Odds & Ends: Adam Lambert Turned Down Hedwig & More

Tag: 爱上海PI

first_imgHere’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Adam Lambert Turned Down HedwigWe have to admit that here at Broadway.com we’ve been wondering why on earth Adam Lambert hasn’t headlined Hedwig and the Angry Inch on the Great White Way yet. We just know that Lambert would have killed it belting “Midnight Radio”…and all the rest. We now have our answer. “They offered. I’m flattered they asked me, but it’s not what I want to do right now. It’s an amazing role. Maybe one day. The thing about it is I don’t want to get in drag for eight shows a week,” Lambert told Queerty. We’re focusing on the “maybe one day,” part of that quote if you don’t mind, Mr. Lambert. Fortunately, we currently have the incredible Broadway.com Audience Choice Award-winning Darren Criss in the role at the Belasco Theatre, so we’re off to wig out over him (again!).Lea Michele Sheridan Smith Eyes Funny Girl Move over Lea Michele, there’s another potential Funny Girl headliner in the frame. British stage and screen star Sheridan Smith is in talks with director Michael Mayer about headlining the show at the Menier Chocolate Factory, the Daily Mail reports. Smith won two Oliviers in consecutive years for Legally Blonde and Flare Path; Mayer won the Tony for Spring Awakening and was nominated for Hedwig, Thoroughly Modern Millie, You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown and A View From the Bridge. This could end up being a West End—and Broadway—match in heaven.Jason Alexander is ‘100 percent’ Better Than Larry DavidJason Alexander has just taken over for Larry David in Fish in the Dark and he recently stopped by Live! with Kelly and Michael to chat about returning to Broadway. Is the show better with Alexander in it? “100 percent!” the Tony winner joked (we think!). Check out the interview below and then see for yourself if Alexander is an improvement (!) at the Cort Theatre through July 19. View Commentslast_img read more


Tag: 爱上海PI

first_imgThe Second Best Trail in the Blue Ridge: The Art Loeb Trail is the highlight reel of the Southern Appalachia.Some days, everything seems to go your way. You make every traffic light, your favorite song plays on the radio, and you arrive at a quiet trailhead with no other cars in the parking lot. The sun smiles down on you from bluebird skies, and every step feels effortless.This was not one of those days.I was attempting to run the North Carolina’s Art Loeb Trail, the second-best footpath in the Blue Ridge—only the Appalachian Trail offers more. The Art Loeb is a highlight reel of Southern Appalachia—panoramic balds, pristine headwaters, unspoiled wilderness—packed into 31 scenic miles. I was hoping to run all of it in a single day.The Art Loeb Trail has been featured in every outdoor magazine (including this one), yet few ever tackle it end-to-end. Maybe it’s the name. Art Loeb was an overworked businessman who had a heart attack in his early 40s. He began walking in the woods. Eventually he connected a series of trails across the highest peaks and scenic stretches of Southern Appalachia.Today, the Art Loeb Trail is a mini-A.T., offering all of the high-elevation grandeur without all of the crowds. It is the best of trails; it is the worst of trails. It is butter-smooth singletrack near the Davidson River and a shin-bashing boulderdash through the raw Shining Rock wilderness. It is a thin ribbon of trail between panoramic heaven and laurel hell.A downpour greeted me at the trailhead, located on the northern edge of the Shining Rock Wilderness. I slipped on my hydration pack, stuffed with a few energy bars and gels, and plunged into the deluge. In the first three miles, the trail climbed 3,000 feet through thorn-choked overgrowth. I skidded across rain-slickened rock and face-planted in the mud. Then I reached an unmarked five-way trail junction—and realized my map was still in the car.A pink ribbon marked one of the trail options, so I decided to follow it—back down 3,000 feet to the next valley and several miles off-trail.Backtracking, I finally arrived back at the five-way junction and guessed wrong again. This time, I ended up on the summit of Cold Mountain, made famous by Charles Frazier’s novel. Views from the 6,000-foot peak should have made my sidetrack worthwhile, but the vistas were hidden behind the clouds’ gray gauze.I returned to the junction once more and finally found the main trail, which headed south toward the wilderness namesake. Shining Rock is a glittering quartz cap atop a nearly 6,000-foot ridge. To get there required crawling on all fours, slashing through brambles, and splashing through ankle-deep water for miles.Finally, the wilderness tunnel opened into a panorama of 6,000-foot peaks, including Black Balsam. When I arrived at the summit, gale-force winds nearly blew me off the mountain.I plunged down the flooded trail and arrived at the Blue Ridge Parkway. I checked my watch: I only had four hours left to cover the remaining 19 miles before nightfall, and of course, my headlamp was back in the car with my map.I shivered in the cold rain, watching tourists drive by in their cozy SUVs. This was the only road crossing and my last chance to bail. I reluctantly pressed on.Slick rock and mud underfoot made even the downhill miles slow-going. The rain intensified. “Focus on the positive,” I said out loud. But I could think of only one positive at that moment: I had plenty of water.As I slogged up Pilot Mountain, I tried to think shiny, happy thoughts. I repeated the oft-quoted mantra, “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” But today, I needed to just shut up and eat my damn lemons.I recalled reading the make-lemonade quote in a bedtime book to my three-year-old son. “I’m thirsty,” he replied.Remembering this, I accidentally smiled. It spilled into out-loud laughter as I replayed my string of bad decisions and bad luck. Amid the storm, an inverted rainbow had appeared.Let me be clear: I’ve always resented the overly cheery pixies who exhort everyone to SMILE! Phony smilers annoy the hell out of me. This was different. As that surprise smile spread across my face, I felt a wave of ease ripple through my body. My jaw unclenched, my stiff legs loosened, the tightness in my chest lifted, and for the first time all day, I was having fun.It’s easy to be positive and feel good when the sun is shining, but it’s only when things aren’t going your way, when you aren’t in the zone, when nothing is clicking, that your character is put to the test. And isn’t that really what adventure is all about?For the rest of the run, I soaked it all in—literally. My waterlogged shoes were lead weights around my feet, but I plodded the trail without the added heaviness of a bad attitude. Yes, it was raining sideways and numbingly cold, and I had wasted hours wandering lost in the wilderness. But I was alive, grateful to spend even this unlucky day exchanging my breath with the forest.Four hours later, I glided down to the Davidson River trailhead just as darkness was swallowing the twilight forest. I was utterly destroyed—trashed quads, blistered feet, bloody nipples—but not defeated. I looked up into the wet sky and smiled.– Will HarlanEditor in Chieflast_img read more


