Governor Wolf Announces Prison Inmate Population Drops for Fourth Consecutive Year After Record Reduction

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first_img January 22, 2018 Efficiency,  Press Release,  Prison Reform,  Public Safety Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf announced today that the number of inmates in the Pennsylvania state prison system dropped for the fourth consecutive calendar year, according to new statistics released by the Department of Corrections (DOC).In 2017, the total DOC inmate population dropped from 49,301 to 48,438, a decrease of 863 inmates or 1.8 percent over 2016.“The 2017 calendar year reduction represents the single largest year-over-year decrease of inmate population on record,” Governor Wolf said. “I am pleased that our efforts and initiatives are making a measurable difference in improving our prison population numbers, while reducing crime, supporting those reentering our communities, and lowering costs.”After decades of growth that more than doubled the number of prisons in Pennsylvania, the inmate population has declined by 6.4 percent, or 3,319 inmates, since June 2012, allowing for the 2017 closure of SCI Pittsburgh and accompanying significant cost savings.“This latest reduction in the inmate population, combined with the crime rate decline, indicates that a broad range of bi-partisan criminal justice initiatives being undertaken across Pennsylvania are working for our citizens,” said Corrections Secretary John Wetzel. “We believe further reductions in the inmate population, lower agency costs and decreases in the crime rate, are possible moving forward as part of the consolidation with the Board of Probation and Parole and the second round of the Justice Reinvestment Initiative.”Wetzel said legislation proposed under the initiative would also expand victims’ rights to require police officers to provide victim services information at the scene of a crime, require prosecutors to notify the Victim Advocate on behalf of personal injury crime victims and increase compensation for crime victims.In the decade before the first Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI) began in 2012, the DOC population was increasing by an average of 1,262 inmates per year. The Justice Reinvestment Initiative is aimed at reducing the prison population through criminal justice reform and directing the savings to help counties enhance public safety which also further sustains prison population reductions.Better coordination between the Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole and DOC has played a key role in driving the reduction, along with the invalidation by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in 2015 of many mandatory minimum sentencing penalties, said Bret Bucklen, the department’s director of planning, research, and statistics.Luis Rosa, deputy secretary of reentry, credited interagency cooperation and said technology has improved parole processes.“The use of electronic information sharing, enhances our abilities to apply data driven, outcome focused principles, which are the centerpiece of evidence based practice applications,” said Rosa. “Not only was the prison population reduced, but our case management quality was improved through the use of staff reentry trainings.”Christian Stephens, deputy secretary of field supervision, said several recent initiatives have allowed field operations to safely increase the number of reentrants it can manage leading to more efficient and expedited release process.“We are utilizing proven evidence-based practices, which preserve public safety, such as lowering the caseload ratios by hiring over 150 new agents in the past 18 months, increasing use of GPS, and fully implementing the use of the contact report, which assists our agents in the prioritization of their work,” said Stephens.Among the legislative proposals under the second phase of Justice Reinvestment Initiative (JRI2) are the introduction of “presumptive parole,” where short-term, non-violent offenders are automatically paroled upon completion of their minimum sentence, the expansion of the State Intermediate Punishment (SIP) program, which offers shorter sentences for drug offenders, combined with substance use disorder treatment and enacting a short sanctioning option for technical parole violators, such as the Swift, Certain, and Fair (SCF) approach.The main driver of the population decrease in 2017 was a large reduction in parole violator admissions, which dropped by 10.2 percent in 2017, said Bucklen. And further inmate population reductions and additional cost savings are possible if the continued reforms are implemented.“If we move forward with these proposals, we are projecting a reduction of another roughly 2,500 inmates over the next 5 years, and a cost savings of approximately $91.7 million,” said Bucklen. Governor Wolf Announces Prison Inmate Population Drops for Fourth Consecutive Year After Record Reductioncenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more


