JAAA moves to keep cash flowing into track after Bolt

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first_imgPlans are afoot for the formation of the Jamaica Athletics Foundation, an organisation to raise funds for the development of track and field in Jamaica. This was revealed in an interview with Dr Warren Blake, the president of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) last week. The new entity will be reaching out to local corporate entities and Jamaicans overseas.Speaking at his JAAA office in Kingston, Blake said he worried about the possibility of dwindling corporate support after superstar sprinter Usain Bolt retires.”It is a concern because, as you know, Bolt himself pulls and attracts sponsorship to athletics, and people may say that when Bolt goes, there’s nothing in it for us,” he outlined, “so we have to convince our partners that it is worth their while to stay with us, that we’re running a good ship, that we can deliver the same brand alignment that we have done in the past.”The formation of the foundation is part of the JAAA’s response to that possibility.”It’s already a legal entity, the Jamaica Athletics Foundation, where we involve some top people locally and some members of the diaspora, and we have got some key people overseas involved”, he said optimistically.MONEY IS TIGHTHe doesn’t expect that the Sports Development Foundation (SDF) will be able to assist much after its efforts to install a new synthetic track at the G.C. Foster College for Physical Education. “Having been head of the SDF, I know the sort of cash flow they have”, he remarked, “and the money is really tight.”He is envisaging a foundation “where we can raise funds, both from corporate and a sort of crowd-funding venture, where members of the diaspora give a small amount each month”.He also revealed that his association has been able to avoid its customary year-end borrowing in 2016. “This is one of the first years in my memory since 2000 that we have not had to go to the bank to borrow to bridge that gap at this time of the year”, he recalled.To explain, he gave an insight into the JAAA cash flow that included a reference to the association’s major sponsor, German sportswear firm Puma. “The money from Puma, you know, comes in tranches and, usually, at this time of the year, we are facing a serious cash flow problem,” he reported. Blake said tighter management has enabled the association to avoid bank loans this year.last_img read more


Tag: 阜新夜网

first_img“Look at him,” said friend Richard Encinas, 46. “He looks like he came out of the Gold Rush.” The 87-year-old’s wiry frame, prominent mustache and earring set him apart from the other miners. He stands 5-foot-3 and sports a mane of long, wispy white hair, tattoos and gold jewelry. McGrath said he is a veteran of the Korean and Vietnam wars and that he has been shot nine times, once while mining in the East Fork. “I’ve got Purple Hearts up the \,” he said, stretching the neck of his sweater to display a scar from a bullet wound on his right shoulder. Despite his age and previous injuries, he hikes up and down the mountainsides, followed faithfully by his little old dog, Sniper. Up until two weeks ago, McGrath had been a volunteer for the informal fire department at Camp Williams, the mobile home and RV park he’s lived in since about 1990. Other than hunting for gold, his job was to keep watch in the community for fire and crime, he said “That’s his life,” said longtime friend and neighbor Rose Gonzalez, 54. “He’s the eyes of the mountain.” Mark Yelton, chief of the East Fork volunteer fire department, said McGrath was retired in good standing. He would not discuss details, but attributed the decision to McGrath’s age and health. “All he needs are his eyes and a finger to push the \ button,” said friend Manny Ortiz. Regardless, Gonzalez said McGrath gets up early in the morning and patrols the area in his old Ford pickup truck. “He stays out and talks to people, makes sure there’s no fire,” she said. “Everyone knows him up here. He’s the only one that’s a constant. You can always count on him.” Everyone indeed seems to have some familiarity with McGrath, who is known to most by his first name only. “He’s the unofficial mayor of the mountain,” Gonzalez said. Many of the newer miners said he’s given them pointers. “He got me started in all this,” said Wallace, who’s been mining for about five years. McGrath, he said, has a special knack for finding the glittering element which makes its way down into the river from Mount Baldy. Wallace remembered a day he’d come up with almost nothing in the river. Then McGrath bent down a few feet away and collected a teaspoon-full of gold. “That’s when I knew there was something to him,” Wallace said. McGrath knows the mountain better than most, his friends said. He can pick out animal tracks and predict the ebb and flow of the river based on the season. “He probably knows that area better than most people,” said Marty Dumpis, ranger for the San Gabriel River District. “He’s become somewhat of a patriarch.” Gonzalez said McGrath knows a lot about the local history. “Little does he know, he’s part of that history,” Gonzalez said. bethania.palma@sgvn.com (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2393 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! ANGELES NATIONAL FOREST – A throwback to the legendary prospectors of Eldoradoville, an East Fork mining town that washed away in floods nearly 150 years ago, Bernie McGrath is regarded as a living legend among the inhabitants of the mountain communities above Azusa. High above the smoggy air of the San Gabriel Valley, the whiskered miner dredges gold from the East Fork of the San Gabriel River. “It’s like his name is synonymous with gold up here,” said one of McGrath’s friends, Ed Wallace, 43. “Azusa gold and Bernie, those two things go together.” McGrath’s appearance even fits the role. last_img read more