New bridge spans an old route

New bridge spans an old route

first_imgConstruction crews reached a milestone last week when they placed long steel girders across Whipple Creek, nearing the goal of connecting Northeast 10th Avenue with 450-foot long bridge. Yet an amateur roadway historian says it’s just the latest modifications to a crossing site people have relied on since European settlers began moving to the area.“This has come full circle,” said South Point resident Curt Cunningham, referencing the new bridge’s construction. “A hundred years ago, this was the thoroughfare. Now, Vancouver is starting to grow, and this road is needed again. Suburbia has finally met Whipple Creek.”Right now, the area is a construction site; cranes, loaders and dump trucks move along a muddy roadway on either side of a long span of freshly installed rusty girders.Clark County construction engineer Bart Arthur said the concrete bridge deck will likely be installed in early June and the project could be finished entirely in late October.The project is being built on the west side of Interstate 5 on Northeast 10th Avenue between Northeast 154th Street and Northeast 164th Street.The roughly $14.6 million bridge, a 450-foot-long, 48-foot-tall concrete and steel structure, should last for somewhere between 75 and 100 years.County officials say that when it’s all finished, the bridge will bring many benefits to local businesses and residents. By spanning Whipple Creek, it will connect two dead-end stretches of Northeast 10th Avenue, and that in turn will create a secondary access route to the Clark County Event Center at the Fairgrounds and an alternate route for emergency responders. It’s also expected to enhance local land uses by bringing new water and sewer utility lines to the area, which is anticipated to be the site of much future growth and development.last_img


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