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first_imgJackson, Clayton M29Wellington, KS114 W 12th St, Wellington, KSSumner CoWarrant Arrest10/22/15         Belle Plaine PD2 Cuellar, Leonardo R28Belle Plaine, KS523 W 8th, Belle Plaine, KSBelle Plaine PDWarrant Arrest10/24/15 KRGC Dalborn, Dale M35Conway Springs, KSSedgwick County Jail, Wichita, KSSedgwick CoProbation Violation10/19/15 Leyva-Sanchez, Jamie42Wellington, KSSumner and Main, Oxford, KSOxford PDDriving under influence of alcohol or drugs, Operate a motor vehicle without a valid license10/25/15 Follow us on Twitter. Wilson, Krystal L25Caldwell, KS610 E Hillside, Wellington, KSSumner CoProbation Violation10/19/15 Fisk-James, Amanda K32Wichita, KSSedgwick County Jail, Wichita, KSSedgwick CoProbation Violation10/20/15 Acotto, Carmen A Jr45Wellington, KS501 N Washington, Wellington, KSSumner CoProbation Violation10/20/15 Parker, Clayton L29Wellington, KS1402 E Michigan C, Wellington, KSWellington PDDomestic Battery10/24/15 Sumner Co15 Wood, Terry W36Wichita, KSCowley County Jail, Winfield, KSSumner CoProbation Violation10/20/15 Turcotte, Daniel J Jr25Mulvane, KS501 N Washington, Wellington, KSSumner CoProbation Violation10/19/15 Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! 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Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments NameAgeHome TownArrest locationAgencyChargesArrest date Scudder, Ruthanne D39Winfield, KS2000 E 16th St, Wellington, KSSumner CoPossession of certain stimulant, Possession of drug paraphernailia10/22/15 Olson, Ryan A18Wellington, KS610 E Hillside, Wellington, KSSumner CoServing Sentence10/23/15 Conway Springs PD Hurley, Derek E21Wichita, KS400 N Logan, Belle Plaine, KSBelle Plaine PDWarrant Arrest10/25/15 KHP3 Galindo, Jose A28Wichita, KS1300 N K-15, Mulvane, KSSumner CoDriving while license suspended10/20/15 Stewart, Brandon L26Belle Plaine, KS4th and Line, Belle Plaine, KSSumner CoDriving under influence of alcohol or drugs, Transporting an open container10/24/15 Newkirk, Shanin M47St. Joesph, MOKTA I-35 MP 32, Mulvane, KSKHPGiving a worthless check10/22/15 Robinson, Rosaline L49Wichita, KS1400 N US-81, Mulvane, KSSumner CoDriving while license suspended10/22/15 Bowers, James J35Wichita, KS777 Kansas Star Dr, Mulvane, KSMulvane PDWarrant Arrest10/24/15 Mulvane PD3 Justus, Chelina M35Edmond, OK777 Kansas Star Dr, Mulvane, KSMulvane PDWarrant Arrest, Possession of certain stimulant, Unlawful use of driver’s license10/24/15 Sanchez, Gilberto Jr27Wichita, KSSedgwick County Jail, Wichita, KSSedgwick CoFailure to Appear10/19/15 King, Jessica L24Wellington, KS523 W Lincoln, Wellington, KSWellington PDDomestic Battery10/23/15 Barber Co Hampton, Mike42Wichita, KSKTA I-35 MP 28, Mulvane, KSKHPDriving under influence of alcohol or drugs10/25/15 Vazquez, Antonio56Wichita, KS610 E Hillside, Wellington, KSSumner CoServing Sentence10/19/15 Mosher, Nancy L42Argonia, KS214 W Walnut, Argonia, KSSumner CoGiving a worthless check, Arrest by LEO10/25/15 Gingerich, Tremain D20Wellington, KS800 S Washington Wellington KS 67152Sumner CoPossession of para w/intent to manufacture controlled substance, Possession of opiate ,  and a Probation Violation Rufe, Jacob J19Wichita, KS600 W Bridge St, Mulvane, KSMulvane PDDriving under influence of alcohol or drugs10/24/15 Sedgwick Co50 Total78 Wellington PD3 Bookings Fisher, Kenneth P58Wichita, KSKTA I-35 Plaza 33, Mulvane, KSKHPDriving under influence of alcohol or drugs, Transporting an open container10/24/15 Mefford, Robert K51Wellington, KS2004 N Madison, Wellington, KSWellington PDDomestic Battery10/23/15 Hiten, Joshua T33Oxford, KS507 N Osage, Oxford, KSOxford PDDomestic Battery, Disorderly conduct10/25/15 Bail Bondsman Oxford PD2 Melton, Brian L22Mulvane, KS501 N Washington, Wellington, KSSumner CoProbation Violation10/20/15 Russell, Aaron S21Wellington, KS610 E Hillside, Wellington, KSSumner CoServing Sentence10/23/15 Sumner Newscow report — The Sumner County Sheriff Office report for Oct. 19 to Oct. 26, 2015 weekly jail bookings are as follows:  Monday 0600  to  Monday 0600  WEEKLY   BOOKINGS 10/19/2015 thru 10/26/2015  Pfister, Gary L49Anthony, KSEl Dorado Correctional Facility, El Dorado, KSSumner CoProbation Violation10/23/15last_img read more


