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first_imgRuth Goins ’13 and Kabungo “Yanick” Mulumba ’15 were presented with the Joseph L. Barrett Award at a special ceremony on Wednesday. The Barrett Award is conferred by the Bureau of Study Counsel (BSC) in memory of Joseph L. Barrett ’73 to honor exceptional students who generously give their time and support to assist their peers in developing more meaningful college experiences.Goins was honored for her dedication and service to her fellow students in their academic pursuits. She has served at the BSC as a peer tutor, an ESL peer consultant, a reading course assistant, and a posterer. She was a peer tutor in Spanish and Arabic, and her experience learning languages informed her work as an ESL peer consultant supporting international students in polishing their English language skills.Mulumba was honored for his contributions to the Real Talk @ 5 Linden initiative in its inaugural year. Real Talk is a Friday afternoon salon where Harvard students meet for down-to-earth conversations about ideas and life. Mulumba was instrumental in helping to launch and sustain the initiative, coming up with the title, generating topics, publicizing the events, and updating its Facebook page and listserv. Most importantly, he set a tone of openness, sharing, and learning at the conversations.For more information.last_img read more


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first_imgHarvard men’s basketball head coach Tommy Amaker has released the team’s 2013-14 schedule, which features 12 games to be played at Lavietes Pavilion, a contest at TD Garden, and the program’s first trip to Alaska for the Carrs/Safeway Great Alaska Shootout.“We are excited about the schedule we have put together for this coming year,” said Amaker. “Our nonconference schedule will provide us with many opportunities to improve as a team before beginning another competitive Ivy League campaign. We look forward to getting the season under way.”Harvard will be in search of a fourth straight Ivy League title this season and a third straight trip to the NCAA Tournament. The Crimson went 20-10 last year, 11-3 in Ancient Eight play, before knocking off third-seeded New Mexico to reach the third round of March Madness. Harvard will also be vying for a fifth straight 20-win season, a feat that has never been accomplished in the Ivy League. The Crimson will face 15 opponents in 2013-14, which it played last year, going 16-5 in those contests with a 6-2 mark in nonconference action.The 103rd season of Harvard basketball opens Nov. 10 against Holy Cross as part of a tripleheader at TD Garden. The event will also feature two other regional rivalries as Boston College takes on UMass, and Northeastern squares off with Boston University.To read the full story and view the season’s schedule, visit the GoCrimson.com website. Tickets go on sale today (Aug. 27).last_img read more


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first_imgIt normally takes one or two days for a demolition team to gut out an old store to prepare it for a new owner, but something stopped one rugged crew in its tracks in Harvard Square earlier this year: tiled walls sporting a Harvard-related motif that dated back a century.When the team called the new tenant, Ayr Muir, the founder and CEO of the Clover Food Lab, to check out the tiles and see what he wanted to do next, the ready-to-ravage crew was surprised when he said, “We’re going to save them.”Today the popular vegetarian restaurant at 1326 Massachusetts Ave. offers its customers a rare peek at what a popular downtown Cambridge eatery looked like in 1913. The thoughtful rehab, which features a white tiled floor and walls with decorative crimson H’s and glass-painted school pennants adorning the inside perimeter, also demonstrates how a Harvard grad took on the challenge to restore a small part of the square’s hidden past.Seated in Harvard Yard, the animated Muir, M.B.A. ’04, said that when the tiles were discovered, the restaurant was about two months away from opening. “How could we open the store in time and still save the tiles, I thought?” Muir said he also considered who would absorb the cost of restoring the tiles, which would require many man-hours to scrape off the layers of accumulated gook. Muir said that he thought about raising the funds from Harvard alumni, but realized that with only weeks to go before the restaurant opened there was not enough time.Meeting with his general contractor, Muir said a decision was reached to do the tile cleanup work at night with a special restoration team, while the day crew prepared for the store’s opening. He Muir said the expense of the restoration work — about $300,000 — came out of his own pocket. “But it would have been unconscionable to just have let that history disappear. This store has an important story to tell,” Muir said. Interior of Hayes-Bickfords. Credit: Cambridge 38, vol. 3, no. 2 (Spring 1959); Cambridge Historical Commission The old directions to the restroom painted on the brick. Photos spring 2016. Credit: C.M. Sullivan photos; Cambridge Historical Commission Hayes-Bickfords