Month: December 2020

Month: December 2020

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Debapriya Mondal for the Economic Times of India:The government plans to scrap four special purpose vehicles (SPVs) set up for ultra mega power plants (UMPP) in Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Odisha due to lack of interest from the host states, a top government official has told ET. He added that as the government is focusing on UMPPs at Cheyyur in Tamil Nadu, Bedabahal in Odisha and Banka in Bihar, the other projects could take years to come up. “Keeping these running would only add to the expenditure.”While the four host states have claimed they are power surplus and do not require a plant of such large scale as of now, land acquisition has also become a hurdle for these UMPPs. “We do not have land for the Karnataka and Maharashtra projects. For the Odisha UMPP, no mine has been allotted so far,” the official said. These SPVs were set up around 2008-09 when the government launched the UMPP programme. For the Chhattisgarh UMPP at Surguja, the government initially failed to secure coal supply. Now, the state has conveyed that it does not want any such project as it has become power surplus. The Karnataka and Maharashtra projects were to be set up in coastal regions and meant to be fed on imported coal. However, the government failed to acquire any land for those and the states have also taken a backseat with the delays.Full article: Government plans to scrap four SPVs set up for UMPPs due to lack of interest from host states India Steps Back From 4 Proposed Coal-Fired Ultra Mega Power Plantslast_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Washington Examiner:The Trump administration has until December to save the largest coal-fired power plant in the West, but the prospects for the plant burning coal after 2019 are questionable.The deliberations over the Navajo Generating Station in Arizona are beginning to heat up after months of confidential, behind-the-scenes negotiations to secure new owners. The talks will continue into next year even after Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signs off on a key environmental determination for the plant and approves a lease extension by Dec. 1.Zinke ramped up efforts to save the plant after low natural gas prices prompted the owners to decide to close the plant by the end of the year. A temporary lease agreement was forged to keep the plant running until the end of 2019 or until a longer-term solution can be created.Resuscitating the plant could be the first test of President Trump’s resolve to restore demand for coal in the electricity sector, especially since the the government is a majority stakeholder in the plant it is seeking to save. The Interior Department owns a 24 percent stake in the power plant.“We’re looking at it more from an overall preventing the premature closure of coal plants because we think they’re important to grid resilience and reliability,” said Michelle Bloodworth, the chief operating officer of the pro-coal industry group American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity.A member of her group, coal mining company Peabody, is heavily involved in the negotiations. Bloodworth’s group will be working with the administration on developing new coal incentives proposed late last month by Energy Secretary Rick Perry that reinforce the value of coal plants such as the Navajo station, instead of scrapping them in favor of lower-cost natural gas plants.The Energy Department proposal looks to provide market incentives for coal plants that can store 90 days worth of fuel on site to maintain grid reliability during supply disruptions.The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is on an accelerated path to put out a rule creating the incentives in roughly the same time frame that Zinke has to sign off on the Navajo plant’s lease extension. The public comment period on the FERC’s proposed rule ends Monday. But it is not clear if the FERC plan would help make the economics better for the Navajo station beyond helping underscore the administration’s position that coal is necessary for a stable grid.Arizona utility commissioner Andy Tobin used the FERC plan in a letter this month to the power plant’s owners to emphasize its national security relevance and the need for the owners to maintain the plant as they prepare to leave in mid-December. The owners include the consortium Salt River Project, Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation, and utilities Tucson Electric Power, Nevada Power, and Arizona Public Service Co. The Salt River Project managed Interior’s stake in the power plant. Peabody operates the coal mine that feeds the plant.Tobin fears the owners will renege on their obligations to maintain the plant in the waning days of ownership, he told the Washington Examiner. Proponents say the plant’s continuing operation is necessary to support the Navajo and Hopi tribes that rely on it as a source of economic vitality, jobs and electricity, while the plant’s owners say it would mean higher prices for customers.“The owners made the difficult decision to end their participation in NGS because of the changing economics of the utility industry – primarily the cost of natural gas compared to coal generation,” said Scott Harelson, spokesman for the Salt River Project.