Month: April 2021

Month: April 2021

first_imgCHESHIRE bakery Chatwins helped a pensioner who had been coming into the store for more than 80 years celebrate her 100th birthday.Chatwins of Nantwich offered Sarah Darlington a bouquet of flowers and a cake to mark the occasion. Mrs Darlington had been coming into the bakery once a week for the past 83 years for a meat and potato pie and a coffee.Her daughter Alice Baston said: “Chatwins is the best bakery. We’ve not found anywhere else that comes up to its standards. The staff are really friendly. My mum loves the pies and thinks they’re good value for money. They do nice cakes and custards too.”Chairman Edward Chatwin commented: “It’s a fabulous occasion to celebrate. She’s been coming to Chatwins for 83 years and we are very proud to have her as a customer.”last_img


Month: April 2021

first_imgBakers have welcomed news this week that the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) will refer the supply of groceries by UK retailers to the Competition Commission (CC) for investigation.National Association of Master Bakers (NA) chief executive David Smith told British Baker: “This is a lot more than we dared hope for. There will be a full inquiry.” The decision is thanks, in part, to the All Party Parliamentary Small Shops Group’s report on the future of the high street, to which the NA contributed, he said (British Baker, February 17, pg 5). The Scottish Association of Master Bakers (SAMB) CE Kirk Hunter said the SAMB will follow the progress of what is expected to be a two-year inquiry very closely. He said: “These things are never quick, but we want a thorough investigation.” The news comes after a public consultation by the OFT, to which over 1,200 responses were received, most of which supported a review. Evidence compiled by the OFT suggests the planning regime acts as a costly barrier to entry, making it difficult for new stores to open. Also, the big supermarkets’ buying power has increased, and aspects of their pricing behaviour – such as below-cost selling and price flexing – could distort competition. John Fingleton, CE of the OFT, said: “This will allow the CC to examine in detail all aspects of the grocery sector.”last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_img== Oct 7, 1955: Sainsbury’s ends home deliveries ==While many bakers dither over the delivery charge, they may like to consider the decision taken by one of the largest grocers in the country, J Sainsbury, which operates some 250 shops and has stopped the domestic delivery side of its business.In this case, the firm, in their letter of information to customers, said that “the maintenance of high quality and low price policy and the very severe cost of equipment, together with the payment to staff of wages which enabled them to maintain the proper standard of living, meant a continually decreasing amount available for additional services … We have now reluctantly come to the conclusion that we can no longer provide these additional services.”With a business such as Mssrs Sainsbury’s, no doubt, that policy may prove correct, but the proof will lie in the future.last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgIngredients supplier, Beacon Foods, has joined forces with a group of academics and food industry professionals with the aim of developing food industry skills in the country.The new group, Food Industry Skills Strategy Group, will oversee and direct the Food Industry Skills Project. Other members in the group include leading food producers, Premier Foods and Northern Foods, which seek to provide expert advice on the needs of the industry in order to provide employees and graduates with the skills and experience they need.The Higher education Funding Council has allocated £250,000 of funding to the project, which will go towards the development and design of a Masters course, and other industry specific short courses. The project also seeks to create a bursary scheme for food science related degrees at Welsh Universities. The University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (UWIC), Food Centre Wales and Improve are among a number of higher education institutions and skills groups that will focus on the developing professionals in the industry, specifically through skills delivery.“This group has pan-Wales representation and we have deliberately chosen companies from across a majority of key sectors, covering various products and processes like dairy, meat and organic produce,” said Helen Taylor, UWIC’s Food Industry Skills co-ordinator and chair of the group.Linda Lloyd, Beacon Foods’ human resources director, said: “We are delighted to be part of this exciting initiative and to be associated with a project that increases awareness of the food industry in Wales.”last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgThe Food Standards Agency (FSA) will launch a second wave of saturated fat posters early in 2010, as part of a renewed campaign to reduce saturated fat intake, following a drive to target pastry earlier this summer.“We intend to come back to saturated fat as a campaign – probably in January, with poster advertising,” Stephen Airey of the FSA told The Big Bakery Debate on Sat Fats and Calories. He told delegates at the Landmark Hotel in London that the strategy of the agency was to “set a direction of travel for the industry as a whole and to recognise that it’s in the hands of industry to deliver this advance in public health”.The FSA is currently consulting on a 10% reduction in sat fats in baked products. FSA head of nutrition Rosemary Hignett said the agency was working to influence European law to allow bakers to make a 10% reduction claim on-pack; the law currently requires a 30% reduction in fat to make a claim. “We agree with you that it would be helpful to make a 10% claim and are making that case to the European Commission at the moment,” she told delegates. “Signs are that they are very open to the argument that the 10% reduction claim will actually help reformulation, so please don’t take the fact that the law at the moment is how it will always be.”See this week’s issue, out 6 November, for the full story on The Big Bakery Debatelast_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgMany independent sandwich shops and cafés would go out of business if they were obliged to serve food that was healthy, fair, and green, according to a damning new report from the New Economics Foundation (NEF).An Inconvenient Sandwich: the Throwaway Economics of Takeaway Food criticises small outlets for selling “clone food” supplied by wholesalers, which is “heavily processed, globally sourced, and mass-produced”.NEF said they knew little about where the food came from and did not think their customers cared. Caught between cost constraints, customers’ demands for certain foods and their inability to specify beyond the suppliers’ inventories, they did not feel they had much control over the range or provenance of the food.However, the report was sympathetic to these outlets, adding: “Taking steps to improve environmental or social sustainability, for example, by raising the quality of the food, is likely to increase costs to such an extent that economic sustainability is threatened. This is because we are accustomed to paying an unrealistically low financial price for our food.”Jim Winship, director of the British Sandwich Association, said it was misleading to lump together sandwich bars, cafés, pizza operations, fish and chip shops and burger bars, as their customer profiles, products, ingredients and distribution channels were all quite different.He said: “Many businesses we deal with are committed to buying locally and supporting sustainability across their supply chains. Most customers buying lunchtime sandwiches demand quality and the research we do suggests they are prepared to pay for this provided they feel they are receiving value for money.”last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgLancashire-based firm Farmhouse Biscuits plans to extend production with a new 29,000sq ft unit at the site of a former mill as sales of its gluten-free biscuits continue to grow.The family-owned company, which employs 200 people at its current 175,000sq ft factory in the centre of Nelson, has secured planning permission to demolish the former Primrose Hill mill next door and build a new plant, offices and warehousing.The new facility, which should be completed by September, will be part of the current site and will initially be used for warehousing, with production lines added as the firm expands.”We’re desperately short of space at our current site and are having to rent warehousing, so it will be good to get everything under one roof,” said MD Philip McIvor.”In the longer term we may add gluten-free production lines to the unit to have a dedicated flour-free area. We’re growing at around 5-6% a year and quite a piece of that is coming from gluten-free.”Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, Farmhouse Biscuits manufactures a range of traditional, gluten-free, sugar-free and seasonal tins of biscuits, supplying department stores, gift shops, farm shops and garden centres, as well as local Asda stores.It also supplies own-label biscuits to Morrisons and exports goods to Australia, North America and Europe.last_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNationalNewsSouth Bend Market Twitter (Photo supplied/U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski) Second District Representative Jackie Walorski spoke with Michiana’s Morning News on Wednesday.The Congresswoman talked about this week’s Primary vote in the Hoosier state, the latest coronavirus information, and the recent nationwide unrest.Hear the conversation by clicking here. Google+ WhatsApp WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Pinterest Previous articlePolice investigating car vs. motorcycle crash in St. Joseph CountyNext articleFort Wayne among Top 10 cities with COVID unemployment increase Tommie Lee Facebook By Tommie Lee – June 3, 2020 0 526 Twitter Pinterest Jackie Walorski on virus, violence and voteslast_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_img WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Ivy Tech enrollment begins next week during Virtual Express Enrollment Day Facebook Twitter Pinterest Facebook TAGSAugustclassescollegecommunity collegeenrollmentIndianaIvy TechjulyJuneJune 25Virtual Express Enrollment Dayvirutal center_img IndianaLocalNews Google+ (Photo supplied/Ivy Tech Community College) Students will begin enrolling at Ivy Tech Community College during Virtual Express Enrollment Day next Thursday, June 25.During the event, prospective students will complete their enrollment steps virtually for classes that begin July 6 or August 24.Classes that begin July 6 will run for only four weeks and include:Business 101 – Introduction to BusinessBusiness 105 – Principles of ManagementBusiness 201 – Business LawMarketing 101 – Principles of MarketingPsychology 101 – Introduction to PsychologySoftware Development 120 – Computing LogicDuring Virtual Express Enrollment Day, participants will also have a chance to learn more about assessment, and either meet with an advisor or set up an appointment.The event runs from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Learn more by visiting ivytech.edu/eeday. By Brooklyne Beatty – June 16, 2020 0 341 Google+ WhatsApp Previous articleGeorgia man arrested in La Porte County after speeding, carrying loaded firearmNext articleStudy: majority of Americans think COVID-19 will lead to better work environment Brooklyne Beattylast_img read more


