Category: lizjhtsh

Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins took responsibility for the death of junior Declan Sullivan in a Friday afternoon e-mail to the University community. “We are conducting an investigation and we must be careful not to pre-judge its results, but I will say this: Declan Sullivan was entrusted to our care, and we failed to keep him safe,” Jenkins said in the e-mail. “We at Notre Dame — and ultimately I, as President — are responsible. Words cannot express our sorrow to the Sullivan family and to all involved.” Sullivan, a videographer for the football team, died Oct. 27 after the hydraulic scissor lift from which he was filming football practice fell. Jenkins’ e-mail also announced the appointment of Peter Likins, former University of Arizona president, to lead an external review of the Notre Dame’s investigation into Sullivan’s death. Likins is also former president of Lehigh University, according to a University press release issued Friday. In addition to other roles in higher education, he has served as provost at Columbia University, where he was a professor and dean at the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Jenkins did not provide a timeline for the investigation, but said the University would make the results public when they became available. “Investigations and external reviews such as this take time, but I assure you that, when complete, we will issue a public report on the outcome, including information on the events of the afternoon of Oct. 27, any institutional ramifications and recommendations for safety policies in the future,” Jenkins said. Jenkins also expressed support for Head Football Coach Brian Kelly, in reaction to what he called “unfounded and unfair commentary and speculation.” “Coach Kelly was hired not only because of his football expertise, but because we believed his character and values accord with the highest standards of Notre Dame,” Jenkins said. “All we have seen since he came to Notre Dame, and everything we have learned in our investigation to date, have confirmed that belief. For those reasons I am confident that Coach Kelly has a bright future leading our football program.” Finally, the e-mail thanked Notre Dame students, faculty, staff, alumni and parents for concern and prayers following Sullivan’s death. “At the darkest moments, the love, and care, and faith of the Notre Dame family shines most brightly,” he said.last_img read more


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first_imgA two-semester, graded course sequence, the Moreau First Year Experience helps new students integrate their academic, co-curricular and residential experiences. This year’s class of first years recently completed their diversity and inclusion unit. However, the lesson plan appeared different from that of past years.Andrew Whittington, one of the co-directors of the Moreau program, said one great differences between this year and last year is all those involved in coordinating the course hoped to create a streamline for talking about inclusion and the value of diversity throughout the entire semester.“Regardless if our topics are explicitly on belonging at Notre Dame, or academic success or academic rigor, the spirit of inclusion is present in that conversation even if it is not specifically titled that,” Whittington said.Moreau advisers have been trained to use a dosing technique in which they are constantly introducing language, the Notre Dame community values and ways to engage in difficult conversations throughout the entire semester, so that when they move into more specific discussions, the topics are not entirely brand new to the first year students.Lauren Donahue, co-director of the Moreau program, explained her team has decided to take more of the micro lens to approaching diversity, which prompts students to conduct a deep introspection look into who they are, their identities and what is most salient for them.“This self-awareness enables them to be more open and to consider other identities and experiences, and how they differ from them[selves],” Donahoe said.In addition to starting at that micro level and talking about the students’ identities first, another change this year is when the course addressed implicit bias, which is usually taught in the spring semester. Donahue believes introducing topics early on, then revisiting them, allows the first years to have a more foundational, shared experience.“Last week’s lesson on diversity and inclusion has been really helpful in transitioning into a community that I am not used to,” first year Caroline Bender said. “It’s taught me a lot about how to live in a community with so much diversity and how to grow in this community.”She said her Moreau class focused on talking about different strategies, like having civil discussions with people who may not share similar beliefs or are from different backgrounds.Bender said one thing her class really emphasized was civil discourse and how to have respectful conversations to foster growth not division.Bender and her classmates were provided various strategies on how to speak with people from different backgrounds in a respectful manner. She learned conversation tips she had not previously considered.“I think it really helps to have these strategies, so that we are able to use them in everyday conversations,” Bender said.First year Eleanor Rey also spoke highly of last week’s course material, saying it was different, but eye opening.Rey said her professor placed an emphasis on microaggressions, teaching what they are and how people tend to frequently overlook them.“I realized how much I use microaggressions in daily life and how easy it is to stop using them, and to use a different type of language if you are curious about someone else’s culture,” Rey explained. “By doing this, you avoid hurting someone else’s feelings and invite community-building, instead of breaking down another with microaggressions, which most of the time are made without ill intentions.”While the topic of diversity and inclusion can be a sensitive subject for some students to speak about, Rey and Bender said their Moreau advisers had done a great job in making their discussions comfortable for them.Rey said her Moreau teacher has made it easy for her and her classmates to talk in class. She said he always speaks first after posing a question to the class, making the students feel comfortable in what can be a very nerve-racking period for the new college students.“We are really open in our Moreau class. We talk about everything and anything,” Rey said. “My adviser is the best. I find it extremely easy to share my thoughts with the class, and I think they feel the same way.”Tags: Diversity, first years, inclusion, moreaulast_img read more


Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgThe advent of a new year is typically greeted with a resolution, some new goal – or perhaps an old goal revisited – that will result in a positive change.After reading the story of Leo Welch, my resolution for 2014 has changed. Gone are thoughts of getting outside more, losing a few pounds, or reducing the amount of time I spend on Facebook.Instead, I am simplifying. I hereby resolve to remember that there is no time like the present.Mississippi blues man Leo Welch is my inspiration. Last week, at the ripe young age of 81, Welch released his debut album, Sabougla Voices. Welch’s record came to be because, as an octogenarian, he grasped that simple concept – there is no time like the present. Welch, a longtime gospel blues player, picked up the phone and cold called the folks at Big Legal Mess, a Mississippi record label with juke joint all stars like Junior Kimbrough and Fred McDowell on its roster, and pitched his record.Instead of being turned down, which is what most of us what probably assume would happen at the end of most calls like this, Welch found himself with an invitation to come down to the label’s office to pick some tunes.Welch is, indeed, a fine musician; he plays guitar, harmonica, and fiddle, and once even had the opportunity to audition to B.B. King, though tough financial times kept Welch from making the trip to Memphis for the tryout.Sabougla Voices has the rough and ragged feel of a Mississippi juke joint blues jam, though Welch honed his craft playing in churches, which – these days – vastly outnumber the of juke joins in Mississippi. The songs on the record are honest and real, alternating between rollicking, electrified numbers like “Take Care Of Me Lord” and “Somebody Touched Me” to acoustic tunes like “The Lord Will Make A Way” and “Mother Loves Her Children.” Nowhere on any of these tracks is there an ounce of pretension. Instead, Welch sings of trial and tribulation, faith and praise, with both the confidence of the blues world’s greats and the repentant soul of a sinner.As I have listened to Sabougla Voices over the last few weeks, I cannot help but think of this 80-year-old man picking up the phone, dialing a record label, and pitching a record. Carpe diem, indeed. I want to latch on to the spirit that led to Welch’s phone call, as it is a definite reminder that there is no time like the present. If you have something you want to do, do it. Make the phone call. Climb the mountain. Run the river.That’s excellent advice for a brand new year.Make sure to check out “Praise His Name,” the lead cut from Sabougla Voices, on this month’s Trail Mix.  For more information on Leo Welch, surf over to www.biglegalmessrecords.com.last_img read more


