CHRISTMAS ‘THANKS’ AS PERCY APPEAL RAISES MASSIVE €14,000

Tag: 夜上海论坛EB

first_imgDonegal County Childcare Committee staff Oran Sweeney and Avril McMonagle delivering gifts collected for the Percy Appeal to Anne McGettigan, Donegal Women’s Domestic Violence Service. Pic Clive WassonThe staff team at Donegal County Childcare are delighted to reveal the final tally on the Presents for Percy Appeal is a massive €14,000.All donations have been distributed within County Donegal to help a staggering 130 local families in need of a little help with meeting Santa requests for their children this Christmas.Avril McMonagle, Manager of DCCC said today: “The Presents for Percy Appeal was under pressure from the word go as the request lists from families more than doubled for Christmas 2012. “But the team upped their efforts and thanks to a range of individuals, agencies, local businesses and early childhood services the final tally also more than doubled the 2011 total.”Over the past week the DCCC team have purchased a range of toys and vouchers to match the Wishlists of 130 families and approximately 400 children.Due to unprecedented demand from parents, the appeal also purchased a range of vouchers for food and clothes that can be used in local stores.To ensure that all donations are targeted to those most in need of support, all purchases were distributed through local agencies all over the county including Parentstop, Cara House, Donegal Women’s Domestic Violence Service; Letterkenny Womens Centre, Action Inis Eoghain, St Vincent de Paul Falcarragh, Castlefinn, Stranorlar, Mountcharles, Clonmany, Killygordon, St Johnston Family Resource Centre and a number of individual parents and families who approached DCCC privately. DCCC would like to thank all those who supported the appeal – regardless of how large or small your donation it made a real difference, your efforts will ensure at least 400 smiles this Christmas morning! A public acknowledgement of all those who helped us out will feature in local press in the New Year. Percy with Donegal County Childcare Committee staff as they deliver gifts collected for the Percy Appeal to Pic Clive Wasson  CHRISTMAS ‘THANKS’ AS PERCY APPEAL RAISES MASSIVE €14,000 was last modified: December 19th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:000CHRISTMAS ‘THANKS’ AS PERCY APPEAL RAISES MASSIVE €14last_img read more


Tag: 夜上海论坛EB

first_imgGraduate training is seen as a crown jewel of U.S. higher education. University of Southern Mississippi/Van Arnold They probably should have known better, admits Harold Varmus, one of the authors of a controversial proposal this spring to correct the “systemic flaws” affecting U.S. biomedical research. But he and two of the other co-authors acknowledged Friday that one aspect of their call to arms was flawed, namely, that the community was close to agreeing on how to deal with the complex problems that affect training and funding. “We were naive,” said Varmus, director of the National Cancer Institute, after a presentation to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). “We were hoping to pick off some low-hanging fruit.”But that fruit isn’t ripe yet, he and Princeton University’s President Emerita Shirley Tilghman and Harvard Medical School’s Marc Kirschner told PCAST. The council had invited the four authors (Bruce Alberts, the former editor of Science, was unable to attend) because of the furor their article had raised within the biomedical community, explained PCAST Co-Chair Eric Lander.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Shortly after the article appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in April, a members-only session held on the last morning of the academy’s annual meeting generated a “very heated” discussion, Varmus said. A follow-up meeting of community leaders sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute convinced the authors that they were far from achieving the consensus they wanted before holding a national gathering to come up with a list of solutions.“So we’ve decided to take more time,” Varmus explained. He and others said the next step would be to assemble a larger and more representative group—in particular with early-career scientists—to continue discussing the issues, which cover everything from graduate training and university oversight of research to federal grants management and partnerships with industry.The system has worked well for a long time, Tilghman explained, and nobody wants to do something that might have unintended negative consequences. “We are very sensitive to the principle of ‘First, do no harm.’ ”Put succinctly, Tilghman described the problem as “too many people chasing too little money.” And after the trio presented their views on what factors are putting stress on the system and what might be done to alleviate it, Lander, a biologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, got to the heart of the matter.“You’ve suggested a lot of reasons for the current situation,” he said. But in the absence of hard evidence to back up their assertions, he noted, it’s very difficult to know which remedies might solve the problem and which might make it worse.“That’s exactly the question that I would have asked us,” Tilghman confessed. “There’s a consensus that the current system is at risk for not producing the best science. But there’s little consensus on what to do to make it better.”One reason, Lander hinted, may be the large number of unproven—and possibly untestable—hypotheses about the crisis that have become accepted wisdom. The article asserted, for example, that the current “hypercompetitive system” is driving away the best students and “making it difficult for seasoned investigators to produce their best work.” The article also stated that low success rates have spawned “conservative, short-term thinking” throughout the community, a problem compounded, the authors say, by the fact that “time for reflection is a disappearing luxury.”Another hugely controversial issue is whether some type of “birth control” is needed to ease the intense competition for research funding and academic positions. The phrase usually applies to limiting the number of graduate students. But biologist Jo Handelsman, associate director for science at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and a participant at the Hughes meeting, said that emphasis may be inappropriate.“I think that graduate education is the pinnacle of what we do in education in the United States,” said Handelsman, on leave from Yale University. “And I don’t think there’s anything wrong with unleashing a large group of trained Ph.D.s. The question is what they do after graduation.”Her suggestion: Make sure that universities “train students just as rigorously” for careers outside academia as is now done to prepare them for academic careers. “The answer is not limiting the number of graduate students, but perhaps limiting the number of PIs,” Handelsman remarked after the meeting.Although nothing was resolved during the 75-minute discussion, one of Tilghman’s comments midway through it captured the tenor. “We don’t know what to do, and we’re open to your suggestions,” she said. “But I do know one thing: If we go home and do nothing, the problem will just get worse.”last_img read more