Sabougla Voices: Juke Joint Blues Man Leo Welch

Tag: 上海夜网GA

first_imgThe advent of a new year is typically greeted with a resolution, some new goal – or perhaps an old goal revisited – that will result in a positive change.After reading the story of Leo Welch, my resolution for 2014 has changed. Gone are thoughts of getting outside more, losing a few pounds, or reducing the amount of time I spend on Facebook.Instead, I am simplifying. I hereby resolve to remember that there is no time like the present.Mississippi blues man Leo Welch is my inspiration. Last week, at the ripe young age of 81, Welch released his debut album, Sabougla Voices. Welch’s record came to be because, as an octogenarian, he grasped that simple concept – there is no time like the present. Welch, a longtime gospel blues player, picked up the phone and cold called the folks at Big Legal Mess, a Mississippi record label with juke joint all stars like Junior Kimbrough and Fred McDowell on its roster, and pitched his record.Instead of being turned down, which is what most of us what probably assume would happen at the end of most calls like this, Welch found himself with an invitation to come down to the label’s office to pick some tunes.Welch is, indeed, a fine musician; he plays guitar, harmonica, and fiddle, and once even had the opportunity to audition to B.B. King, though tough financial times kept Welch from making the trip to Memphis for the tryout.Sabougla Voices has the rough and ragged feel of a Mississippi juke joint blues jam, though Welch honed his craft playing in churches, which – these days – vastly outnumber the of juke joins in Mississippi. The songs on the record are honest and real, alternating between rollicking, electrified numbers like “Take Care Of Me Lord” and “Somebody Touched Me” to acoustic tunes like “The Lord Will Make A Way” and “Mother Loves Her Children.” Nowhere on any of these tracks is there an ounce of pretension. Instead, Welch sings of trial and tribulation, faith and praise, with both the confidence of the blues world’s greats and the repentant soul of a sinner.As I have listened to Sabougla Voices over the last few weeks, I cannot help but think of this 80-year-old man picking up the phone, dialing a record label, and pitching a record. Carpe diem, indeed. I want to latch on to the spirit that led to Welch’s phone call, as it is a definite reminder that there is no time like the present. If you have something you want to do, do it. Make the phone call. Climb the mountain. Run the river.That’s excellent advice for a brand new year.Make sure to check out “Praise His Name,” the lead cut from Sabougla Voices, on this month’s Trail Mix.  For more information on Leo Welch, surf over to www.biglegalmessrecords.com.last_img read more