storefront, ca. 1967. Photo Courtesy of Radcliffe Hayes-Bick city counterman 1959. Credit: Cambridge Historical Commission Waldorf Lunch with car in front. Credit: 1918 Harvard Class Album, Cambridge Historical Commission The University Bookstore on Mass. Ave. ca. 1885. Credit: Cambridge Historical Commission During the Clover construction, school pennants were discovered painted on the walls. Photos spring 2016. Credit: C.M. Sullivan photos; Cambridge Historical Commission Part of that story dates back to when Waldorf Lunch, a forerunner of the fast-food restaurant chain, opened its doors at the location in 1913. At its height, Waldorf Lunch had around 200 stores in seven adjacent states. After it closed in the mid-1930s, the Hayes-Bickford, another variant of the quick-service restaurant chain, took over the location until the early 1970s. In 1975, the site became the home of the Chinese restaurant Yenching. Clover took over the lease in 2016.“The Harvard tiles aren’t new to me,” said Charles Sullivan, M.C.P. ’70, executive director of the Cambridge Historical Commission. Sullivan said that he frequented the Hayes-Bickford in the late 1950s and remembers seeing the Harvard tiled floor. “But nobody at the time had any idea that there was a lot more of those tiles hiding behind those walls,” Sullivan said.When the tiled walls and school pennants were discovered earlier this year, Sullivan said that his office could only request that Muir preserve the tiles, because the Historical Commission has no jurisdiction over a storefront’s interior. From reviewing old building permits, Sullivan said that his office believes that the tiles were covered up in the 1930s when Hayes-Bickford took over the location. Regardless of when that happened, Sullivan is pleased that they are now uncovered. “The tiles are a treasure for all to enjoy,” he said.Donna Choih, assistant manager of the Harvard Square Clover store, agrees. “Sometimes we have customers come in just to check out the tiles,” she said. “I’ll ask them if they want to order, and they will say, ‘No, we were just attracted to the interior of the store.’” Choih said that a common question that customers have is whether the tiles are really old or just made to look old. Choih said she assures them that the aged tiles are indeed real.Fighting to be heard above the lunchtime din, Choih said that many customers are especially drawn to the glass-painted school pennants, which parade such names as Harvard, Yale, Bowdoin, Exeter, and Holy Cross. Choih said that patrons enjoy trying to find their alma maters among the diverse and often unfamiliar mix of names, including the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, a late 19th- and early 20th-century Native American boarding school that often competed successfully against Harvard’s football team.Considering the larger context of Harvard’s history, Sullivan said the Waldorf Lunch served an important function for Harvard, providing a regular place for students to eat before the House system was constructed. Sullivan said that whereas today Harvard undergraduates eat most of their meals in their House dining halls, in the beginning of the 20th century Harvard undergraduates ate mostly in dining establishments in and around Cambridge, like the Waldorf Lunch. Sullivan and others pointed out that this might help explain why the Waldorf opted for a Harvard-tiled motif, because it would have been welcoming to students. Additionally, the white tiles might have connoted good hygiene, a growing concern.Finishing up a comprehensive tour of the store, filled with plenty of illuminating historical references and tidbits, Muir finally stopped at a wall facing a bank of pennants. “All these restored pennants are as they looked over 100 years ago,” he said. “Except for one, Boston College, which was pried loose a long time ago.”Pointing to a pennant on the wall that reads Full Circle, Muir said this was the spot once filled by the Boston College banner. Muir said Full Circle is the name of the small independent school that his parents ran in upstate Massachusetts. Muir said putting the name of his parents’ school up on the wall had nothing to do with restoring a forgotten facet of Harvard or Cambridge’s history, but it was just about “paying respect to the folks.”Anthony Chiorazzi has an M.Phil. in social anthropology from Oxford University and a master’s degree in theological studies, with a focus on religion and the social sciences, from the Harvard Divinity School.SaveSave Wide view of the Clover construction. Photos spring 2016. Credit: C.M. Sullivan photos; Cambridge Historical Commission Ayr Muir (left) talks with Clover employee Erica Furgiuele under the glass-tile pennants lining the store. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more


