NBA Mock Draft: Lakers to select Brandon Ingram at No. 2

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first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error 2. LakersBrandon Ingram, Duke, small forward, 6-9, 190NBA talent evaluators have fallen in love with Ingram’s defense, outside shot and positional versatility. So much so that NBA TV analyst Grant Hill called Ingram a “poor-man’s Kevin Durant.” But can Ingram follow Durant’s path and strengthen his rail-thin frame?3. Boston CelticsJamal Murray, Kentucky, shooting guard, 6-4, 205The Celtics will shop their No.3 pick, though a deal appears unlikely. NBA talent evaluators like Murray’s versatility as a combo guard. But he could prove more valuable as a shooter because of the Celtics’ flooded backcourt and their need for outside shooting. 4. Phoenix SunsDragan Bender, Israel, power forward, 7-1, 220Questions linger on how long it will take for Bender to develop after not appearing in major international competition since 2014. But he has enough post moves and feel for the game, that plenty think he will excel soon. 5. Minnesota TimberwolvesBuddy Hield, Oklahoma, shooting guard, 6-4, 215One NBA scout argued Hield is the most seasoned college prospect because of his four-year collegiate experience, sharpshooting and ability to finish at the rim. The only question mark entails how much Hield can thrive in other areas of his game. 6. New Orleans PelicansKris Dunn, Providence, point guard, 6-9, 196NBA talent evaluators like Dunn’s steady presence and defense at the point guard spot. He might be just what Pelicans forward Anthony Davis needs to create an unstoppable 1-2 punch. 7. Denver NuggetsMarquese Chriss, Washington, power forward, 6-9, 235Chriss climbed up most draft boards because of his athleticism and an emerging post game, with the ability to play above the rim and make jumpers. Chriss still faces concerns about his lack of rebounding. 8. Sacramento KingsJaylen Brown, Cal, shooting guard/small forward, 6-6, 225One NBA scout gushed about Brown’s “elite athleticism” and his ability to finish at the rim. But a few NBA executives are worried about Brown’s outside shot. 9. Toronto RaptorsJakob Poeltl, Utah, center, 7-0, 235Poeltl stayed an extra season so he could dominate as both a post player and jump shooter. Poeltl has modeled his game after Pau Gasol and is arguably this draft class’ best big man. 10. Milwaukee BucksHenry Ellenson, Marquette, power forward, center, 6-10, 230Ellenson made strong impressions in pre-draft workouts because of his confidence and ability to play the stretch four. Though questions loom about his lack of athleticism and his defense, Ellenson likely would feel comfortable playing in his hometown. 11. Orlando MagicDeyonta Davis, Michigan State, power forward, 6-10, 240It’s too early to say whether Davis can follow Draymond Green’s path as the Spartans’ latest do-it-all forward. But NBA talent evaluators believe he has the tools to excel in the post, on the perimeter and on defense. 12. Atlanta Hawks (from Utah)Wade Baldwin, Vanderbilt, point guard, 6-4, 200Baldwin has the confidence and playmaking abilities to become a great point guard. But NBA scouts hope he can keep his emotions in check. 13. Phoenix SunsDomantas Sabonis, Gonzaga, power forward/center, 6-10, 240Sabonis will spark reminders of his father with his crafty post play and savvy intelligence. But can Sabonis play with better mobility?14. Chicago BullsSkal Labissiere, Kentucky, PF/C, 7-0, 215Labissiere was once projected as a top lottery pick because of his raw skills and size. But after he averaged only 6.6 points and 3.1 rebounds during his one college season, one NBA scout has become concerned with his confidence and intensity level. 15. Denver NuggetsDenzel Valentine, Michigan State, shooting guard, 6-5, 210Concerns regarding the health of his knees won’t be enough to keep too many from passing on this emerging shooter and ball handler. 16. Boston CelticsFurkan Korkmaz, Turkey, shooting guard, 6-7, 175With a surplus of draft picks and backcourt players, the Celtics could stash Korkmaz overseas. That would give him time to fine-tune his shooting range and gain strength. 17. Memphis GrizzliesDemetrius Jackson, Notre Dame, point guard, 6-1, 195The Grizzlies needs bench help in the backcourt. Jackson could fill one of those needs as a dependable pick-and-roll player and shooter. 18. Detroit PistonsThon Maker, Canada, forward, 7-1, 215Maker seems like the perfect fit for Pistons coach Stan Van Gundy, who has a strong track record for getting the most out of talented, undeveloped big men.Malachi Richardson, Syracuse, shooting guard, 6-6, 195Richardson climbed draft boards after proving his ability in pressure moments by leading Syracuse in a comeback victory against Virginia in the Elite Eight. The litmus test is whether Richardson can maintain that consistency over an 82-game NBA season. 