Tag: 上海夜网GA

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Quentin Hillsman said he was confident in his team’s chances of making the NCAA tournament before the selection show Monday. But after 45 minutes of watching as the seedings and matchups were announced, all the Syracuse head coach Hillsman and the rest of the Orange were left with was another shot at the women’s National Invitation Tournament.‘Obviously, the players are very disappointed,’ Hillsman said. ‘We wanted to get into the NCAA tournament. We understand that the first step to winning a national championship is to actually be in the tournament. We understood that.’The NCAA selection committee left the Orange (22-9, 9-6 Big East) out of the field Monday night when it announced the tournament bracket, largely due to what selection committee chair Marilyn McNeil later said was the recurring weakness in its nonconference schedule.Syracuse will move on to the WNIT for the third consecutive season, play in which starts Thursday against Monmouth in the Carrier Dome.SU’s computer numbers may have been the decisive factor to keep it out of the tournament. Syracuse’s was ranked No. 54 in the RPI and its strength of schedule was 114th in the country.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘We looked at them very, very carefully,’ McNeil said in a teleconference after the field was announced. ‘There were some concerns for Syracuse, as there was for many of the teams that did not make the field. One of them always has been a factor, and that is the non-conference schedule. We look at that very closely. Syracuse also had nine losses against top 50 teams.‘So they were a team that had some blemishes in their record, and enough unfortunately to leave them out of the 33.’Syracuse’s resume boasted wins over five teams picked for the tournament field, including a signature nonconference victory over Big Ten champion Ohio State on Dec. 11.The Buckeyes earned a No. 4 seed in the tournament, but the next-best non-league victory for the Orange was a 94-60 triumph over Northeast conference champion St. Francis (Pa.).McNeil said some of the decisions were so tough you could slide a piece of paper between the teams that got in and teams that didn’t. She also remarked, in answering a question about SU, that it isn’t all about the numbers.‘At the end of many discussions — and there were lots of discussions, Syracuse in many of them,’ McNeil said. ‘You kind of put down your computer and you put away your papers and you talk about how they would do on the floor and how they would do in the tournament.’Still, Hillsman felt SU did enough to warrant a tournament birth. He had said throughout the year that if his team got to 10 Big East wins, that would be enough to get it into the field.‘Obviously, we don’t know,’ Hillsman said. ‘I know I don’t know. Because I thought 10 (conference wins) was it. The only thing that I do know is the more games you win, the better chance you have of getting in the tournament.’The players were not made available for comment after the tournament field was announced. They began trickling out of the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center 20 minutes after the final pairing was announced.But from the very beginning of this season, senior Erica Morrow was talking about getting back to NCAA Tournament. Missing out on it for the third consecutive season, she said, would be nothing less than a disappointment.‘It would be definitely a disappointment for me, definitely for the program,’ Morrow said on the team’s media day Oct. 18. ‘… We’re trying to rebuild the program here back in Syracuse. It’s my last opportunity so it’d be, personally, a disappointment for me.’Hillsman did not come to the podium until 40 minutes after the bracket was finalized. He said all he told his team was there was more basketball to be played and that he would see them for practice in the morning.Hillsman also said in his press conference that the scheduling issue would be addressed if that was the deciding factor in Syracuse being left out. But he added that he had no regrets about what his Orange did this year.‘We’re 12-1 in our non-league and we beat some teams that won their conference tournaments,’ he said. ‘I’m not going to look back at that and regret anything that we did in our non-league. I’m not going to look back and regret anything in our conference besides not pulling out a couple more games that we had a chance to win.’zjbrown@syr.edu Comments mcooperj@syr.edu Published on March 14, 2011 at 12:00 pmlast_img read more