“Our economic assessment remains the same today,” he said. “The owners continue to believe that operating the plant beyond 2019 would not be beneficial for their customers.”The plant is the largest coal-fired generator in the western half of the country and has its own dedicated mine to keep it running without disruption. Iif the plant closes, so does that mine.The plant was slated to close at the end of this year, but the Navajo leadership, which leases the land that the plant operates on, agreed to extend it through Dec. 2019.The new lease was approved in June, which means the plant will continue to generate electricity and employ workers for at least the next two years while the Interior Department figures out how to keep the plant running.The new lease also delays the laborious decommissioning process of scuttling the plant.Peabody Energy, the owner of the Kayenta Mine that feeds the power plant, is looking for a new consortium of owners, who would see a future in continuing to operate the coal-fired facility beyond 2019.An official with Peabody said it found a potential owner, who will begin evaluating running the power plant. The news satisfies an Oct. 1 deadline with the plant owners to secure a buyer. But the negotiations on a final agreement won’t be held until next year.“Lazard believes the Navajo Generating Station is a critical resource in the region for power generation and resource diversity, and from a total regional economic impact perspective,” said George Bilicic with the firm Lazard Fréres & Co. LLC, who is leading the transition process for Peabody. “Lazard took on this project because we believe there will be an optimal path forward that solves the needs of the many stakeholders involved, including the Navajo, Hopi and ratepayers in Arizona.”Continuing to burn coal at the big plant with its nearly 800 feet tall smokestacks is still in question. But that will hopefully be worked out in the Jan. 2018 – Dec. 2019 timeframe, according to industry and government officials.“We have been holding our breath to get it through 2019,” DuBray said. “I think we are optimistic” that the new lease will be approved before Jan. 1 and the process to transition the plant proceeds, he said.Zinke must sign off on the assessment and draft finding before the middle of December, when the Salt River owners leave. DuBray said the final environmental assessment will be complete by Dec. 1.The Bureau of Reclamation wants to “extend the lease of the plant beyond 2019 and then begin the retirement after 2019,” he said. “We are trying to provide some breathing room in this timeline.”More: Trump administration scrambles to save largest coal plant in the West No Progress in Negotiations to Save Arizona Coal Plantlast_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_imgCitigroup to halt all financing for thermal coal mining by 2030 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Citigroup Inc. will stop providing financial services to thermal coal-mining companies over the next 10 years to help accelerate the economy’s shift away from fossil fuels.By 2025, the bank won’t provide underwriting and advisory services to the industry and will cut its credit exposure in half, Citigroup said Monday in a statement. It plans to eliminate its exposure entirely by 2030.“Citi recognizes that emissions from fossil-fuel sectors in particular must be drastically reduced in the coming decade,” the company said in the statement. “The shift away from fossil fuels in pursuit of renewable and other sources of low-carbon energy will have a significant effect on clients in coal-fired power generation, coal mining and certain segments of the energy sector.”The lender has been vocal about its efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change. Last year, it reached a goal four years ahead of schedule to finance $100 billion of activities that address the problem. It also promoted Val Smith to be the New York-based firm’s first-ever chief sustainability officer.Citigroup updated its environmental and social policy framework on Friday to include the new targets, as well as a commitment to reject financing for oil and gas exploration and production in the Arctic. The company said it hasn’t provided such financing in the past.[Jenny Surane]More: Citi vows to stop working with thermal coal-mining companieslast_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_imgThe Second Best Trail in the Blue Ridge: The Art Loeb Trail is the highlight reel of the Southern Appalachia.Some days, everything seems to go your way. You make every traffic light, your favorite song plays on the radio, and you arrive at a quiet trailhead with no other cars in the parking lot. The sun smiles down on you from bluebird skies, and every step feels effortless.This was not one of those days.I was attempting to run the North Carolina’s Art Loeb Trail, the second-best footpath in the Blue Ridge—only the Appalachian Trail offers more. The Art Loeb is a highlight reel of Southern Appalachia—panoramic balds, pristine headwaters, unspoiled wilderness—packed into 31 scenic miles. I was hoping to run all of it in a single day.The Art Loeb Trail has been featured in every outdoor magazine (including this one), yet few ever tackle it end-to-end. Maybe it’s the name. Art Loeb was an overworked businessman who had a heart attack in his early 40s. He began walking in the woods. Eventually he connected a series of trails across the highest peaks and scenic stretches of Southern Appalachia.Today, the Art Loeb