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first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on May 24, 2014 Related Shows 17 Orchard Point The play, directed by Stella Powell-Jones and co-written by Anton Dudley, will run through May 24. View Comments Leave your baggage at the door, or at least the lobby! The world premiere of 17 Orchard Point celebrates its official opening on May 4 at The Beckett Theatre at Theatre Row. Tony winner Michele Pawk stars opposie the playwright Stephaine DiMaggio. 17 Orchard Point follows two generations of women battling to claim their home and history. Lydia (Pawk) lives by her motto, “leave your baggage at the door, or it will end up on your face.” A decade after fleeing Cleveland for one long night out in Vegas, leaving the family’s apartment building under the management of her daughter Vera (DiMaggio), Lydia returns to find a lifetime of “baggage” waiting for her inside.last_img read more


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first_imgBy Lorena Baires July 29, 2019 The United States reaffirmed its commitment to continue strengthening efforts from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras to counter transnational organized criminal organizations. U.S. Attorney General William Barr announced the decision during the Third Ministerial of the Northern Triangle Attorneys General, held May 16, in San Salvador, El Salvador.Attorneys general from four countries will implement a regional strategy in the following months, expanding their efforts to eradicate human trafficking, corruption, and financial crimes. Because it’s about common threats, policies and legislation will be designed to increase effectiveness and the scope of law enforcement agencies, public ministries, and judiciary authorities.“We have renewed our commitment to stand shoulder-to-shoulder in the fight against MS-13, the 18th Street Gang, and other transnational criminal groups that threaten the citizens of all our countries,” said Barr. “Together, we struck a hard blow on these criminal organizations.”“We, the four prosecutors, are willing to counter transnational crime,” Honduran Attorney General Óscar Chinchilla added. “We will focus on two fundamental measures: first, to attack financial structures of transnational criminal groups; second, to hit corruption, which is of key importance in this process.”Thanks to the U.S. support, authorities filed charges against more than 7,000 gang members from the Northern Triangle. “We are committed to reinforcing our efforts,” said Salvadoran Attorney General Raúl Melara. “With the U.S. government’s cooperation and collaboration, these efforts will yield better results.”During the meeting, participants signed an agreement to extend Operation Regional Shield, a combined effort to exchange information to combat gangs. Authorities conducted simultaneous operations in 2017 and 2018, and are preparing operations for 2019. For example, one of the most important achievements of the combined efforts between the United States and El Salvador is the arrest of MS-13 leader Armando Eliú Melgar, alias Blu, a gang member who led criminal activities on the U.S. east coast.“We maintain our commitment to these efforts, with the funds granted to support these police efforts through Operation [Regional] Shield,” said Barr.Forty-seven percent of Central Americans fled their countries and headed north in caravans that started in October 2018, because of the violence, threats, and insecurity these criminal groups pose, according to the report “El Salvador: Flow Monitoring Survey on Profiles and Humanitarian Needs of Migrants in Transit,” conducted by the United Nations’ International Organization for Migration. “I believe that improving security in our countries is important to reduce forced migration,” Barr added.The United States reaffirmed it will continue to fund the efforts through resident legal advisors at the Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development Assistance and Training in each country, with their counter transnational gang teams of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; units of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration; and efforts of the Department of Homeland Security to combat illegal human trafficking.To continue disrupting criminal groups, information exchange and experience in investigation are essential. “Cooperation between both nations is mutual because El Salvador sends analysts and investigators to the United States to work with law enforcement agencies and the investigation processes of criminal organizations in that country,” said Commissioner Howard Cotto, director of the National Civil Police.“The most important areas are human trafficking and smuggling, narcotrafficking, and gang issues. The attorney general [William Barr] has recognized our advances in that regard in El Salvador. We are permanently in contact with law enforcement agencies in the United States, and we always get that information. Today the attorney general confirmed they don’t intend to reduce the budget for security,” Commissioner Cotto concluded.last_img read more