Tag: 上海夜网GA

first_img Published on February 4, 2013 at 1:12 am Contact David: dbwilson@syr.edu | @DBWilson2 Tyler Rouse’s whole family wanted to him to play for Syracuse. He grew up an Orange fan living just miles away from the Carrier Dome. He fondly remembers going to football games, munching on Dome Dogs and taking in the atmosphere.So when an SU coach came to visit the running back during his senior year and invited him to a camp, it was an exciting proposition for the Baldwinsville, N.Y., native.But in the week leading up to the camp, Rouse received a phone call.“They called and said they couldn’t get over my size and they probably couldn’t really keep recruiting me,” Rouse said. “So, therefore, I didn’t end up going to the camp because I felt that I was unwanted and there was no need to go.”Despite totaling nearly 3,000 yards on the ground and 45 touchdowns during his senior season, Rouse had virtually no offers until last week. His Scout.com page is barren, his Rivals.com and ESPNU pages nonexisten. In a new age of recruiting, fueled by the Internet and television, there’s almost no evidence of the running back who rewrote the Central New York record books and put up unmatched numbers this season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWith two days remaining until National Signing Day, Rouse, New York’s Gatorade Player of the Year, remains undecided on his college future. Despite being one of the best to ever play in Central New York, Syracuse hasn’t made an offer. He had almost no interest from major conference schools until the past two weekends, when he traveled to a pair of undisclosed schools, including one in the Atlantic Coast Conference.The recruiting well ran so dry for Rouse that had a Football Championship Subdivision offered him a full scholarship as recently as three weeks ago, his high school coach Carl Sanfilippo said, he probably would have accepted.“Honestly, I was a little worried,” Rouse said, “but you can’t have that in mind.”He isn’t an imposing figure. He stands just 5 feet, 8 inches and is about 205 pounds. Under long sleeve clothing it’s impossible to tell that he overpowers defenders on the field.But he bulldozed his way to 2,977 yards and 45 touchdowns as a senior. The Bees finished 8-2 and won their division. Against division runner-up Fayetteville-Manlius, Rouse ran for 272 yards and four touchdowns. In all but two games, Rouse busted touchdown runs that stretched at least half of the field.He does his damage on the second level. While his speed is exceptional – he ran a 4.46 40-yard dash – he takes most of his carries between the tackles, rarely settling for edges. After he bursts through the defensive line, he can either overpower linebackers and defensive backs, or pull off devastating cuts to get around opposing defenders.For nearly two years, Rouse has trained with Vinny Scollo at VB Performance in Brewerton, N.Y. The 28-year-old trainer is gaining a reputation as one of the best and most innovative in the business.Traditional Olympic weightlifting is part of the workout routines he has for Rouse and the Baldwinsville football team. But most of Rouse’s work is resistance training and lifting on unstable surfaces, all to better the undersized back’s durability, endurance and movement. Even with opposing defenses keying on him, Rouse managed 33 rushes a game, while excelling on the defensive end as a linebacker, too.“When he came to me, I told him we need to make him as durable as possible and we need to make ready, to basically prepare him for overtime in every game,” Scollo said. “To where he is going to be that strong, and just as strong as the fourth as he is in the first quarter.”There are no attitude issues surrounding the running back either. He’s “a kid you want,” his high school coach said. He does volunteer work on his own.“You just can’t say enough about him,” Sanfilippo said. “Never been in trouble a day in this building, never been in trouble a day — that’s hard to find. He’s drug- and alcohol-free. He’s a kid who loves video games and loves football.”But for whatever reason, Syracuse, the university less than 15 miles down Interstate 690, remains distant. One of Rouse’s former teammates, Nick Robinson, is a guard for the Orange. His high school coach played for SU. But Rouse estimates he received only three letters from the Orange in his four years of high school.Even with the defections stemming from the recent coaching change – most notably running back Augustus Edwards from Staten Island, N.Y. – no one from new head coach Scott Shafer’s staff has come by with interest in the running back.“I don’t know if I can feel the same, like the passion and pride into them,” Rouse said. “If they win I’m pleased to hear, but I’m not going to go against them obviously, but there’s kind of like an ‘X’ there.”Both Rouse and his head coach feel confident that next season, he’ll be playing at one of the ACC schools he’s meeting with. He’ll get his chance against Syracuse, a chance to play in front of friends and family at the Dome, and a chance to play on television stations seen in his hometown.One comparison Sanfilippo uses for his running back is Ray Rice. Sanfilippo was on the coaching staff for the 2005 Governor’s Bowl, when the former New Rochelle (N.Y.) High School running back won MVP honors after rushing for 122 yards. In size, speed and physicality, Rouse is, in many ways, a spitting image of the current Baltimore Ravens back.There could be another similarity. Eight years ago, SU missed on Rice and the running back ended up starring for Rutgers and finishing seventh in 2006 Heisman Trophy voting during his sophomore season.Syracuse never beat the Scarlet Knights during the Rice era. Rouse now seems poised to go to a conference rival as well.“Would we have loved to have seen him at Syracuse? Yeah, we would have. No doubt, we would have. Didn’t happen,” Sanfilippo said. “ … Kids grow up around here, that’s where they want to play.”Tony Grosso is now retired, but coached in Central New York for 33 years and still regularly attends Rouse’s games. He’s seen players develop, leave the area and star elsewhere, even going to the NFL. But Rouse is one of a kind.“I haven’t seen a kid like that around this area ever, realistically,” Grosso said. “What do you got to have to play major college football?”Recently, Rouse said, he dreamed about playing against Syracuse in the Dome.It’d be a big moment in his career. His family always wanted a chance to see him play in the Dome, and even if SU never offered a scholarship, it’s his opportunity to prove that’s where he belonged.“I’m playing with all my heart that game, not that I’m not going to play with all my heart the other games, but I really — I’m going to feel that game something a little more than other games I’ll play,” Rouse said. “I would have a target on my schedule if that was the case because I feel like, maybe not that I deserve to go there or that they should offer me, but I feel like I should have been at least acknowledged a little more in the process.“Because I am like, right in the back yard and I barely got talked to and I got let up that easy.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more