Senate Passes Acts to Restructure LNP, BIN

Tag: 爱上海419新的连接

first_imgThe plenary of the Liberian Senate on its last day sitting before the Easter break, unanimously voted and passed into law the restructured Liberia National Police (LNP) Act and the Liberia Immigration Service (LIS) Act of 2015, respectively.The two Acts were among several bills submitted last October and November to the Upper House by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf for enactment into law, on the first day of the six weeks extended sitting expected from the suspension of their annual agriculture break which she requested of members of that body through a proclamation.In a letter accompanying the new Acts and read before plenary Thursday, the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Defense, Intelligence, Security and Veteran Affairs Stephen Zargo, informed his colleagues that members of his committee reached their decision urging for passage after initiating several public hearings with the full participation of current and past national security actors, civil society groups and representatives of the country’s foreign partners.“After various consultations and public hearings, I hereby present the final draft of the bill, the Liberia National Police Act and the Liberia Immigration Act, and therefore recommend to the honorable Senate the passage into law of these two most important national security bills,” Chairman Zargo noted in the brief letter.Proffering the motion for passage from his Gbarpolu County seat (as Vice President Joseph Boakai, President of the Senate presided), Pro Tempore Armah Jallah urged his colleagues to give the two Acts the third reading category which is the last gate before passage. His plea was granted unanimously.Members of the committee included Senators Morris Saytumah, Bomi; Jonathan Kaipay, Grand Bassa; Prince Y. Johnson, Nimba; Albert Chie, Grand Kru; Danile Naatehn, Gbarpolu; George Weah, Montserrado; H. Dan Morais, Maryland; Conmany Wesseh, River Gee; Francis Paye, Rivercess; Jewel Howard Taylor, Bong; J. Milton Teahjay, Sinoe, and Stephen A. Zargo, chairman.It may be recalled that in a letter dated October 30, 2015 addressed to Senators sitting in extended session, President Sirleaf informed the Legislature that the Liberia National Police (LNP) Act of 2015 puts into place the necessary legal framework of the establishment of the LNP as a semi-autonomous agency under the Ministry of Justice to be headed by an Inspector General of police. In keeping with the purpose of this new bill, President Sirleaf noted in her letter, “the LNP acting as an instrument of the state must provide an atmosphere of safety and security, protect lives and property and foster respect for human rights.” She asserted that it represents a significant milestone in the process leading to the UNMIL transition.President Sirleaf reminded the lawmakers that when signed into law, the Act will fulfill the commitment of the government to the United Nations Security Council towards a new police act approved prior to the September 2015 review of the UN Mission mandate in Liberia.With respect to the Liberia Immigration Service (LIS) Act of 2015, President Sirleaf in her letter said passage of the Act into law replaces the Bureau of Immigration & Naturalization (BIN), which was established within the Ministry of Justice under Section 22.11, Sub-chapter (a), Chapter 22 of the Executive Laws; Chapter 12 of the Liberia Code of Law Revised; and Section 2.2 of the Alien Nationality Law of Liberia as amended is now repealed.The LIS Act of 2015 by passage shall now enforce all laws and regulations relating to immigration, citizenship, naturalization and related matters.In the Act submitted to the Senate, President Sirleaf emphasized that the LIS Act addresses policy issues that need to be in conformity with international standards. The issue of providing a clear heretical structure, decentralization of Liberia Immigration Service, respect for law, disciplined immigration officers, immigration officers or civilian personnel being subjected to civilian authority of a civilian complaint review commission, among others, were all cardinal points considered in this act, President Sirleaf noted.“Mr. Pro Tempore, in fulfillment of Liberia’s commitment to maintain a secure and stable country in the absence of UNMIL, and considering the improved governance and heretical structure outlined in the act, the LIS will iterate and transition into international surety standard in performance of its required immigration duties.”The passage of the two acts comes at a time when there are calls for the capitalization of the national security apparatus to avert any terrorist attack within the territorial confines of Liberia after the recent terrorist attack on a resort in neighboring La Cote d’Ivoire which left over a dozen killed.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more


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first_imgArcata >> At this point, with their postseason fate hanging in the balance, the Jacks will take wins any way they can get them.That was proven true Saturday night.Junior point guard Malik Morgan scored a game-high 22 points and sophomore guard Nikhil Lizotte added 21 to lead the Humboldt State men’s basketball team to a hard-fought 71-60 win over California Collegiate Athletic Association rival and previously red-hot Cal Poly Pomona at Lumberjack Arena.“I think the most that (this win) does …last_img