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first_img23 March 2015The government is urging South Africans to use Human Rights month as a vehicle to foster social cohesion, nation building, national identity socioeconomic developement – as well as an end to xenophobia and homophobia, Justice and Correctional Minister Michael Masutha said at an official event held to commemorate Human Rights Day in Uitenhage on Saturday.Masutha urged communities to stop looting shops owned by foreign nationals: “We need to root out the new habit of looting shops owned by immigrants. These shops render services to the very communities that end up looting and destorying them.”He encouraged people to report complaints about illegal activities in immigrant communities to their councillors or to the police. “Don’t vent out your grievances by looting shops and destorying property,” Masutha said.Addressing the crowd at Rosedale Field in Uitenhage in the Eastern Cape, Masutha paid tribute to those who died in massacre that took place there 30 years ago.On 21 March 1985, 28 people were shot dead by police in Langa, a township on the outskirts of Uitenhage. The demonstrators had gathered to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Sharpeville massacre.Mashuta said 21 March was now a day to reaffirm the rights of all the people of South Africa. This year’s theme is “Celebrating the Freedom Charter, enjoying Equal Human Rights for All”.“We should go back to the tradition of caring for each other’s children and young people. We should go back to the traditon of caring for each other’s aged grannies,” the minister said.SAnews.gov.za and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more


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first_imgThe doping scandal has taken a dangerous turn. A former SAI doctor, who exposed how doping was rampant at National Institute of Sports, has been beaten up at Patiala. Dr Sajib Nandi had recently revealed to Headlines Today how the authorities at NIS Patiala were hand in glove in the doping scandal. Nandi was beaten up at the entrance of NIS Patiala and dragged out of the campus by the security guards as he was set to meet Justice Mudgal, who is probing the doping scam. Nandi told Headlines Today, “I’m filing report with the police shortly. The NIS director is a corrupt person.” Unfortunately, this is not the first time that Nandi has been attacked in his attempt to cleanse the system. Back in 2002 too, he was beaten up as he tried to expose the authorities’ role and involvement in doping at Patiala. Recently, Punjab deputy chief minister Sukhbir singh Badal has taken action on the chemist shops in Patiala selling banned drugs. While raids were conducted on the shops, the state government was getting ready to cancel licences of all those found guilty of selling banned drugs. On July 5, Headlines Today had exposed how performance enhancing drugs were openly sold over the counter at chemist shops around NIS in Patiala. The expose had come amid the dope stink involving eight athletes, including golden girl Ashwini Akkunji. Headlines Today special investigation team went shopping and found no checks in place here to control the sale of banned drugs. NIS Patiala has a tarnished history dating back to 2001, when syringes and steroid strips were found in its hostels. An inquiry was ordered into the functioning of NIS by the Sports Authority of India in 2003.  Though no action has yet been taken, the report is believed to contain proof of sustained irregularities in anti-doping procedures and a nexus between NIS authorities, federation coaches and SAI officers.advertisementlast_img read more


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first_imgTV 2 is making its channels available on Danish cable operator Stofa’s WebTV To Go multiscreen service.The broadcaster has signed a two year deal with Stofa to bring its channels to the platform until the end of 2013. They will be available on PCs, tablets and smartphones in Denmark free-of-charge until the end of the year. From next year, users will be charged an as yet undisclosed fee to access the channels.last_img