19. Denver NuggetsAnte Zizic, Croatia, center, 6-11, 235Zizic could make an immediate impact with his energy, athleticism and quickness. He might be undeveloped, but he could refine those weaknesses if he is stashed. 20. Indiana PacersMalik Beasley, Florida State, shooting guard, 6-4, 185His draft stock plummeted after recent surgery to repair a stress fracture on his shin. Yet, Beasley should recover from that soon and could become a prolific scorer. 21. Atlanta HawksTaurean Prince, Baylor, small forward, 6-7, 215Prince is a prototypical “3-and-D” player. He can guard multiple positions, and his outside shot has remained consistent. 22. Charlotte HornetsBrice Johnson, North Carolina, power forward, 6-10, 210It seems natural he would help another hometown team after leading the Tar Heels to the national championship game. Johnson’s athleticism and mid-range game should quickly translate to the NBA. 23. Boston CelticsAnte Zizic, Croatia, center, 6-11, 240If the Celtics still have this draft pick once they are on the clock, it seems likely they would select an international prospect they can stash overseas. Zizic would be a good option, though he could contribute right away if needed with energy and defense.24. Philadelphia 76ers DeAndre Bembry, St. Joseph’s, shooting guard/small forward, 6-5, 205Bembry hardly matches Simmons’ skill level. But the Sixers might draft Bembry for the same reasons, his passing ability and ability to play multiple positions. 25. ClippersJuan Hernangomez, Spain, forward, 6-9, 220Hernangomez could immediately help the Clippers because of his relative experience (20 years old) and versatility as a scorer in the post and along the perimeter. 26. Philadelphia 76ersTyler Ulis, Kentucky, point guard, 5-10, 150Ulis has continuously had to answer questions about his lack of size. While it might affect his limit his ceiling, Ulis will likely use his perceived weakness as motivation to compete harder. 27. Toronto RaptorsDiamond Stone, Maryland, center, 6-10, 255Even in a league geared more toward small ball, Stone still brings value at the center position with his strength and post play. He must work on consistency, particularly on defense. 28. Phoenix SunsIvica Zubac, C, CroatiaNBA talent evaluators believe Zubac can make up for his lack of mobility with his finishing abilities and length. 29. San Antonio SpursTimothe Luwawu, France, shooting guard/small forward, 6-7, 195Is there a team with a better track record for spotting international talent? Luwawu would complement the Spurs with promising defense and shooting from the wing. 30. Golden State WarriorsGuerschon Yabusele, France, power forward, 6-8, 260The Warriors don’t have major needs after reaching the NBA Finals two years in a row, but Yabusele might be enticing considering he could remain in Europe a bit longer to continue developing. Ben Simmons, LSU, power forward, 6-foot-10, 225 poundsOne NBA executive called Simmons “the most unique handling big to come to the league since LeBron James.” So even if questions have emerged about Simmons’ outside shooting and commitment, his talent alone should offset those issues.center_img The workday has seemingly become endless as the Lakers spent the last month both watching pre-draft workouts and evaluating scouting reports. But the sentiment around the league suggests a foregone conclusion.The Lakers will select Duke forward Brandon Ingram with the No. 2 pick in Thursday’s NBA draft. Of course, Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak always keeps his ears open in case he hears a trade proposal he likes. Unlike the last 20 years under Kobe Bryant, the Lakers do not have anyone on their roster considered untouchable. But below is a mock draft on what appears likely to transpire: 1. Philadelphia 76erslast_img read more


Tag: 上海夜网Pa

first_imgDES MOINES — State Auditor Rob Sand has released a survey showing two-thirds of health care providers consider Medicaid privatization an impediment to their ability to provide services.“A great number of providers felt that the process had become more complex,” Sand said this morning during a news conference via Zoom.The survey was conducted in late 2019. Nearly 83 percent of hospital administrators who responded expressed frustration with delays in getting paid by the private companies that manage care for Iowans enrolled in Medicaid.“Obviously, that in itself suggests that the process should be worked on to be simplified,” Sand said.State officials should create one system for billing, rather than letting each private company that manages care for Medicaid patients operate its own system, according to SandFind a link to survey results here.last_img read more


