Month: August 2019

Month: August 2019

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Internet offers us an abundance of options when selecting everything from bicycles to mates that is unprecedented in human history. Although we may think that the extra options are good, new research has shown that we may be more satisfied when choosing from fewer options – and we may not even be cognitively equipped to correct this misconception.Throughout most of human history, we’ve had significantly fewer options for choosing a mate, and so we would strongly welcome any additional options when they came along. For instance, when our neocortex was developing, in part to deal with social networks, the average human group consisted of roughly 150 individuals. Healthy group members of reproductive age of the opposite sex would total about 35 – slim pickings, by the Internet’s standards. Because we developed in this kind of social environment, we have a tendency to desire ever more options. That’s why, for example, people are enticed by dating Web site Match.com’s offer of “millions of possibilities.” But, as a team of researchers has shown in a recent study, this abundance of options may not make the chooser feel or choose any better than a pool of just a half dozen or so options. Psychologist Alison Lenton from the University of Edinburgh, Barbara Fasolo from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and cognitive scientist Peter Todd from Indiana University have presented their findings on this subject in a recent issue of IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication.As the researchers explain, people tend to anticipate that they’ll feel better about “shopping for a mate” when there is a large number of options. However, in actuality, people feel equally good when faced with few as opposed to many options. The scientists performed two experiments demonstrating this clash between anticipation and experience. In their first experiment, the researchers asked 88 participants (with an average age of 22) what they thought was the ideal number of potential mates to choose from, with a range between 1 and 5,000 options. Participants judged each set (very small to very large) of potential mates on four criteria: expected difficulty of making a selection, anticipated satisfaction with their decision, anticipated regret after making their decision, and expected enjoyment of the selection process. Coat the ravens evermore? To protect tortoises, officials test spraying oil into birds’ nests Citation: Online Dating: Where Technology and Evolution Collide (2008, June 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-06-online-dating-technology-evolution-collide.html Explore further When searching for a soul mate, you might think that the more options, the better. But the rise of technology – notably, the Internet – has thrown a wedge in that perception. On average, participants predicted that they would be overall most satisfied when selecting from about 20-50 possible mates. So, in the second experiment, the researchers investigated how satisfied people were when choosing a mate from this range compared with the less favored fewer options. Interestingly, they found that participants who chose from 20 personal profiles had roughly similar experiences compared with participants who had to pick from just four profiles. Also, participants’ actual experiences when faced with four options were significantly better than anticipated.As the researchers summarized, “the expected preference for the larger set-size in terms of more enjoyment and satisfaction and less regret did not materialize.” Instead, there is a significant mismatch between what people think they will feel and what they actually feel, the team concluded.Misjudgment of an optimal number of options has been observed in several other situations besides choosing a mate. Generally, the greatest disadvantages when having more options include being more frustrated by the complexity of the selection process, sometimes not making a selection at all, and experiencing decreased satisfaction and increased regret after making a selection. (When you’re faced with a million possibilities, you have a much smaller chance of picking the “right” one than if you had to pick from just four.)The study also offers suggestive evidence that people aren’t paying very close attention to all of the various information provided in the profiles when they have many profiles to sift through and, thus, they might be missing out on interesting/suitable potential mates in this choice context.“The information overload result was well known to consumer researchers since the ‘70s,” Fasolo told PhysOrg.com. “But the context was always consumer – a bit artificial and more ‘novel’ in an evolutionary sense. It was not at all obvious that the same result would occur in the more naturalistic context of mate choice. True, we are examining a more modern mate choice world – not sequential encounters in the jungle, but simultaneous fast-paced encounters with men zooming from one café table to the next – to which humans are relatively less accustomed (though lekking animals are). So, all in all, I would say that the fact that greater variety backfired even in the context of mate choice was non-obvious.”Researchers have previously tried to explain our misjudgment of option number in evolutionary terms. At the time our brains were evolving to deal with making decisions, humans rarely had too many options to deal with. Therefore, we’re not adapted to deal with the excessive numbers of choices available today. The Internet, which has no physical space limitations, presents us with a problem that never existed for our