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first_img December 15, 2003 On the Move December 15, 2003 On the Move On the Move Cody B. Vaughan-Birch, Christina L. Holly and Cathrine A. Herndon have joined Henderson Franklin’s Ft. Myers office as associates, and Cora Cisneros Molloy has been appointed chair of the office’s Workers’ Compensation Department. Office are located at 1715 Monroe St., P.O. Box 280, Ft. Myers, 33902-0280. Holly represents carriers and employers in the defense of workers’ compensation claims. Vaughan-Birch practices in the areas of land use, zoning, and environmental law. Herndon will practice in the areas of business planning and taxation. Molloy will maintain her practice representing insurance carriers and employers in the defense of workers’ compensation claims. Chief Deputy Courts Administrator Gay Lynne Inskeep has been selected to replace Sixth Judicial Circuit Courts Administrator Bill Lockhart when he retires December 31. Inskeep will head a non-judicial staff of 160 persons and oversee courthouse facilities at seven locations in Pasco and Pinellas counties. Louis Hillman-Waller has become a panel mediator with Salmon & Dulberg Mediation Services, Inc., Biscayne Building, Suite 155, 19 W. Flagler St., Miami 33130, phone (350) 371-5490. Hillman is available to mediate commercial and business cases, in Spanish if necessary. Robert J. Kline has joined the Tampa branch office of Smith Barney as a financial consultant. The office is at 100 N. Tampa St., Suite 3000, Tampa, phone (813) 227-2032. Terri J. Robbins, Nichole M. Juie, and Candy L. Murphy have become assistant public defenders with the 10th Circuit Office of the Public Defender, which has offices in Bartow, Wauchula and Sebring. Cassie L. Meyer and Katherine (Paige) Ward have become associated with Broad and Cassel at AmSouth Building, 100 North Tampa St., Suite 3500 Tampa 33602, phone (813) 225-3020. Meyer concentrates in commercial and construction litigation and real estate. Ward is joining the firm’s Commercial Litigation Practice Group. Hyram M. Montero and Janet Peralta Ochoa, formerly a partner and associate respectively with Montero Finizio and Velasquez, announced the opening of Montero and Ochoa, P.A., 200 S.E. Ninth St., Ft. Lauderdale 33316, phone (954) 767-6500. The firm concentrates on traumatic brain injuries, wrongful death, personal injury, premises liability, and malpractice. George Tate III, formerly with the Los Angeles District Attorney’s Office, has become associated with Broad and Cassel in the firm’s Orlando office at 390 North Orange Ave., Suite 1100, Orlando 32801, phone (407) 839-4200. Tate joins the firm’s Construction and Litigation Practice Group. Muller Mintz, P.A., and Akerman Senterfitt have announced a merger of the firms, which will continue to be known as Akerman Senterfitt. Muller Mintz has 22 lawyers in its Miami and Orlando offices, and practices exclusively in employment and labor law matters. The move will nearly double Akerman Senterfitt’s labor practice, and raise the size of the firm, which practices exclusively in Florida, to almost 400 lawyers. Terri Cohen and Jennifer Jamison have become associated with Porter Wright Morris & Arthur at 5801 Pelican Bay Boulevard, Suite 300, Naples 34108-2709, telephone (239) 593-2900. Laura L. Jacobs has become an associate with Carey, O’Malley, Whitaker & Manson, P.A., with offices at 712 S. Oregon Ave., Tampa 33606-2543, telephone (813) 250-0577. Jacobs will concentrate her practice in the area of environmental, land use, and governmental law. Robert A. Angueira, the former assistant U.S. trustee for the Southern District of Florida, has opened Robert A. Angueira, P.A., with offices at 4770 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 33021, telephone (954) 961-9989. The firm will practice in the areas of bankruptcy, creditor rights, and taxation. Kate Lynn and Shari Vrod announce the formation of Lynn & Vrod, L.L.C., with offices located at the Comeau Building, 319 Clematis St., Suite 610, West Palm Beach 33401, telephone (561) 659-2280. The firm will practice in the areas of criminal law and civil litigation including divorce, custody, support, and dependency matters. Victor A. Diaz announces the formation of the Diaz Law Group, P.L., with offices at 1101 N. Lake Destiny Rd., Suite 105, Maitland 32751, telephone (407) 667-8811. The firm will practice in the areas of real property, trusts, and probate, with emphasis on the representation of financial institutions. Ronna F. Young, a former disciplinary counsel for The Florida Bar, has joined Sachs Sax Klein in Boca Raton. Young will concentrate her practice in the areas of litigation, lawyer ethics, and attorney regulation. Fowler White Boggs Banker has named Hunter J. Brownlee, Linda J. Carbone, David A. Gemunder, Mitchell R. Golden, James M. Matulis, Elaine M. Rice, John D. Russell, and Jack A. Weiss shareholders. Brownlee is in the firm’s Tax Practice Group and his practice includes all areas of federal and state taxation, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate and partnership law. Carbone is in the firm’s Trust and Estate’s Practice Group and concentrates her practice in the area of estate planning, probate, and trust and estate administration. Gemunder is in the Corporate, Securities and Finance Practice Group. His practice focuses on the areas of mergers and acquisitions, securities, and general corporate law. Golden concentrates his practice in the areas of workers’ compensation, and general insurance defense