Trail is a mini-A.T., offering all of the high-elevation grandeur without all of the crowds. It is the best of trails; it is the worst of trails. It is butter-smooth singletrack near the Davidson River and a shin-bashing boulderdash through the raw Shining Rock wilderness. It is a thin ribbon of trail between panoramic heaven and laurel hell.A downpour greeted me at the trailhead, located on the northern edge of the Shining Rock Wilderness. I slipped on my hydration pack, stuffed with a few energy bars and gels, and plunged into the deluge. In the first three miles, the trail climbed 3,000 feet through thorn-choked overgrowth. I skidded across rain-slickened rock and face-planted in the mud. Then I reached an unmarked five-way trail junction—and realized my map was still in the car.A pink ribbon marked one of the trail options, so I decided to follow it—back down 3,000 feet to the next valley and several miles off-trail.Backtracking, I finally arrived back at the five-way junction and guessed wrong again. This time, I ended up on the summit of Cold Mountain, made famous by Charles Frazier’s novel. Views from the 6,000-foot peak should have made my sidetrack worthwhile, but the vistas were hidden behind the clouds’ gray gauze.I returned to the junction once more and finally found the main trail, which headed south toward the wilderness namesake. Shining Rock is a glittering quartz cap atop a nearly 6,000-foot ridge. To get there required crawling on all fours, slashing through brambles, and splashing through ankle-deep water for miles.Finally, the wilderness tunnel opened into a panorama of 6,000-foot peaks, including Black Balsam. When I arrived at the summit, gale-force winds nearly blew me off the mountain.I plunged down the flooded trail and arrived at the Blue Ridge Parkway. I checked my watch: I only had four hours left to cover the remaining 19 miles before nightfall, and of course, my headlamp was back in the car with my map.I shivered in the cold rain, watching tourists drive by in their cozy SUVs. This was the only road crossing and my last chance to bail. I reluctantly pressed on.Slick rock and mud underfoot made even the downhill miles slow-going. The rain intensified. “Focus on the positive,” I said out loud. But I could think of only one positive at that moment: I had plenty of water.As I slogged up Pilot Mountain, I tried to think shiny, happy thoughts. I repeated the oft-quoted mantra, “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” But today, I needed to just shut up and eat my damn lemons.I recalled reading the make-lemonade quote in a bedtime book to my three-year-old son. “I’m thirsty,” he replied.Remembering this, I accidentally smiled. It spilled into out-loud laughter as I replayed my string of bad decisions and bad luck. Amid the storm, an inverted rainbow had appeared.Let me be clear: I’ve always resented the overly cheery pixies who exhort everyone to SMILE! Phony smilers annoy the hell out of me. This was different. As that surprise smile spread across my face, I felt a wave of ease ripple through my body. My jaw unclenched, my stiff legs loosened, the tightness in my chest lifted, and for the first time all day, I was having fun.It’s easy to be positive and feel good when the sun is shining, but it’s only when things aren’t going your way, when you aren’t in the zone, when nothing is clicking, that your character is put to the test. And isn’t that really what adventure is all about?For the rest of the run, I soaked it all in—literally. My waterlogged shoes were lead weights around my feet, but I plodded the trail without the added heaviness of a bad attitude. Yes, it was raining sideways and numbingly cold, and I had wasted hours wandering lost in the wilderness. But I was alive, grateful to spend even this unlucky day exchanging my breath with the forest.Four hours later, I glided down to the Davidson River trailhead just as darkness was swallowing the twilight forest. I was utterly destroyed—trashed quads, blistered feet, bloody nipples—but not defeated. I looked up into the wet sky and smiled.– Will HarlanEditor in Chieflast_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_imgIt seems like I’ve heard a lot of writers brag in their ramblings about how they type on typewriters because real writers don’t need the backspace button, just the trash can.  I need a backspace and a spellchecker because I can’t keep events straight at this point.  I’ve been busy, but I’ve been fitting in rides, and a few races, and with three weeks until the Transylvania Epic, which I’ve been thinking about for 4 months, its time to really focus.  I’ve honed a system of getting in shape that seems to work consistently for me and it seems to be coming together again as far as I can tell.  I felt my fibers ticking in Pisgah this weekend for the Pisgah Mountain Bike Adventure Race, they were honed, there for that extra kick on the slick moves and snapping back after a few seconds rest.  I can feel fitness on the downhill’s as well as the ups, when I’m on form I have confidence and a reserve of strength for the surprise around the corner, the downed log, or the washed out drop.  “That’s why I love this,” I thought, riding squirrel in the wet, and feeling good.There is no race that more accurately captures the spirit of Pisgah then PMBAR.  In PMBAR you make your own course.  The riding is raw, steep, sometimes primitive, and sometimes wet.  