Category: lizjhtsh

first_imgI have a good friend who regularly refers to Elliot Root as “he.”And it drives me bananas.Elliot Root is not a “he.” Just like Jethro Tull isn’t a “he.” Just like Steely Dan isn’t a “he.” Just like Lynyrd Skynyrd (sort of) isn’t a “he.”Instead, Elliot Root is a band. A “they,” if you will. And I cannot emphasize enough how incredible I think they are.Few bands have resonated with me, over the last two years, the way Elliot Root has. If you were to check out my Spotify plays, my stats would be dominated by Elliot Root songs. You might think that, for weeks on end, I listened to little else.And you’d be right.The two EPs Elliot Root has released offer tremendous songwriting and a universally approachable sound. My wife digs them. My 17 year old son digs them. My 9 year old son digs them. My friends dig them, with one musical buddy recently offering the observation that Elliot Root simply hasn’t written a song he doesn’t like. That’s a double negative I can stand by.This week, Elliot Root will finally release their first full length record, Conjure. I have anticipated very few records like I have this one, with each released track whetting my appetite for the whole thing.Elliot Root is a band that has it. A nebulous thing, it is really hard to describe what it is. But I know it when I hear it.And they have it.I recently chatted with singer Scott Krueger about the new record, touring with Dwight Yoakam, and getting lost.BRO – Thanks for chatting, but I was hoping to talk to Mr. Root . . .SK – Oh, I didn’t know. Let me grab him for you!BRO – After putting out a couple EPs, how does it feel to have a long player out there?SK – It’s great to be able to do a full length album. It’s something we’ve been building towards for a while. We always wanted to have an “album” album, a cohesive piece of art that we could tell a story with.BRO – I know you guys spent some time on the road with Dwight Yoakam this summer. At first glance, it seems like an interesting pairing. How as that run of shows?SK – It was definitely an interesting pairing. We were quite surprised to hear that he asked us to join him on the road for a bit. We had a great time and Dwight and his crew treated us very well. The crowds were a bit surprised to see a band like us opening, but it was a challenge to try and connect with them and win them over every night.BRO – We are featuring “Lost Man Running” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?SK – This is a song about being okay with admitting that we can feel lost sometimes. I feel like we have pushed further and further in our culture towards a place where it is harder to admit when you feel lost or need a little help. I wanted to write something that I hoped people could resonate with and maybe find comfort in, knowing that someone else knows what their situation feels like.BRO – What’s your favorite city to get lost in?SK – We get to travel to a lot of cool places, so this answer is likely to change from time to time. Right now, I’d have to say my favorite place to get lost in this last year has been Washington, D.C. I don’t know why, but it has a really strange and surreal feeling. For all the power that the city holds, it actually is kind of quiet and neatly organized. It reminds me that behind all the crazy politics is a humanity. Even in the tense political times we are living in now, that gives me hope.Elliot Root will be celebrating the release of Conjure on Friday at the Red Brick Roads Music & Arts Festival in Clinton, Mississippi. Dates in Nashville and Bristol follow soon after.For more information on Elliot Root, the new record, or when they will hit a stage near you, surf on over to the band’s website.last_img read more


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first_imgAlkira has sold for $4 million.IT’S been listed with various agents on and off since 2013 and the asking price chopped and changed during that time, but property records now reveal the final sale price for one of Queensland’s more unusual and outstanding homes.Known as Alkira the home in Cape Tribulation has sold in a deal worth $4 million to a company owned by Victorian accountant David Brandi.The futuristic home was launched for sale in 2013 with a $14 million price tag.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours agoIt was relisted in June 2015 for $15 million before the asking price was dropped to $8.8 million in mid 2016.The home is on a 29.5 ha parcel of land which sits between the Great Barrier Reef and the Wet Tropics world heritage area.It is surrounded by rainforest and has more than 600 metres of absolute beach frontage and mountain views.It has its own helicopter pad and the swimming pool was shaped to reflect the owner’s favourite stamp the One Pound Jimmy.It was previously owned by philatelist Rod Perry and his wife Marider.The home won two Australian Institute of Architects awards for its designer Charles Wright and was a finalist in the World Architecture Festival 2014.last_img read more


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first_imgThe bomber blew herself up as soon as the tricycle stoppedA female suicide bomber blew herself up Friday at a big market in the northeast Nigerian city of Maiduguri, a vigilante and a witness said. “There had been a suicide attack on Gamboru market this morning. It was a female suicide bomber.The attack happened around 6:30 am (0530 GMT) as the grocers were arriving in the market which starts early,” according to the vigilante group ,Babakura Kolo.There is no immediate information on the number of victims, although witness accounts suggest that there have been casualties.“From accounts we gathered from people around, the woman arrived on a taxi tricycle, as every woman grocer does.She blew herself up as soon as the tricycle stopped in the midst of other tricycles that were dropping traders off,” Kolo told AFP.A witness, who declined to be named, corroborated this account. “I was at home when I heard a loud explosion that sent me rushing out of my house.It was coming from the Gamboru market. I went there, but from afar. The place was littered with victims and burning rickshaws,” the source told AFP.last_img read more


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first_imgOrleans, Ind. — Former Batesville educator and football coach Jeff Scalf has passed away, he was 65.Scalf taught in Batesville from 1973 to 1989 and led the Bulldogs to a regional title in 1986. Tim Hunter, director of operations for the Batesville Community School Corporation says, “ Scalf was a very influential coach and stressed the importance playing hard, fair and doing things the right way. “ Hunter said Scalf was a great motivator.Most recently Scalf served as the assistant principal at the Orleans Community School Corporation where he lived. Funeral arrangements are being handled by the McAdams Funeral Home in Orleans.last_img


