Who’s Right In The Oracle-Forrester Slugfest?

Tag: 重庆贵族宝贝

first_imgRelated Posts Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Tags:#business applications#customer survey#forrester research#fusion#Oracle#peoplesoft#siebel#Software IT + Project Management: A Love Affair antone gonsalves Image courtesy of drserg/Shutterstock. Oracle Chief Executive Larry Ellison seldom shies away from a fight, so it’s no surprise his company came out swinging over an unfavorable Forrester Research report.Forrester certainly struck a nerve when it released a survey on Wednesday that found a majority of customers using Oracle’s e-Business Suite, PeopleSoft and Siebel business applications had no interest in switching to the company’s next-generation Fusion Applications. Those laggards are complicating Oracle’s efforts to reverse a slowdown in application revenue, Forrester said.Oracle’s ResponseIn a three-page counterattack, Oracle tore into the market-research firm. “This is a speculative note based on misconceptions and wrong hypotheses,” the company thundered.(See also “Why Oracle Fusion Doesn’t Excite Customers“)Despite Oracle’s ostensible outrage, its counterattack is unconvincing. The company claims Forrester did not talk to enough of its customers to back its claims, as if the firm was doing a random survey of all of Oracle’s customers.Forrester never said it was doing that kind of survey. Instead, the respondents came from 180 of the firm’s contacts that were responsible for choosing IT products and had knowledge of Oracle applications. “While nonrandom, the survey is still a valuable tool for understanding where users are today and where the industry is headed,” the report says.Commonsense would tell you that there are more reasons for Oracle customers to stay with the applications they have than to move to Fusion, which has a different code base. Such an undertaking is expensive, takes a long time and draws IT staff away from other pressing projects. With the older applications still being upgraded and working just fine, why would anyone want to make a major change?(See the full text of its rebuttal below.)The most damaging part of the survey was Forrester’s finding that 65% of customers using the older business applications had no plans to switch to Fusion. Another 24% were on the fence.Oracle complained that the survey only covered U.S. and European customers. Likewise, it noted that more than 40% of the respondents were in manufacturing, government, education and healthcare – industries it claims aren’t representative of Oracle’s overall customer base. For instance, Oracle cited an IDC report noting that Fusion doesn’t yet fully support manufacturing operations, implying that manufacturers might reasonably be less than interested in making the switch to immature applications.Ellison and company also moaned that many questions were phrased in a “negative way,” as if that somehow disqualified the responses. Such questions included “What do you dislike most about your firm’s most important Oracle applications?” and “Why doesn’t your firm plan to use Oracle Fusion Applications?”Who Do You Believe?The report also claimed that Oracle has no clear strategy for migrating customers to Fusion. The company disagreed, saying it has always told customers they could adopt pieces of the product portfolio at their own pace and that everything – old and new – would work together.Forrester also said that customers staying with the older applications were missing out on innovation. Again Oracle cried foul, saying that at Oracle OpenWorld last year, the company discussed future releases for E-Business Suite and PeopleSoft, as well as roadmaps for all its applications. Examples of innovation include iPad certification in PeopleSoft and new mobile capabilities in Siebel, Oracle said.Despite Oracle’s protestations, Forrester is not budging. “We stand by the report,” spokesman Phil LeClare said. So, readers will have to decide whom they believe. Personally, given Oracle’s recent lack of truth in advertising and its tendency to pretend to have cloud technology when it doesn’t, I’ll lean toward Forrester.Here’s the full Oracle rebuttal: 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more