Tag: 爱上海419新的连接

first_imgPlanned for a site about 30 miles west of Philadelphia, Three Groves Ecovillage will add to the uptick in cohousing communities that have embraced energy efficiency and other green building goals.As currently designed, Three Groves will include solar thermal and photovoltaic systems with enough capacity to allow the community to operate at net zero energy. Its site management, construction, and materials strategies, meanwhile, are aimed at earning the project LEED for Homes Platinum certification.Cohousing has so far found its way to 38 states, according to the Cohousing Association of the United States, whose directory lists almost 250 cohousing projects in the U.S. Eight of those projects are in Pennsylvania. And though not all ecovillages adopt the characteristics of cohousing communities (such as a resident-directed site plan that clusters residences around a common house), many cohousing communities have embraced ecovillage concepts of environmental stewardship, which typically include energy-efficient housing and renewable-energy systems.Ecovillage and cohousing compatibility Abundance EcoVillage, a community of 14 homes on 15 acres in Fairfield, Iowa, for example, is not a cohousing development, although the homeowners there do share the cost of maintaining the community’s renewable-energy systems – two wind turbines (one with a capacity of 3 kW, the other with a 5 kW potential output), and a 7-kW photovoltaic array.Meanwhile, EcoVillage at Ithaca, in upstate New York, is a true cohousing community of 60 units whose planned third neighborhood, a 40-unit project, is expected to include about 25 homes built to the Passivhaus standard.Three Groves Ecovillage homes, nine of which have been sold so far, will range in size from 1,193 square feet for a one-bedroom home to 1,965 square feet for a four-bedroom home, with prices ranging from about $200,000 to the low $400,000s. Monthly housing costs – including mortgage, taxes, and energy costs – are expected to average $1,752.We’ve asked Three Groves for details about the insulation and expected airtightness of the units and will include that information when it becomes available.last_img read more