in the Workers’ Compensation Practice Group. Matulis is in the firm’s Products Liability Practice Group and concentrates his practice in the area of intellectual property negotiation and litigation including resolving disputes over patents, trademarks, copyrights, Internet issues, and product liability claims. Rice is in the firm’s Securities, Financial Services and White Collar Practice Group. Her practice focuses on securities litigation and commercial litigation. Russell is in the firm’s Insurance Coverage Practice Group and his practice focuses on providing insurance clients with analysis and litigation of insurance coverage issues and extra-contractual exposure for all policy lines and types at both the trial and appellate level. Weiss is in the Workers’ Compensation Practice Group. His practice includes all aspects of workers’ compensation law, both at the trial and appellate level. Alvarez, Sambol, Winthrop & Madson, P.A., announces the relocation of offices to 100 S. Orange Ave., Suite 200, Orlando 32801, phone (407) 210-2796. Allan B. Kaiser, a former assistant United States attorney, has joined The Law Offices of Michael Diaz, Jr., with offices at the Bank of America Tower, 100 S.E. 2nd Street, Suite 3400, Miami 33131, telephone (305) 375-9220. He concentrates in white collar criminal defense and commercial litigation. Karyn L. Todd and Daphne M. Query have formed Todd & Query, P.A., with offices at 25 S.E. 2nd Ave., Suite 435, Miami 33131, telephone (305) 372-0787. The firm practices immigration law. Nicolas Q. Porter and K. Priscilla Zahner have become associates with de la Parte & Gilbert, P.A. Porter’s primary practice areas include litigation, business transactions, health care, corporate, and administrative law. Zahner’s primary areas of practice include litigation, business transactions, health care, and corporate law. Douglas C. Adams, Sean W. Firley, and Larissa Garriga have become associates of Morgan Lewis in Miami. Adams, formerly with Littler Mendelson, P.C., in Washington D.C., joins the firm’s Labor and Employment Law Practice Group; Firley, formerly of Carlton Fields, P.A., in Miami, joins the Litigation Department; and Garriga, a former clerk for Judge Juan M. Perez-Gimenez of the U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico, joins the Labor and Employment Law Practice Group. Frank Silva, formerly of Miami’s Butler Pappas Weihmuller Katz Craig, has become of counsel in the Litigation Department of Akerman Senterfitt in Miami. Silva will focus his practice on class actions and mold litigation. Dana E. Foster has joined Ackerman Link & Sartory, P.A., in West Palm Beach. Foster is a commercial litigator.last_img read more


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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A bicyclist was killed Friday night after he was stuck by a car in Holtsville, Suffolk County police said.The bicyclist, whose identity was not immediately released, was traveling in the right lane of traffic, west of Morris Avenue, at 10 p.m., when he was struck by a 2011 Hyundai heading east on Expressway Drive South, police said.The bicyclist was transported to Stony Brook University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police said. The 20-year-old driver was not injured. The driver was not cited for any traffic violations.The Hyundai was impounded for a safety check and the investigation is continuing, police said. Anyone with information about the crash is asked to call the Sixth Squad at 631-854-8652.last_img read more


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first_imgPDI-P Gerindra-Party megawati-soekarnoputri Prabowo-Subianto puan-maharani Sandiaga-Uno anies-baswedan 2024-presidential-election Log in with your social account Although it will be a while before the 2024 presidential election begins, the ruling Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) and the Gerindra Party have again showed close relations that may set the foundation for their future coalition.As the Constitution prevents President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo from running for a third term, the 2024 election will give political parties the opportunity to nominate their own members or support other prospective candidates.PDI-P chairwoman Megawati Soekarnoputri has kept close ties with Gerindra Party chairman Prabowo Subianto. She helped the former Army general who ran against Jokowi in last year’s election to reconcile with his former rival and join the government. Prabowo is also frequently seen at many PDI-P events. The latest was on Friday, in which both attended the inauguration of … Forgot Password ? Facebook Google Topics : Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register herelast_img read more