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In this April 2, 2018 photo fifth-generation dairy farmer Mary Mackinson Faber fits a Moocall device on the tail of a pregnant dairy cow at her farm in Pontiac, Ill. The device monitors the cow’s movements and will trigger a text message to announce that the cow is about to give birth. Today’s cows are getting an upgrade and the marriage of two technologies, motion sensors and artificial intelligence, is making mass-scale farming more efficient. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford) Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Moo-ving out: Sensor sends text alerts from cows in labor Is the world ready for cows armed with artificial intelligence? In this April 2, 2018 photo a Moocall device is seen on the tail of a pregnant dairy cow at the Mackinson Dairy Farm in Pontiac, Ill. The device monitors the cow’s movements and will trigger a text message to announce that the cow is about to give birth. Today’s cows are getting an upgrade and the marriage of two technologies, motion sensors and artificial intelligence, is making mass-scale farming more efficient. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford) TensorFlow has been used to do everything from helping NASA scientists find planets using the Kepler telescope, to assisting a tribe in the Amazon detect the sounds of illegal deforestation, according to Google spokesman Justin Burr.Google hopes users adapt the open-source code to discover new applications that the company could someday use in its own business.Even without AI, sensors are helping farmers keep tabs on their herds.Mary Mackinson Faber, a fifth-generation farmer at the Mackinson Dairy Farm near Pontiac, Illinois, says a device attached to a cow’s tail developed by Irish company Moocall sends her a text when a cow is ready to give birth, so she can be there to make sure nothing goes wrong. Moocall doesn’t use AI—it simply sends a text when a certain threshold of spinal contractions in the tail are exceeded.While she calls it a “great tool,” she says it takes human intuition to do what’s right for their animals.”There are certain tasks that it can help with, and it can assist us, but I don’t think it will ever replace the human.” Underlying IDA is Google’s open-source TensorFlow programming framework, which has helped spread AI to many disciplines. It’s a language built on top of the commonly used Python code that helps connect data from text, images, audio or sensors to neural networks—the algorithms that help computers learn. The language has been downloaded millions of times and has about 1,400 people contributing code, only 400 of whom work at Google, according to product manager Sandeep Gupta.He says TensorFlow can be used by people with only high-school level math and some programming skills.”We’re continuing this journey making it easier and easier to use,” Gupta says. Citation: Bovines online: Farmers are using AI to help monitor cows (2018, April 13) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-bovines-online-farmers-ai-cows.html “If we can prove out that these advantages exist from using this technology … I think adoption of IDA across a broad range of farming systems, particularly large farming systems, would be a no-brainer,” Watson says.Dairy farming is just one industry benefiting from AI, which is being applied in fields as diverse as journalism, manufacturing and self-driving cars. In agriculture, AI is being developed to estimate crop health using drone footage and parse out weed killer between rows of cotton.Yasir Khokhar, the former Microsoft employee who is the founder and CEO of Connecterra, said the inspiration for the idea came after living on a dairy farm south of Amsterdam.”It turns out the technology farmers use is really outdated in many respects,” he says. “What does exist is very cumbersome to use, yet agriculture is one of those areas that desperately needs technology.” © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. No time to ruminate on that because the moment has arrived, thanks to a Dutch company that has married two technologies—motion sensors and AI—with the aim of bringing the barnyard into the 21st century.The company, Connecterra, has brought its IDA system , or “The Intelligent Dairy Farmer’s Assistant,” to the United States after having piloted it in Europe for several years.IDA uses a motion-sensing device attached to a cow’s neck to transmit its movements to a program driven by AI. The sensor data, when aligned repeatedly with real-world behavior, eventually allows IDA to tell from data alone when a cow is chewing cud, lying down, walking, drinking or eating.Those indicators can predict whether a particular cow is ill, has become less productive, or is ready to breed—alerting the farmer to changes in behavior that might otherwise be easily missed.”It would just be impossible for us to keep up with every animal on an individual basis,” says Richard Watson, one of the first four U.S. farmers to use IDA since it launched commercially in December.Watson, who owns the Seven Oaks Dairy in Waynesboro, Georgia, says having a computer identify which cows in his 2,000-head herd need attention could help improve farm productivity as much as 10 percent, which would mean hundreds of thousands of dollars to his family. In this March 28, 2018, image made from a video, a cow stands in a pasture on Seven Oaks Dairy in Waynesboro, Ga. On the cow’s neck is a device called IDA, or “The Intelligent Dairy Farmer’s Assistant,” created by Connecterra. It uses a motion-sensing device attached to a cow’s neck to transmit its movements to a program driven by artificial intelligence. (AP Photo/Marina Hutchinson) read more