Tag: 爱上海419新的连接

first_imgEditor’s note: This is one in a series of blogs detailing the construction of a net-zero-energy house in Point Roberts, Washington, by an owner-builder with relatively little building experience. A list of Matt Bath’s GBA articles can be found at the bottom of this page. You’ll find Matt Bath’s full blog, Saving Sustainably, here. If you want to follow project costs, you can keep an eye on a budget worksheet here. After passing the insulation inspection, I had permission to enclose the walls. I used gypsum drywall, the most common interior wall-covering product on the market. Drywall, best known by brand names such as Sheetrock, consists mainly of gypsum pressed between two thick sheets of paper. It is very easy to install and paint, is fire resistant, and finds a good balance between strength and flexibility. It is also an excellent tool for saving sustainably as it is relatively inexpensive and also 100% recyclable.RELATED ARTICLESDrywall Finishing Tips for Owner-BuildersHow to Hang Airtight DrywallBeazer’s Settlement Over Chinese Drywall I’ve learned a few lessons over the course of building my own home. One of them is that a good tool will almost always pay for itself in saved time and headache. I bought a few tools to help make installation easier and I highly recommend them to someone doing a project of this size. The first is a drywall screw gun. Each sheet of drywall takes at least 30 screws and I had more than 150 sheets to install. That’s more than 4500 screws! With a drywall screw gun you can just turn it on so it is always running. That way you can focus your attention on your left hand and getting the next screw ready. It also has a depth setting to ensure that screws are set to the correct depth without tearing the paper. Like most tools, it takes some practice to really get the hang of it but once I’d hung the first 50 sheets or so I really started to get faster. The second tool is a cutout tool, also known by the brand name RotoZip. It also takes some getting used to, but after using it for a while you really start to get quick with it. The tool uses a special bit that will follow along any solid surface, so you can use it to cut out window openings and electrical boxes, or just install end of wall sections long and use it to cut off the excess. It works very quickly and saves a ton of time. With more than 150 sheets of drywall to install, buying two specialized tools was well worth the money. Where possible, I used drywall clips instead of adding wood framing to support the drywall. On exterior walls, using clips allowed more room in the stud bays for insulation. They also were very handy on interior walls. There were many places where I would have needed to add an additional piece of wood to attach the drywall; it was much easier to screw in a clip. Using drywall clips instead of framing lumber made odd corners easier to assemble. In exterior walls, clips helped make room for additional insulation. Clips were especially handy as backing where I had a 45° wall intersection, as I would have otherwise had to bevel the edge of a stud. The beauty of drywall is that you really don’t need a lot of tools and you don’t need a lot of precision, either. The joint compound I will be applying next will easily cover up any gaps in the drywall. Resilient channel reduces noise Normally, drywall is installed on the ceiling first followed by the upper half of the wall, then the lower half of the wall. I had already installed the second-floor ceiling, but I still needed to install the ceiling for the first floor. To reduce the noise from footsteps upstairs I hung the drywall from  resilient channel attached to the bottom of the floor joists. Resilient channel installed between second-floor joists and the drywall will reduce sound traveling through the floor. Resilient channel is a strip of metal that works to decouple sound vibrations between building materials. If I installed the drywall directly to the floor joists, the vibrations from footsteps and the washer and dryer and water heater would carry straight through the floor to the joists and straight through to the drywall. The resilient channel breaks this direct path. It is screwed to the floor joists, and then the drywall is screwed to the resilient channel, which is especially designed to eliminate contact between the two materials. I installed the channel perpendicular to the floor joists every 16 in. I used a 14-in.-long block to help me space the channel as I put it up with drywall screws. It is crucial to make sure that all of the screws going through the drywall penetrate only the resilient channel, not the floor joists. The channel is easy to trim to size with metal snips, and pieces can overlap to create a splice. The installation was very quick and easy. Tackling exterior walls I hung drywall on the exterior walls next. If you recall, I had left a 3/4-in. gap wherever an interior partition wall met an exterior wall, and then installed ladder framing in the exterior wall. This makes both air-sealing and drywall installation easier. I could easily slide a 1/2-in.-thick sheet of drywall through the 3/4-in. gap. Top and bottom plates of interior partitions are held 3/4 in. away from the exterior wall, allowing drywall to slip in place without being cut at the intersection. Ladder framing in the exterior wall (visible behind the insulation netting) will support the last stud. Next, I added in the final stud and nailed it to both the ladder framing and the top and bottom plates. Now it was ready for the installation of the interior walls. The last wall stud can then be nailed into place. Dealing with arches and curves Hanging drywall on interior walls was slightly more complex because there were curves, arches, and niches to deal with. That’s the great thing about building your own home, though. You get to include all of the beautiful, custom features that you have always wanted. I designed the house to have a curved wall to wrap around a spiral staircase, as the photo below shows. This should be one of the more aesthetically pleasing elements of the house. But it was a bit of a pain, not only to frame but also when it came time to hang drywall on the ceiling and the walls. Drywall destined for a curved wall in the stairwell had to be scored to make the bend. Convex surfaces required dampening the back of the sheet as well as scoring. Drywall does bend, but not enough to make this radius. In order to make it work, I started by scoring the back of the sheet every 1-1/2 in. Next, I sprayed the back liberally with water, working it into the scored areas especially. The moisture dampens the gypsum, allowing it to flex more. I wrapped it around the wall and pulled it tight with clamps, and then left it to dry. A few hours later I was able to remove the clamps and the curve remained. At this point I was able to lift it into place on the wall and attach it with drywall screws. The arches I designed to cover the ductwork are created the same way, but the drywall didn’t require water because it was being bent away from the back side of the sheet instead of toward it (concave curves as opposed to convex). The gypsum snaps at each of the scored lines, but the paper on front remains intact, allowing the sheet to form into a curve. The important thing is to ensure all of the screws are put into the gypsum, not just the paper. The large curved wall that wraps around the spiral staircase also had this type of curve where the drywall is bent away from the back side. I created these in the same manner. Hanging these sheets was complicated by the fact that they were installed in the stairwell. For smaller drywall arches, I used 1/4-in.-thick sheets. Then comes the mud When you look at a long wall in a modern building, it looks to be one single piece of painted, textured drywall. In reality, any long wall is made up of several different sheets of drywall. Taping is the part that makes it all look seamless. Ready-mix joint compound like the kind I am using is made primarily of limestone and water, mixed with other additives like talcum (baby powder) and perlite (volcanic glass). Even though it is called ready-mix, it is highly recommended to add a couple handfuls of water and mix it really well with a drill-mounted mixing paddle before applying it. Some joint compounds contain plaster of Paris, which hardens a lot faster. It’s a good idea that before doing any taping you take some of this “hot mud,” as the pros call it, and fill any large gaps, especially in corners or inside edges. The hot mud comes in a powder form, and you simply add water and mix it up until it has a workable consistency. I used a 6-in. taping knife to apply the hot mud to any gaps over 1/8 in. wide. Before applying any drywall compound or tape, make sure that screwheads do not protrude above the paper. The other thing you need to do before you begin drywall taping is to make sure that all of the screws sit just below the surface of the drywall. I took my taping knife and ran it over each screw and if I heard a click, I knew it was sticking out and would interfere with the tape. I gave these screws a quarter turn or so until they were below the surface of the drywall. If you used a drywall screwgun like I did, there shouldn’t be too many of these to deal with. Start taping in the corners With the gaps filled and screws set, I was now ready to start taping. Starting in the corners, I loaded up my hawk with joint compound and used my 6-in. taping knife to butter up both sides of a corner. It’s best to load up only the front edge of the knife with mud and then hold the knife sideways to apply it so you end up with just a 3-in.- to 4-in.-wide streak of mud on the wall. You definitely don’t need a 6-in.-wide bead of mud, and that’s what you’ll get if you simply run the front edge of the knife down the wall vertically. As with many, many other skills used in building a house, it will take some practice to get the hang of using the side of the knife smoothly, but if you just keep trying you can become pretty skillful rather quickly. Use a 6-in. taping knife held sideways to apply joint compound in a corner. Follow this by removing excess mud with the knife held straight. I measured a piece of tape to fit the corner from top to bottom and folded it in half along the crease, then applied it to the corner. I removed the excess mud by holding the taping knife straight. It is best to start from the bottom and go up to avoid excessive dripping. Drywall paper tape must be mudded on both sides, so I then repeated the process to get the front side of the tape, applying the mud with the knife sideways and removing it with the knife held straight. I taped the flats next. The long edges of drywall sheets are tapered so when you have two of these long edges together, they create a tiny ditch. The tape fits inside this ditch so that after you are done taping you are left with a flat surface. As with the corners, the flats are buttered up, the tape is applied and flattened out, the tape is buttered, and then the knife removes all of the excess mud. When the tape is applied, it should not overlap the corner tape that was already applied. The last seam to tape is the butt joints. These are the places where the short edges of the drywall sheets come together. Unfortunately, they are not tapered. This means that the tape will sit on top of the drywall and create a hump. With several coats of joint compound, I widened this hump so it was so gradual that I couldn’t tell it was there. Drywall taping goes a lot faster when you use less mud rather than apply a ton of mud and then have to sand off all the excess. In addition, joint compound should be applied over the heads of all the screws. You can hit a row of them in just two swipes of the taping knife by applying mud holding the knife sideways in one stroke, and then rotating the knife straight to wipe the excess mud off with the front of the knife. A big thank you to DIY RenoVision for their excellent videos that really helped out! Other blogs by Matt Bath: An Introduction Foundation Formwork Designing and Installing a Septic System Pouring the Slab Framing the First Floor Framing the Second Floor Framing the Roof Shingling the Roof Wall Sheathing Installing Drains and Vents Plumbing Rough-In Completing the Dry-In Electrical Rough-In Installing the Ventilation System Installing Trim and Siding Air Sealing and Insulationlast_img read more