Tag: 重庆贵族宝贝

first_imgVideo editors, check out these great websites that are a wealth of knowledge for all things post production. From great tutorials to quick tips, these sites will help you stay on top of your post production game!In a previous post, we rounded up the best filmmaking websites, but with all the great post production and video editing sites, that topic is surely deserving of it’s own hit list. In this roundup, we’ve picked the best video editing sites in 2013, great daily reads when you’re waiting on a render or have a few minutes to spare. Bookmark these!Know a video editing site that didn’t make the list? Share it in the comments below!Stay up to date with the post production industry, and pick up some new tips and skills in the process. In no particular order, the best post production and video editing sites:Little Frog in High DefShane Ross shares his experiences as a television editor in LA. An active post production voice on Twitter, Shane’s blog documents his “insider view” on the process of editing TV shows. He works mainly with Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro, but his insights on workflow are helpful for any editor. DigitalfilmsOliver Peters is a veteran film editor and colorist who shares his insights on post production. On his video editing site you’ll find a nice balance of tutorials, behind the scenes editing workflow and insightful thoughts on the industry.Philip HodgettsPhilip Hodgetts blogs about technology relating to post production and distribution. Philip is the mastermind behind many video editing plugins and software tools and he’s on the forefront of the future of post production. His blog is a fascinating read that covers topics both creative and technical. Creative ImpatienceBartlomiej Walczak writes about post production and color grading on his video editing blog, “Creative Impatience”. He focuses on the Adobe post production tools: Premiere Pro, After Effects, & SpeedGrade. He also offers useful free plugins (feathered crop, vignettes) for Premiere Pro & After Effects.  Monica Edits (Sh*tting Sparkles)The name of this video editing blog comes from a common joke about editors making crappy video look good. The blog is a first-person account of a pro video editor, Monica Daniel. She shares her stories from the edit suite, everything from project breakdowns to picking an ergonomic mouse for editing.A Nonlinear Editor’s BlogMichael is a German video and sound editor who shares his tips on video/audio post production. The blog is a mix of helpful articles, product reviews and tutorials, with a good bit of focus on working with audio in your video editing projects.SpliceVineEric Wise covers different video editing and post production subjects each month and often features expert guest writers. The content focuses on delivery and transmedia as well as editing and color grading. Be sure to check out the free email newsletter, as well as the SpliceVine monthly post production podcasts.Chris Hall Color Correction BlogIf you’re interested in color correction and color grading, Chris Hall’s color blog is chocked full of useful info. He offers a series of video tutorials “Anatomy of a Grade” on creating specific looks in DaVinci Resolve. This post production blog is recommended for those learning Resolve (there is a free Lite version) and wanting more control over their grading. Norman HollynNorman Hollyn is film editor and Professor who shares his thoughts on the industry. Subjects cover technique, theory, and technology.Jonny Elwyn (Toolbox)Jonny Elwyn is a a London based Editor (and fellow Premiumbeat blogger ) who shares his experiences and thoughts on post production. Jonny dishes up his own insight into editing and working with clients, and shares videos and interviews from leaders in the industry. He often compares the differences in video editing applications, like his popular series on switching to AVID Media Composer.Alexis Van Hurkman  (update: now writing for Pro Video Coalition)Alexis Van Hurkman is a well known colorist who wrote the Apple Color and DaVinci Resolve manuals, as well as several other books. On his own site he shares his knowledge of color grading, and he recently started another blog at Pro Video Coalition.  EditblogScott Simmons has been an active online authority on post production and video editing for several years now. He writes a frequently updated blog on ProVideo Coalition called The Edit Blog, where he shares his thoughts on the industry, as well as product reviews and video editing tips/tricks.Be sure to follow him on Twitter as well.Art of the GuillotineArt of the Guillotine (AotG) is an aggregate of the best post producution articles. On the site, film professor and post production pro Gordon Burkell reposts useful video editing and production related posts from around the web. The site is a hit list of relevant info for industry pros.Bonus SitesHere are 3 popular sites you may already know and are certainly worth checking out:ProLost is the blog of Stu Maschwitz ( Creative Director for Red Giant’s Magic Bullet). He writes about editing, color correction, and digital cinema.Digital Rebellion have a blog and “weekend read” that cover editing, industry news and their workflow apps.Tao of Color Offer a free weekly newsletter on color grading. Patrick saves you a lot of time and gathers great resources from the web.last_img read more