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first_img Image Gallery: How Technology Reveals Hidden Art Treasures In Photos: Ireland’s Newgrange Passage Tomb and Henge Archaeologist Sarah Parcak studies lost cities of the ancient world. But unlike the fictional archaeologist Indiana Jones — and generations of real-world archaeologists — Parcak peers at temples, pyramids and other remnants of the distant past from great heights, scanning the ground with satellite technology orbiting at altitudes thousands of miles above Earth. A pioneer in this relatively new field of so-called space archaeology, Parcak shares some of her biggest discoveries in a new memoir, “Archaeology From Space.” Her book outlines how aerial views have transformed her field, revealing hundreds of sites that were previously unknown. The lives of people from millennia ago still have much to teach us, and new methods for studying the past — particularly civilizations that succumbed to a changing climate — can uncover important lessons for humanity’s future. Below is an excerpt of “Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past,” published by Henry Holt and Company on July 9, 2019. Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65868-archaeology-from-space-excerpt.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  The Scope of Space Archaeology The human story—the story of us—is evolving at breakneck speed thanks to new technologies. Armed with new data sets, we can spin fresh tales that bring us closer to getting more right than wrong about our ancestors and ourselves. What we can find with new technologies such as satellite imagery is simply astounding. It is helping us rewrite history. We’ve gone from mapping a few dozen ancient sites in one summer-long archaeological season to mapping hundreds, if not thousands, of sites in weeks. With advances in computing and artificial intelligence, we are on the verge of achieving those same results in a few hours. In case you want to be an archaeologist and are worried that we space archaeologists will find everything first, fear not. Knowing the location of an ancient site is only the first step. We still have to survey sites on the ground, a process known as ground-truthing, and then undertake years of excavation to get a better understanding of what is there. And wow, do we have a lot of work to do. To give you a sense of just how much, and how quickly this field is advancing, I saved writing this introduction until last, to make sure to include any hot-off-the-press discoveries made with satellite technologies. With the chapters done and edited, I thought I could get away with a bit of downtime between big announcements. Dream on, Parcak. In a recent Nature publication, a team led by archaeologist Jonas Gregorio de Souza announced 81 previously unknown pre-Columbian sites in the Amazon basin area of Brazil, using satellite imagery and ground surveys. Based on their findings, they estimated 1,300 other sites dating to between 1250 and 1500 AD in just 7 percent of the Amazon basin, with potentially more than 18,000 others in total. More than a million people may have lived in areas that today seem largely inhospitable. Their findings included ceremonial centers, large platform mounds, ringed villages, and fortified settlements in north-central Brazil’s upper Tapajós Basin, where few archaeologists had ventured.3 To me, what is extraordinary about this discovery is just how much archaeologists and others had taken for granted about what might, or might not, be there in the rainforest. Satellite data allowed the archaeological team to search large areas in a matter of months, when the job would have taken decades on the ground. All this, from a subfield that barely existed 20 years ago. Although the world is learning more, there’s still a way to go in popular understanding. In a recent travel insurance application for my work abroad, I was quoted an insanely high price for one year of coverage, over $50,000. When I inquired why, the team admitted