this core tenet that all members of our coalition share.” The brief concludes that the order violates the Establishment Clause in the First Amendment, which prohibits the establishment of religion by Congress.“The Episcopal Diocese of Washington and I believe our nation’s security is imperiled, not secured, by policies that discriminate solely on the basis of religion,” said the Rt. Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, bishop of the Diocese of Washington and one of the signatories of the brief. “I’m proud to join this interfaith effort to urge the Supreme Court to overturn the travel ban, so that visitors to the U.S. and refugees, once fully vetted, may enter the country without discrimination on the basis of religion.”The interfaith coalition includes the Rt. Rev. Marc Handley Andrus, bishop of California; the Rt. Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, bishop of Washington; the Rt. Rev. Andrew Dietsche, bishop of New York; the Rt. Rev. Mary D. Glasspool, assistant bishop of New York; the Rt. Rev. Lawrence C. Provenzano, bishop of Long Island; and the Rt. Rev. Allen K. Shin, bishop suffragan of New York, as well as the National Council of Churches; United Methodist Church Women; Jewish congregations in New York, Washington, and Maryland; the Sikh Coalition; seven U.S. Franciscan provinces; United Church of Christ clergy; Union Theological Seminary; and the Muslim Public Affairs Council, among others. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID September 19, 2017 at 5:43 pm So very glad to see my own bishop, Marc Andrus, on this list. “For I was a stranger, and you invited me in.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Refugees Migration & Resettlement Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (2) Sarah Lawton says: Rector Shreveport, LA Donald Trump, last_img read more