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first_imgUEFA has released €236.5m to its 55 member associations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. The funds come from UEFA’s HatTrick assistance programme, set up in 2004 with the aim of supporting European football development. In this case, each member association including the FIGC will be able to use the cash however it sees fit. “Our sport is facing an unprecedented challenge brought about by the COVID-19 crisis,” UEFA President Aleksander Ceferin told the governing body’s official website.Advertisement Promoted Content7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black HolesTop 10 Disney Male Role ModelsThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s HystericalBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show You “UEFA wants to help its members to respond in ways that are appropriate to their specific circumstances. “As a result, we have agreed that up to €4.3m per association, paid for the remainder of this season and next, as well as part of the investment funding, can be used as our members see fit to rebuild the football community. “I believe this is a responsible decision to help as much as we can, and I am proud of the unity that football is showing throughout this crisis. read also:Premier League,UEFA warn Newcastle incoming owners over transfer plans “Without a doubt, football will be at the heart of life returning to normal. When that time comes, football must be ready to answer that call.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… last_img read more


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first_img read also:I don’t understand how Juventus play – Ronaldo’s sister slams Sarri “He’s a player of great quality, has done well everywhere,” said Ronaldo. “Certainly that if Inter doesn’t work, the doors of Valladolid are very open for him.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Real Valladolid owner, Ronaldo, has opened the door to signing Manchester United striker Alexis Sanchez. The Chile international is currently on-loan with Inter Milan, which are in talks with United about extending the deal into next season. However, Ronaldo has declared he’s a fan of Alexis and would welcome the former Barcelona star to Valladolid should he become available.Advertisementcenter_img Loading…last_img


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first_imgWomen’s Soccer boasts Daktronics All-American Selections Share Dec. 16, 2007PENSACOLA, Fla. – When the 2007 Daktronics NCAA Division II All-American team for Women’s Soccer was released, it marked the third straight season that West Florida has been represented with an All-American selection.Sophomore forward Dernelle Mascall earned All-American selection, while sophomore goalkeeper Courtney Jones was named Honorable Mention All-American represented UWF Women’s Soccer by being named to the Daktronics All-American Team. Mascall was the leading offensive weapon for the Argonauts this season, while Jones is the anchor of a tremendous West Florida defense that put together a run of over 900 minutes without allowing a goal.Argonaut Head Coach Joe Bartlinski talked about his two stars, “I am excited for these two players and their well deserved honors. Courtney led a defense that was number one in the country for shutout percentage at both the DI and DII level, and that is impressive.” Jones posted an impressive 0.44 goals against average this season, as she only allowed eight goals in 1,623 minutes of play and faced 114 shots from the opponents. She posted 14 shutouts this season, and now has a career total of 25 shutouts, which is among the top five best ever in the Gulf South Conference.Bartlinski is a defensive minded coach, but he was equally excited for his offensive weapon, as he talked about Mascall’s season. “Dernelle’s stats were equally impressive, as she smashed the UWF single season goals, and total points records. Finishing the season, ranked third nationally in both DI and DII for total points, just speaks for itself. However, the accomplishment I am most impressed with, is D (Dernelle Mascall) had 10 game winning goals, something unheard of at this level. She not only scored goals, but scored them at the right times.”Mascall scored 23 goals this season, including four hat-tricks, and her ten assists gave her a total of 56 points. Impressively, Mascall scored 23 goals with only 33 shots on goal. Her statistics show a very efficient offensive player, and to go with Jones’ defensive stats, the two stars were a big part of the Argonauts being ranked in the top 10 nationally for the entire season. Bartlinski concluded by saying, “What I am excited most about with both of these youngsters, is that they are both just sophomores. Their careers and the UWF future for Women’s Soccer is very bright.”For the first time in league history, the Gulf South Conference was represented by five players on the NCAA Division II Women’s Soccer All-America team. Two Montevallo players and one Ouachita Baptist player joined Mascall and Jones as All-American representatives from the GSC. Montevallo junior forward Stacey Balaam earned First Team honors while junior defender Adele Jackson was Honorable Mention. The honors are the first in Lady Falcons’ history. Ouachita Baptist sophomore defender Sarah Reed earned the Lady Tigers’ first All-America selection, as she was named to the third Team. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more