ancestors. (As the researchers note, about 1% of the 600,000,000 people who use the Internet visit online dating sites.)After millions of years of seeking more variety under conditions where variety was relatively limited, it may be very difficult to persuade people that more isn’t always better. For one thing, people may not have a point of comparison where they can experience the benefits of fewer options. Also, recognition of the disadvantages may not come until much later on. Further, even if we do learn from our experiences, it may not matter much. Research has shown that people’s expectations, rather than previous actual experiences, play a larger role in determining whether they will participate in the same event in the future. In light of these findings, the researchers suggest that Web designers of online dating sites consider this contrast and try to appease people’s desire for more options while making it easier to narrow down large sets. Currently, some sites do the opposite: when a search results yields fewer than 50 (or more, in some cases) profiles, the site encourages users to broaden their search criteria. Instead, the researchers encourage developers to keep in mind that they must balance people’s desire for more choices with the knowledge that giving people such choices may lead them to evaluate potential mates in a more superficial way.“I find it interesting (and a bit worrying) that the underestimation of the costs of too much choice which we (and other consumer researchers alike) find plagues not just the daters, but the designers of dating Web sites,” Fasolo said. “If we want people to make sensible choices, researchers need to ‘nudge’ (to say it with Thaler and Sunstein) dating Web site designers towards simpler and more manageable Web sites.”More information: Lenton, Alison P.; Fasolo, Barbara; and Todd, Peter M. “’Shopping’ for a Mate: Expected versus Experienced Preferences in Online Mate Choice.” IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, Vol. 51, No. 2, June 2008. Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_img Languages are dying out around the globe through globalisation, social change, a shift in populations from rural areas to cities, and often well-intentioned education in national languages and national cultures rather than local indigenous languages and traditions. Of the 6,500 languages estimated by UNESCO to be still in use, only 11 are spoken by half the world’s population, and 95 percent of the languages are spoken by five percent of the global population.A new project, the World Oral Literature Project, led by anthropologist Dr Mark Turin of the University of Cambridge’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, aims to preserve the linguistic diversity being lost as elders die and young people turn to the national languages taught in schools and used by the media. The project is recording and documenting languages that face the prospect of dying out, with the goal of preserving their poems, chants, stories, and anything else that can be recorded. Turin receives boxes of DVDs from small indigenous communities around the world, who hope the project will preserve their language and literature for future generations. The project uses a range of media including voice recorders, video cameras and other multimedia technologies, and is building a digital archive that will be accessible on demand both by academics and by people of the communities themselves.An oral tradition is central for many of the groups, rather than a written tradition, and many communities have never had their songs and stories recorded by anyone. Groups collaborating with anthropologists to have their languages recorded for the first time are widespread, and include communities such as the Amurdag community in Northern Australia, the Maka in Paraguay, Chulym in Siberia, and the Kallawaya community in Bolivia.The idea for the project began when Turin documented the language of the Thangmi community in Nepal for his PhD in endangered languages at Leiden University in The Netherlands. The choice of language was random, with Turin selecting the community from a map on his supervisor’s study wall. The language was virtually unknown outside the tiny community, and was completely undocumented. Turin’s project eventually created a trilingual word list in Thangmi, Nepali, and English, that is still sold in the community and which is being used to teach children about their own language and heritage. Turin said he was amazed so few linguists are working on endangered languages, and people “do PhDs on the apostrophe in French,” but no one knows precisely how many undocumented languages there are. When a language ceases to exist, so does its cultural world view, and much of the heritage of the community is lost.The World Oral Literature Project has secured funding of £30,000 to aid communities in the recordings. Its first international workshop is to be held in Cambridge this week. Similar projects are being carried out by National Geographic and their Enduring Voices project, the Arcadia fund, and the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project. It is also worth noting that in Europe there are many languages in need of efforts to preserve them, such as Cornish in England, Gaelic in Scotland, and Breton in France.More information: World Oral Literature ProjectThe World Oral Literature Project is currently seeking sustainable long-term funding to ensure that it can make a permanent contribution to theurgent documentation of endangered traditions.