Tag: 爱上海PI

first_imgLOS ANGELES – Ivan Hill, the so-called “60 Slayer,” received the death sentence Wednesday for the strangulation murders of six women. In handing down the sentence, Judge Larry Fidler said Hill clearly deserved the punishment, even though nobody may ever know why he chose to so coldly hunt and kill his victims more than a decade ago. “I can find no reason, Mr. Hill, not to sentence you to death,” the Los Angeles Superior Court judge told him. Hill was convicted of strangling the women, most of whom were prostitutes, over a three-month span in 1993 and 1994. Their bodies were left in cities along the Pomona (60) Freeway between Ontario and Industry, earning him the nickname “60 Slayer.” Killed were Helen Ruth Hill of West Covina, Roxanne Bates of Montclair, Betty Sue Harris of Pomona, Donna Goldsmith of Pomona, Cheryl Sayers of Ontario and Debra Brown of Los Angeles. Hill, 45, was sentenced at the end of an emotionally draining morning in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom, where relatives of the victims told Hill and the judge of the depth of their losses. They described how the murders shattered their families, deprived children of mothers and grandmothers, and forced parents to bury their own children. “I know God says forgive and forget,” said Toni Goldsmith, who was 15 when her mother was strangled. “But I can never forgive you,” she told Hill, “And I can never forget.” Sayers’ brother, Kevin, read a letter written by Sayers’ daughter, who was 12 when her mother died. The woman, now 26, wrote that she hopes Hill will feel as much pain and misery in his death as he caused his victims. “You are miserable and worthless, and killing you would put me at ease,” the woman wrote. Hill, dressed in an orange jumpsuit and chained at the waist, turned his head and calmly looked each grieving relative in the eye as they addressed him. He showed no emotion throughout the morning and said virtually nothing during the court hearing, even when the judge invited him to make a statement. Outside the courtroom, Hill’s attorneys said he remained silent because the hearing was too emotionally taxing on him. “I’m sure the day will come when he will be able to tell them how very, very sorry he is about this,” attorney Jennifer Friedman said. Friedman said life in prison without the possibility of parole would have been a better penalty for Hill and would have helped relatives of the victims to heal sooner. Hill has never denied being the killer. However, his lawyers argued during his trial that he deserved leniency in his sentence because he grew up in an abusive home and was savagely beaten as a child. Before sentencing Hill on Wednesday, Fidler denied a defense request to either grant him a new trial or reduce his sentence to life in prison without parole. The judge said he considered Hill’s upbringing in deciding whether to reduce the penalty, but concluded whatever problems Hill suffered as a boy did not outweigh the heinous nature of the six killings. “It does not even come close,” Fidler said. Hill was not identified as a suspect until a DNA hit pointed to him in 2003. Police believe Hill likely killed at least two other women in addition to the six murders for which he was convicted. However, prosecutors didn’t charge him in those deaths because they didn’t have enough evidence until his case was well under way. Hill also has a long rap sheet, which includes a 1979 murder conviction for his role in the shooting death of a Glendora liquor store clerk during a robbery. Hill’s death sentence will be automatically appealed to the California Supreme Court. He is scheduled to be transferred to Death Row at San Quentin State Prison within the next 10 days. r_leveque@dailybulletin.com (909) 483-9325 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more