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first_imgPartnering with local public health agencies, community organizations, and the nonprofit community to expand Press Release,  Public Health As Pennsylvania plans to safely reopen the economy and recover from COVID-19, Governor Tom Wolf announced the creation of the Commonwealth Civilian Coronavirus Corps, a public service initiative that will support efforts this fall to increase testing and contact tracing and provide critical new job opportunities in the public health sector.“Our highest priority remains protecting public health and safety, but we must also look ahead to see how we can address future needs. To reopen our economy to its maximum potential, we will need to boost our ability to contain this highly transmissible virus,” Governor Wolf said. “The Commonwealth Civilian Coronavirus Corps will serve as a public service program that will expand our ability to conduct contact tracing and testing and mobilize Pennsylvanians to contain COVID-19.”The Wolf Administration’s continued measured and careful efforts to reopen Pennsylvania will depend on our ability to expand the availability of COVID-19 testing and develop a robust infrastructure to conduct surveillance and contact tracing. This work will allow Pennsylvanians to effectively monitor and respond to new cases and quantify mitigation efforts. It will help our phased reopening efforts while ensuring that the health care system does not become overwhelmed and that the transmission of disease continues to slow.As Pennsylvania plans to ramp up these efforts in the coming months, the Commonwealth Civilian Coronavirus Corps would bring these efforts to fruition by: May 06, 2020 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Pennsylvania’s existing testing and contact tracing initiatives;Leveraging additional resources to fund testing and contact tracing initiatives;Exploring creative ways to recruit experienced Pennsylvanians with health care and public health experience to support this initiative; andCoordinating existing resources deployed by the commonwealth, including community health nurses and county health departments who are currently conducting testing and contact tracing throughout the state.The Commonwealth Civilian Coronavirus Corps will also provide for a unique opportunity for Pennsylvania to recruit and train COVID-19-impacted dislocated and unemployed workers into public service for contact tracing roles, which would address Pennsylvania’s health and economic needs.To foster this new workforce, the Commonwealth Civilian Coronavirus Corps would:Engage partners in the workforce development system, existing allied health training programs, and AmeriCorps programs to build and strengthen a public health workforce across the commonwealth;Leverage existing workforce development resources to recruit, train, and connect the public health workforce with employment opportunities; andEngage public health and health care employers to connect trained workers with long-term career opportunities.“We have all made many sacrifices throughout this crisis and all we share a desire to move forward toward a healthier, safer and more prosperous future,” Governor Wolf said. “Through this public service initiative, Pennsylvanians will have opportunities in the months ahead to join a collective effort to ensure that we emerge from this pandemic a stronger commonwealth.”View this information in Spanish. Gov. Wolf Outlines Plans to Create Commonwealth Civilian Coronavirus Corps to Support Fall COVID-19 Recovery Effortslast_img read more


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first_imgThe rural residential site and the Merchant home are the only properties accessed by a bridge that extends from the western end of Boyd St across the Tugun bypass.A BUYER with deep pockets is being offered the chance to become a neighbour to Billabong founder Gordon Merchant on a Tugun hilltop.Offers are being sought for a 2.616ha site that neighbours Merchant’s sprawling ridge line home and enjoys expansive views that take in the ocean.The land, approved for a large luxury house, last changed hands as part of a $2.8 million transaction in 1995.The rural residential site and the Merchant home are the only properties accessed by a bridge that extends from the western end of Boyd St across the Tugun bypass.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North8 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoThe rural residential site and the Merchant home are the only properties accessed by a bridge that extends from the western end of Boyd St across the Tugun bypass.Brad Duncalfe, of Ray White Commercial GC South, yesterday said that the site offered exclusivity.“It’s got some of the best views and, of course, a private driveway.“This land’s perfect for someone looking for the ultimate in privacy, while still being close to the beach and services.”The property is being sold by Pacific International Properties, which is linked to Philippine businessman Philip Cea, a long-time Gold Coast property investor.Duncalfe said the Cea family two years ago had plans approved for a lavish 580sqm house and these plans were included in the sale offer.Merchant bought his 13.23ha property for $1.4 million in 1993 and went on to build his two-level home.When the Tugun bypass was built his access was in jeopardy until the State Government agreed to build a bridge over the new motorway section to service not only two properties but also the Woodgee walking trail.last_img read more