© 2009 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — There are an estimated 6,500 languages in the world, with around fifty percent of them endangered and likely to cease to exist by 2100, but efforts are now being made to save them from extinction. Investigating the world of languages Recitation of oral texts by the late Latte Apa, senior ritual practitioner of the Thangmi community, India. Image credit: World Oral Literature Project Explore further Citation: Efforts to save endangered languages (2009, December 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-12-efforts-endangered-languages.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_img Age of earliest human burial in Britain pinpointed Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — A new archaeological study in Britain has shown that its multi-cultural nature is not a new phenomenon, but that even in Roman times there was a strong African influence, with North Africans moving in high social circles. © 2010 PhysOrg.com A computerised reconstruction of how the Ivory Bangle Lady could have looked. Image credit: Dr Hella Eckardt/University of Reading The analysis of the Lady and other skeletons and artifacts contradicts the popular assumption about Britain in Roman times that African immigrants were usually males, of low status, and most were slaves, and shows that high status women from Africa were also present in the society. Dr Eckardt said the research on the Lady and other skeletons suggest the society was as diverse, and possibly more diverse than it is today.The Roman Empire extended into the Near and Middle East, North Africa, and included Europe, and there were great movements of people throughout the Empire, both voluntary and involuntary. York (or Eboracum, as it was then known) was an important city of the period and eventually was named capital of “Britannia Inferior.” Emperor Septimius Severus, who was born in North Africa, was one of two Roman Emperors who visited Eboracum, and died there.The paper is published in this month’s edition of the journal Antiquity. The skeleton and artifacts will be displayed in August as part of the Yorkshire Museum’s exhibition: Roman York — Meet the People of the Empire.center_img More information: A Lady of York: migration, ethnicity and identity in Roman Britain, Antiquity, Volume: 84 Number: 323 Page: 131-145. antiquity.ac.uk/ant/084/ant0840131.htm The study, led by Dr Hella Eckardt of the Department of Archaeology at Reading University, used pioneering forensic techniques to study fourth century artifacts and bones in the Yorkshire Museum’s collections in York. The researchers used isotope analysis and forensic ancestry assessment to analyze the items, which included the “Ivory Bangle Lady” skeleton and goods buried with her. The Ivory Bangle Lady remains were found in August 1901 in a stone coffin unearthed in Bootham, where a group of graves were found. The grave has been dated to the latter half of the fourth century. Items buried with the Lady included expensive luxury items such African elephant ivory bracelets, beads, pendants and other jewelry, a blue glass jug, a glass mirror, and Yorkshire jet. A rectangular bone mount, possibly for a wooden coffin, was also found in the grave. An inscription on the bone, “Hail sister, may you live in God,” suggests the woman held religious beliefs and may have been Christian. She is believed to have been one of the richest inhabitants of the city.The researchers analyzed and measured the Lady’s skull and facial features, and looked at the chemical signatures of her diet. They also examined the burial site to build a picture of her social status and ancestry.Dr Eckardt said the results showed the Ivory Bangle Lady was of mixed ancestry, and the isotope analysis suggested she may have migrated to Britain from a warmer climate. This evidence, along with the goods found in the ground, and the fact the burial rite was unusual, all point to the her having been of North African descent, arriving in Britain possibly via the Mediterranean, and she was of high social status. Citation: Roman era York may have been more diverse than today (2010, March 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-03-roman-era-york-diverse-today.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgAn artist’s impression shows the surroundings of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the active galaxy NGC 3783 in the southern constellation of Centaurus. A new University at Buffalo study finds that — contrary to what some physicists have argued for the years — information is not lost once it has entered a black hole. The research presents explicit calculations showing how information is, in fact, preserved. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser New technology made news this week as well—Microsoft announced a cheaper version of the Surface Pro 3 tablet—they are selling it for $499. Meanwhile at UCLA’s California NanoSystems Institute, a team of researchers announced that they had created quick-charging hybrid supercapacitors that can store large amounts of energy, recharge quickly and last for more than 10,000 charge/recharge cycles—perhaps offering a way to keep portable devices running longer. Also another team at Caltech announced that they had developed a camera chip that provides superfine 3-D resolution. They claim that someday soon it could be used to allow a smartphone to take a picture of something and then have that thing replicated on a 3D printer to a resolution of mere microns. Also Google unveiled an Asus made “stick” computer. Called the Chromebit. It is a full computer and is smaller than a candy bar; it can be plugged into a computer monitor to create a complete system.In other news, a team of researchers at the University of Central Florida reported that a simple $1 test outperforms PSA