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first_imgWhen it comes to HR advice, Sharlyn Lauby serves up a generous pour. We were lucky enough to have the opportunity to pull up a stool and ask the author of the popular blog HR Bartender some of our biggest questions about establishing HR at the expansion-stage.Join in as we discuss the first HR role companies should hire for, the difference between culture and policy, HR metrics and ROI, and the trends Sharlyn sees impacting HR heading into 2013.What characteristics should founders/CEOs look for when hiring for their company’s first HR role?Obviously, companies will look at what their needs are at the time. But they should also consider what this role will do as the company grows. It’s unfortunate, but I’ve seen situations where the company only hires for the moment and as the company grows the HR person isn’t given the support (in terms of training/professional development) to grow along with the needs of the company.Do you have any specific suggestions for how a company can make sure this doesn’t happen?The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) released a competency model earlier this year. It includes a self-assessment and competencies at the entry, mid, and executive levels of experience. You can check it out here.How do you dispel the misconception that a company establishing HR is a step towards losing its startup culture?Culture and policy are two different things. A well-crafted policy should not torpedo corporate culture.For example, one of my clients has a strong sense of community. They spend a lot of time giving back and volunteering. I asked them if they wanted to offer an employee benefit of paid volunteer time. They loved the idea. We researched different options and developed a policy. The policy supports their culture.What is biggest contribution HR can bring to a company to help it scale?One of the challenges start-ups face is a lack of consistency. Every employee gets hired with their own unique “deal”. As the organization grows, so does the number of “deals”. At some point, it becomes unmanageable – both from a volume and a fairness perspective. For example, HR can help the company craft the best compensation and benefits structure to align with their culture. I’m pretty sure the goal isn’t anarchy.So HR should anticipate the needs of the company and help it grow. Ask the question – if the company doubles in size, what would that look like? What will employees need? What will managers need? Then, what does HR need to do to support that?What are the best metrics senior management at growth-stage companies should monitor to measure HR ROI?I’m assuming with growth comes lots of recruiting. Staffing related metrics such as cost per hire, turnover cost, time to fill, and yield ratios will be very beneficial. As a HR pro, you do not want lack of hiring to be the reason the company isn’t meeting its goals.Do you have any suggestions in terms of benchmarks, or how HR should work with senior management to establish expectations and get everyone on the same page?There are a couple of ways to look at benchmarks. First in terms of the industry. Let’s say we’re a tech firm. Does the technology arena publish any kind of best practices study? This gives a company the opportunity to compare themselves with their competitive set.The other is based on location. Using the technology example, if my company isn’t in Silicon Valley, then I might be competing for talent against companies not in the tech business. Find out what’s happening in your community.Many consulting firms offer executive research about best practices. One example is the IBM Global CEO Study – very interesting read about what the C-Suite is thinking.Are there any examples of companies incorporating/utilizing HR in innovative ways you would recommend expansion-stage companies look to as potential models?Both Forbes and Fast Company publish a Most Innovative Company List. The Society for Human Resource Management shares the “50 Best Small & Medium Companies to Work for in America”. I believe it can be valuable to read these lists for ideas and inspiration, but keep in mind your own unique culture. It’s also great for recognizing trends.What trend(s) do you see having an impact on HR moving into 2013?I’m hearing a lot more talk about problem solving and process improvement. Companies want employees to be able to figure out stuff on their own and they are allocating resources to make that happen. With companies operating with fewer layers, managers today do not have the time to fix every little issue.I also believe companies are ready to invest in leadership development. There’s too much talk about turnover and disengagement. Organizations recognize the impact of that on the bottom line. They can’t get ahead if the company is constantly churning their employees. The cost to develop good leaders is less than the expense of constant turnover in a disgruntled workforce.Lastly, I see the acceptance of mobile and social technologies. Many organizations held off dealing with new technology because they didn’t see how it fit their business. Now, it’s essential to remain modern and relevant. Do you have HR questions? Ask Sharlyn below!And for more expansion-stage HR advice, check out our recent HR roundtable series.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more