they thought I traveled into space to look down from the actual satellites for ruins. I’m still laughing. As I write this, I am downloading brand-new satellite imagery of Giza, in Egypt, the site of the last standing wonder of the ancient world. Who knows if I’ll find anything previously undiscovered there. The main thing I have learned is to expect the unexpected. New sites and features appear where you hadn’t previously thought to look, or, in cases like Giza, have the potential to overturn long-held assumptions about major sites and time periods. In the following chapters, you’ll read about projects that did just that. Mapping sites from space is fun, but getting to explore them is what takes me back in time, often thousands of years, to eras when people believed in different gods, spoke languages now extinct, and lived in places assumed never to have been inhabited—but they were all Homo sapiens sapiens. Just like us. As such, archaeology has the potential to inspire in us great wonder, bringing us together. Today, given the conflicts and unrest around the world, this is very much needed. Some people don’t get the chance to experience that sense of awe in person at ancient sites, but I hope the stories shared here will give a sense not only of this, but of how much we assume about past peoples, and how wrong we have sometimes been, given our access to such fragmented information. There aren’t any papers published yet on whether remote sensing can complete the puzzle of what it means to be human and how to avoid the pitfalls of great civilizations that came before us. All I can say is that there is extraordinary wisdom to be learned from previous cultures. It’s shaped me profoundly and allows me to place current events in the long arc of perspective. For more than 300,000 years, our ancestors have migrated across Planet Earth, surviving and, in some cases, thriving—being creative, bold, innovative, and, of course, destructive. This story of space archaeology, its contributions to research, and the tales it helps us tell, only introduces the possibilities of the science. The scale of these new stories, however, should amaze and inspire us. In our history on Earth, humans have habitually pushed deeper into the unknown; as we now begin to focus on exploring Mars, and farther afield, we can imagine 100,000 years from today, when there will be literal space archaeologists traveling from planet to planet, exploring the remnants of our early settlement efforts in other galaxies. The origins of their field will be many light-years away, but the questions will remain close to those we ask today, about people who came before us. The answers matter far less than those questions. Perhaps it’s a start to understanding what makes us human: our ability to ask how, where, when, why, and who, and creating the tools we need to bring the answers to life, on Earth, looking down from outer space. 7 Amazing Places to Visit with Google Street View Originally published on Live Science.last_img read more


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first_imgAGARTALA: Two Rohingyas have been arrested from near the India-Bangladesh international border in Tripura, police said Tuesday. Acting on a tip-off, the police arrested 21-year-old Md. Salim and 20-year-old Jahangir Alam from Rajnagar area near here in West Tripura district on Monday, after locals claimed that two suspected Rohingya Muslims were roaming there. “It was found during preliminary investigation that they had entered Indian territory from Bangladesh in search of jobs,” officer-in-charge of Battala police station, Sahadeb Bhowmik, said. Refugee cards were recovered from their possession and they confessed of having stayed at a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh’s Chittagong area, he added. The duo would be produced at a local court Tuesday. Rohingyas use the Tripura corridor of the India- Bangladesh border to enter India from the neighbouring country, BSF officials said. In October 2017, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) had ordered all state governments to identify and monitor Rohingya refugees. It said the Centre viewed infiltration of Rohingyas from Rakhine state of Myanmar into Indian territory as a burden on the country’s resources and it aggravated security challenges to the country. Thousands of Rohingya Muslims, described by the UN as the most persecuted minority in the world, fled their homes in 2017 to escape an alleged crackdown by the Myanmar military. Download The Times of India News App for Latest India News.XStart your day smart with stories curated specially for youlast_img read more