This time it was really wet, and cold, 36 F on the top of Laurel Mountain on May 4th.  We love Pisgah but we almost hate it.  It’s rugged and it’s almost too hard.  When it’s wet the difficulty goes to the point where a lot of hotshot sponsored pros will be throwing their bikes.  Pisgah is too hard to be cool.  We don’t ride Pisgah to be cool, we just ride it because we can, and because when we’re done, and the aches subside, nostalgia takes hold and you only remember the goods.This year was the third year racing PMBAR with my longtime friend and riding partner Jacob McGayhey.  Most mountain bikers understand some mechanics, those that don’t end up running.  For those so inclined, it is possible to take your understanding of bicycle mechanics to the highest of levels.  To those folks we should all be grateful because these are the ones that are developing the gear that has been steadily advancing our sport.  I get a bit of special enjoyment out of riding the latest redesign of the Industry Nine wheels.  The trail 24 is a Jacob McGayhey brainchild with detailed refinements achieved through an absolute commitment to perfection and an attention to detail that is almost unmatched.  I love to see Jacob’s talents being channeled in such a fitting way and also love the fact that an Asheville company is making the best wheels on the planet.  Racing has a way of rewarding obsessive-compulsive behavior, and PMBAR fits the bill.  All options need to be analyzed, evaluated, and perpetually reprocessed.  You don’t have to do all that but it just may be what wins the race.  Eric Weaver did a masterful job of shuffling the deck this year and throwing out an array of checkpoints that left no clear path.  The options were numerous and the cost/benefits ultra close.  We nailed a route and skipped the bonus checkpoints of slate rock and Daniel Ridge.  It almost didn’t seem right to be able to win without riding the most miles.So two weeks to ride hard and a week to rest then seven days of heated competition.  Nothing is more fun then a race when you are feeling really good.  While I’m here let me not forget to give a big shout out on the megaphone to Bruce Dickman and Progold for helping get me to the TSE.  Thanks!last_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_imgEnter our Festival Guide Giveaway for a chance to win our festival prize pack that includes:Four (4) General Admission passes to FloydFest 12 on July 25-28andDeuter Aircontact 15+10 backpackThis contest is now closed! Thanks to all who entered and please check out all our other great giveaways.Rules and Regulations: Package must be redeemed within 1 year of winning  date. Entries must be received by mail or through the www.blueridgeoutdoors.com contest sign-up page by 12:00 noon EST on June 15th, 2013. One entry per person. One winner per household.  Sweepstakes open only to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United  States and the District of Columbia, who are 18 years of age or older.  Void wherever prohibited by law. Families and employees of Blue Ridge  Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors are not eligible. No  liability is assumed for lost, late, incomplete, inaccurate,  non-delivered or misdirected mail, or misdirected e-mail, garbled,  mistranscribed, faulty or incomplete telephone transmissions, for  technical hardware or software failures of any kind, lost or unavailable  network connection, or failed, incomplete or delayed computer  transmission or any human error which may occur in the receipt of  processing of the entries in this Sweepstakes. By entering the  sweepstakes, entrants agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine, Deuter and FloydFest reserve the right to contact entrants multiple times with special information  and offers. Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine reserves the right, at their  sole discretion, to disqualify any individual who tampers with the entry  process and to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the Sweepstakes. Winners agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors, their subsidiaries, affiliates, agents and promotion agencies  shall not be liable for injuries or losses of any kind resulting from  acceptance of or use of prizes. No substitutions or redemption of cash,  or transfer of prize permitted. Any taxes associated with winning any of  the prizes detailed below will be paid by the winner. Winners agree to  allow sponsors to use their name and pictures for purposes of promotion. Sponsors reserve the right to substitute a prize of equal or greater  value. All Federal, State and local laws and regulations apply.  