Tag: 爱上海419新的连接

first_img You will still need to do what sales people have always done. Make contact. Create opportunity. Create value. And make the sale. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now No one is waiting for your cold call. No one has ever said to themselves upon awakening, “Man, I hope some salesperson calls me out of the blue today.” The chances of the words being uttered at any time in the future are precisely 0.0%.Nor is there anyone demanding that you social sell them, either.Buyers are not hoping that you to send them an invitation on LinkedIn and follow it up by hammering them with an appointment request a half millisecond later. They don’t hope for a completely self-oriented email that creates no value for them. There isn’t anything here that makes this approach inherently better than a phone call.No buyer is waiting for you to tweet them, nor are they waiting for a direct message. No one is waiting to engage with you on Twitter. No one is begging for you to share links with them, or hoping that you be patient while they come to realize that all of your sharing on social media means that you are someone who can help them with their challenges or opportunities.If you’re going to be a thought leader, you are going to need compelling content. If you are going to use social tools to build your personal brand and create new opportunities, you are going to have to go deep, creating content that distinguishes you within your space. If you are going to curate or synthesize other people’s content, you are going to have to add something meaningful, some point of view that is valuable, something that makes your thought leadership stand out.No one is demanding that you social sell them, because no is demanding that you sell them at all.Because social selling doesn’t actually happen. Customers won’t discover you via your social efforts and sign up. Your social activity can create awareness of you and what you represent, but it doesn’t change what actually must occur for you to sell.last_img read more