Month: April 2021

first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Twitter Twitter Facebook By Network Indiana – July 17, 2020 0 341 WhatsApp LaPorte County Commissioners mandate face masks in public Facebook Pinterest Google+ Google+ (Photo supplied/State Of Indiana) Anyone who is out in public in LaPorte County will have to wear a face mask.The mask mandate was approved Wednesday by the LaPorte County Commissioners by a vote of 2-1.It means you have to wear a mask while you are in an indoor area open to the public, including public transportation.It also applies to public spaces outdoors where a distance of 6 feet cannot be maintained from individuals outside the person’s own household. The same applies to “private indoor or outdoor areas,” the mandate states.Business owners are required to post the order at their entrances. They also have to require employees and visitors to wear masks.The order will stay in place until the LaPorte County Local Health Officer rescinds it.People exempt from mandate include:-Children under age 2 due to suffocation risk-Anyone with a physical disability that prevents easily wearing or removing the face covering-Anyone with a hearing disability who needs to remove the covering to use facial and mouth movements for communication-Anyone advised by a medical professional that wearing a covering may pose a health risk-Anyone who has trouble breathing or is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the face covering without assistance-Anyone engaged in a work-related activity where a face covering would present a hazard recognized by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration-Employees in a manufacturing work environment where management has determined high temperatures or concurrent use of coverings is impractical, unsafe or in cases where social distancing is in place-Any individual whose religious beliefs prevents them from wearing a face covering-Any restaurant or bar customer while diningLaw enforcement will not be enforcing the order. On the LaPorte County website, it says the following:“If you see someone without a face covering, assume they have a valid reason for not wearing one and increase your distance from that person. The most loving thing you can do for your community is to take care of yourself by wearing a face covering when out in public. We are all in this together.”Anyone with questions should call the Health Department at 219-325-5563. Previous articleNew program aims to keep remote workers engaged in their jobsNext articleWashington Park beach, zoo in Michigan City closed due to social distancing concerns Network Indiana Pinterest WhatsApplast_img read more


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