Selection of winner will be chosen at random at the Blue Ridge Outdoors  office on or before June 30th, 6:00 PM EST 2013. Winners will be contacted by  the information they provided in the contest sign-up field and have 7 days to claim their prize before another winner will be picked. Odds of  winning will be determined by the total number of eligible entries received.last_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_imgYour daily outdoor news bulletin for September 30th, the day Wyoming became the first state to give women the vote, proving that in the land of no people, the woman is king:Blue Ridge Parkway to Stay OpenWith a U.S. government shutdown looming, and with Congress still not doing anything about it, federal agencies are attempting to go about their business like nothing is wrong while simultaneously going about their business like there is a class 5 hurricane bearing down on them. One such agency is the National Park Service which could affect Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Shenandoah National Park, and the Blue Ridge Parkway – of course there will be other casualties in the park system but those are the big fish so to speak. All inquiries into the matter are being deflected to the Department of the Interior, but a shutdown now could have a huge economic effect on not only the parks in question, but also the surrounding communities given this is the most popular time for all three. It is leaf peeping season after all. Officials with the Blue Ridge Parkway, while considering closing the 400+ mile road earlier in the week, now say the BRP will stay open through a shutdown although all campsites, historical sites, visitors centers, etc. will be closed.For a full report, and an interesting story on what Arizona tried to do with the Grand Canyon during the 1995 shutdown, see this National Parks Traveler story.National Registry of Stolen Bikes…MaybeWhen you have your bike stolen, there are many emotions that run through you. Maybe you feel betrayal that your privacy was violated, maybe you feel angry someone stole your whip, maybe you feel frustrated the police are not really able to do anything for you. Well, a group in Chicago is working on that last one. Through a site called Bike Index, a group of advocates is hoping to provide riders a more comprehensive way to track down their stolen bike. Many cities and communities already have bike registry services, but they usually involve paperwork and a trip to the police station, and they are kept private. Bike Index wants to streamline the process by allowing users to register their bikes online using the bikes serial number. With more access and public info, and more bikes registered, the operation will not only help people track down their bikes when they get stolen, but discourage future thefts. The service is only available in Chicago at this time, but the founders hope to expand nationwide.Check out the story on Fastcoexist.com and their Kickstarter campaign.Annapolis HonoredThe brackish community of Annapolis, Maryland is the latest community to receive an honor from the National Wildlife Federation. This week, the city was designated a National Wildlife Federation Community Wildlife Habitat, becoming the 71st Community Wildlife Habitat in the nation, and second in Maryland. It seems as though the honor is the cumulative capstone in Annapolis’s efforts to green up their city: “A Community Wildlife Habitat project creates multiple habitat areas in backyards, schoolyards, corporate properties, community gardens, parkland and other spaces.”Click here for more details via the Baltimore News Journal.last_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_imgThe advent of a new year is typically greeted with a resolution, some new goal – or perhaps an old goal revisited – that will result in a positive change.After reading the story of Leo Welch, my resolution for 2014 has changed. Gone are thoughts of getting outside more, losing a few pounds, or reducing the amount of time I spend on Facebook.Instead, I am simplifying. I hereby resolve to remember that there is no time like the present.Mississippi blues man Leo Welch is my inspiration. Last week, at the ripe young age of 81, Welch released his debut album, Sabougla Voices. Welch’s record came to be because, as an octogenarian, he grasped that simple concept – there is no time like the present. Welch, a longtime gospel blues player, picked up the phone and cold called the folks at Big Legal Mess, a Mississippi record label with juke joint all stars like Junior Kimbrough and Fred McDowell on its roster, and pitched his record.Instead of being turned down, which is what most of us what probably assume would happen at the end of most calls like this, Welch found himself with an invitation to come down to the label’s office to pick some tunes.Welch is, indeed, a fine musician; he plays guitar, harmonica, and fiddle, and once even had the opportunity to audition to B.B. King, though tough financial times kept Welch from making the trip to Memphis for the tryout.Sabougla Voices has the rough and ragged feel of a Mississippi juke joint blues jam, though Welch honed his craft playing in churches, which – these days – vastly outnumber the of juke joins in Mississippi. The songs on the record are honest and real, alternating between rollicking, electrified numbers like “Take Care Of Me Lord” and “Somebody Touched Me” to acoustic tunes like “The Lord Will Make A Way” and “Mother Loves Her Children.” Nowhere on any of these tracks is there an ounce of pretension. Instead, Welch sings of trial and tribulation, faith and praise, with both the confidence of the blues world’s greats and the repentant soul of a sinner.As I have listened to Sabougla Voices over the last few weeks, I cannot help but think of this 80-year-old man picking up the phone, dialing a record label, and pitching a record. Carpe diem, indeed. I want to latch on to the spirit that led to Welch’s phone call, as it is a definite reminder that there is no time like the present. If you have something you want to do, do it. Make the phone call. Climb the mountain. Run the river.That’s excellent advice for a brand new year.Make sure to check out “Praise His Name,” the lead cut from Sabougla Voices, on this month’s Trail Mix.  For more information on Leo Welch, surf over to www.biglegalmessrecords.com.last_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_imgI have a good friend who regularly refers to Elliot Root as “he.”And it drives me bananas.Elliot Root is not a “he.” Just like Jethro Tull isn’t a “he.” Just like Steely Dan isn’t a “he.” Just like Lynyrd Skynyrd (sort of) isn’t a “he.”Instead, Elliot Root is a band. A “they,” if you will. And I cannot emphasize enough how incredible I think they are.Few bands have resonated with me, over the last two years, the way Elliot Root has. If you were to check out my Spotify plays, my stats would be dominated by Elliot Root songs. You might think that, for weeks on end, I listened to little else.And you’d be right.The two EPs Elliot Root has released offer tremendous songwriting and a universally approachable sound. My wife digs them. My 17 year old son digs them. My 9 year old son digs them. My friends dig them, with one musical buddy recently offering the observation that Elliot Root simply hasn’t written a song he doesn’t like. That’s a double negative I can stand by.This week, Elliot Root will finally release their first full length record, Conjure. I have anticipated very few records like I have this one, with each released track whetting my appetite for the whole thing.Elliot Root is a band that has it. A nebulous thing, it is really hard to describe what it is. But I know it when I hear it.And they have it.I recently chatted with singer Scott Krueger about the new record, touring with Dwight Yoakam, and getting lost.BRO – Thanks for chatting, but I was hoping to talk to Mr. Root . . .SK – Oh, I didn’t know. Let me grab him for you!BRO – After putting out a couple EPs, how does it feel to have a long player out there?SK – It’s great to be able to do a full length album. It’s something we’ve been building towards for a while. We always wanted to have an “album” album, a cohesive piece of art that we could tell a story with.BRO – I know you guys spent some time on the road with Dwight Yoakam this summer. At first glance, it seems like an interesting pairing. How as that run of shows?SK – It was definitely an interesting pairing. We were quite surprised to hear that he asked us to join him on the road for a bit. We had a great time and Dwight and his crew treated us very well. The crowds were a bit surprised to see a band like us opening, but it was a challenge to try and connect with them and win them over every night.BRO – We are featuring “Lost Man Running” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?SK – This is a song about being okay with admitting that we can feel lost sometimes. I feel like we have pushed further and further in our culture towards a place where it is harder to admit when you feel lost or need a little help. I wanted to write something that I hoped people could resonate with and maybe find comfort in, knowing that someone else knows what their situation feels like.BRO – What’s your favorite city to get lost in?SK – We get to travel to a lot of cool places, so this answer is likely to change from time to time. Right now, I’d have to say my favorite place to get lost in this last year has been Washington, D.C. I don’t know why, but it has a really strange and surreal feeling. For all the power that the city holds, it actually is kind of quiet and neatly organized. It reminds me that behind all the crazy politics is a humanity. Even in the tense political times we are living in now, that gives me hope.Elliot Root will be celebrating the release of Conjure on Friday at the Red Brick Roads Music & Arts Festival in Clinton, Mississippi. Dates in Nashville and Bristol follow soon after.For more information on Elliot Root, the new record, or when they will hit a stage near you, surf on over to the band’s website.last_img read more


Month: December 2020

first_imgA popular state park is coping with the collapse of a retaining wall and portions of the Blue Ridge Parkway are closed after a deluge of heavy rainfall swept through western North Carolina on Monday, October 23.A retaining wall at Chimney Rock State Park, located about 25 miles southeast of Asheville in Rutherford County, collapsed after the area received 3.5 to 5 inches of rainfall over the span of several hours.Photo Courtesy Chimney Rock State ParkAccording to the Asheville Citizen Times, crews are actively working to clear the debris, and the park will be closed until further notice.The Rumbling Bald Access, popular with climbers, hikers and mountain bikers, was not affected and will remain open.The Blue Ridge Parkway is also closed, from mile marker 402.7 south of the N.C. 191/Brevard Road entrance to Milepost 408.4, due to a substantial washout near the Little Pisgah Ridge Tunnel at milemarker 407.Motorists, cyclist, and hikers are all being asked to avoid this area while park engineers assess the damage and monitor the site for additional damages.The Pisgah Inn and nearby campground remain open but are only accessible via 276.Multiple western North Carolina towns, including Boone and Asheville, experienced significant flooding as well.For updates regarding closures of the Blue Ridge Parkway, check out this real-time road map, and stay up to date with the status of Chimney Rock State Park by following them on Facebook.last_img read more


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