screening for prostate cancer—the team has developed the test and claim it also provides results in just minutes. Also, another team of scientists discovered the elusive secret of how continents were formed.And finally, if you have heard rumors about something called “exploding head syndrome,” believe them: A team of researchers has found that it exists and is actually quite common in young people. It is where a person experiences a loud noise inside their head just as they are falling asleep, jarring them awake and causing anxiety. A team of researchers found that approximately 18 percent of college teens had experienced it at least one time. © 2015 Phys.org Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Black holes don’t erase information, scientists say Citation: Best of Last Week—Black holes don’t erase information, a stick computer and the exploding head syndrome (2015, April 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-weekblack-holes-dont-erase-syndrome.html (Phys.org)—It was another good week for physics as a team of researchers with the University of Waterloo found that a photon “afterglow” could transmit information without transmitting energy—though the receiver must expend energy to read that information. Also good news for physicists trying to solve the “information loss paradox”—a team of researchers has found a way to show that black holes don’t erase information—they claim that interactions between particles emitted by a black hole can be used to reveal information about material that “disappeared” inside of it. Also a team of researchers in China has for the first time performed machine learning on a photonic quantum computer—and claim it could speed up the rate at which certain machine learning tasks are performed.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters , Physical Review X This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: Chiral zero sound found in Weyl semimetals (2019, June 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-chiral-weyl-semimetals.html More information: Zhida Song et al. Hear the Sound of Weyl Fermions, Physical Review X (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.9.021053 . On Arxiv: https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.09926 The marriage of topology and magnetism in a Weyl systemcenter_img In a typical metal, electrons will move from a hot region to a cold one, carrying both heat and charge. In Weyl semimetals, however, the electrons near the Weyl points form quasiparticles that, in a magnetic field, can contribute to heat conduction without transporting charge [1, 2]. This charge-less transport arises because the contribution of charge from two pairs of Weyl points cancel each other out (inset). Credit: APS/Alan Stonebraker A pair of researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology has found that a chiral zero sound (CZS) effect can be induced in Weyl semimetals. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Zhida Song and Xi Dai describe their experiments with Weyl semimetals and what they found. © 2019 Science X Network , arXiv Weyl semimetals have only recently been discovered, though they were predicted to exist in 1929 by Herman Weyl. They are topological materials in which electronic excitations exhibit massless behavior. Prior research has shown that fermions that adhere to Weyl’s theorem exist as quasiparticles in some solids—those that have electron energy bands that cross at points close to the Fermi energy. Notably, they behave differently than electrons in metals—they exhibit the chiral magnetic effect. This effect is observed when a Weyl metal is exposed to a magnetic field—a current is generated where positive and negative particles move in parallel and anti-parallel to the magnetic field. In such situations, the flow of current is zero because the particles cancel each other out. This changes, however, when the semimetal is placed in a parallel electric current resulting in a quasiparticle flow—an effect known as the chiral anomaly. In this new effort, Song and Dai have shown that the chiral magnetic effect can also lead to a phenomenon called the chiral zero sound (CZS), a newly discovered heat transport mechanism that can be seen in Weyl semimetals. Zero sound comes about due to vibrations, but it is carried by the momentum distribution of electrons when they exist near the Fermi Level. The study reports that they have existed all along, occurring when researchers place a Weyl semimetal in a magnetic field—now, the researchers have observed them in action. They report that the effect contributes to the thermal conductivity of such materials. They also note that its velocity can be modulated by altering the magnetic field. And they note that the effect can be measured using a variety of techniques, such as employing pump and probe. They describe their discovery as a “completely new sound mode carried by Weyl fermions under a magnetic field.”last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgRemember the movie American Desi? And even more specifically the song Aap Jaisa Koi that had a boy crooning the lyrics of the hit Bolly number with a spectacular acapella touch to it?We are talking about Penn Masala — the acapella band from the University of Pennsylvania that has music lovers paying them good attention as they render interesting mash-ups of Bollywood and international songs with their own signature touch. And guess what, they are on their second India tour and their last stop is Delhi. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Talking history, Penn Masala was started by four students in 1996 in the university. The inspiration came from the eclectic mix of music these students grew up on. Bollywood, south Asian tracks and influences merged with international strains and found place in acapella sounds, and there was Penn Masala, says current president Sam Levenson.What started in 1996 and found shape through seven albums (Awaaz, 11 PM Soundcheck, The Brown Album, Pehchaan, On Detours, Panoramic Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix and the compilation album Out of Stock) that included some strong original compositions is now in its 13th year and counting. Every year, singers graduate and new talent is brought in. Levenson joined Penn Masala in 2009 as a fresher and is now in his senior year and as he says — there is no looking back.And do the alumni ever come together? Of course they do, says Levenson. Every fall the old students come together to pass on the Penn Masala history to the freshers, and there are informal meets around the year. Once singers graduate, they get busy with the non-musical part of their careers, adds Levenson, but they are always there to support the team. Speaking about the alumni, Levenson points out that quite a few old Penn Masala members are in Delhi and they are all coming in for the 11 January performance. Back in India after 2009, Penn Masala has already performed in Mumbai and Pune, there are two more cities on the cards before Delhi becomes the last stop on this tour. While Mumbai had almost 700 people attending their show, Pune was more fun, says Levenson. The crowd, the ambience, the vibe and the sound system was wonderful, he points out. ‘Delhi gave us an energetic crowd three years back and we expect a big show this time around as well,’ he adds.So what is their modus operandi this time around? They have tied up with Teach for India campaign and have already given a few schools a taste of their music skills and they hope to extend the collaboration over this year working on mutual promotions and fund-raising events. Penn Masala is also hoping to tie up with media houses like they did last year to create an Independance Day music video on Maa Tujhe Salaam. They have also started work on their music video. And the icing on 2013 is their eighth album that is all set for a March release.What next for the band? Bollywood, pat comes the reply. ‘We want to work with artistes who have inspired the Penn Masala kind of music,’ says Levenson. DETAILAt: Hard Rock Café, DLF Saket When: 11 January Timings: 9 pm onwardsEntry: Rs 1,500last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgHowever, most restaurants and diners leave us very disappointed when it comes to the pigs and the cows. Well worry no more. One of Hauz Khas’s latest hangouts, Matchbox, is all ready to dish out as much of those sinful eats as you want. We walked into Matchbox on an unsuspecting Thursday night. Placed pertly just a next to Raasta, Matchbox has come up where Themis used to be. Which is a huge relief because Themis was quite terrible. With spanking new interiors Matchbox appeals to your senses with some very innovative walls, some comfy cushions, a video game console for Tekken (which we loved!) and yes – some great music (these guys love their old school rock, thank the lord!).  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Chatting with Amit, one of the brains behind this two-month old joint, we get to know that the venue is all about all things legendary. The music, the movies, sports and of course the comics. We dug into the classic Pigs in a Blanket and the pork sausage pizza as Pink Floyd played in the background. Then came the bacon and fries ( a generous helping of bacon strips with french fries) and we were in heaven!  These guys also have a classic hotdog, a mac and cheese , fried chicken, burgers and yes – maggi! You can add your own twist to the dish of course picking from chicken, veggies and bacon bits. Yes. Get the drift – we love the bacon. They have a huge list of cocktails on offer and some select wines so pick your poison. They also have an all-day breakfast that you could try and a pretty impressive dessert spread which we skipped thanks to all the yummy meat we had just downed with a lot of beer. For next time! Head over and check these guys out.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgSix persons, including two juveniles have been arrested by the Delhi Police for brutally killing a 35-year-old man after the victim indulged in an argument with two of the accused at a petrol pump in West Delhi on Wednesday night.The victim has been identified as Surender Singh, a resident of Mahavir Nagar area in Tilak Nagar and was once arrested in the year 2008 under the charges of murder. However, he was out of jail on bail. On Wednesday night, at around 10.30 pm, he went to the petrol pump on his scooty in Paschim Vihar. According to the police, when Singh reached the petrol pump, he had an argument with two men, later identified as Vinay and Md Khalid. They were riding on one motorcycle. A minor scuffle also took place between them but the petrol pump staff intervened to bring the situation under control.Singh then left the petrol pump and headed towards the District Centre. The duo followed him and also asked four of their friends, identified as Raja, Deepak and two juveniles, to reach District Centre at around 11.30 pm. All six accused, including the two juveniles thrashed him. In defence, he whipped out his knife but one of the men from the other group snatched away his knife and stabbed him to death, after which they fled.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgNew Delhi: In a boost to the Centre’s flagship Ayushman Bharat-National Health Protection Mission, the West Bengal government today signed an MoU with the NHA for implementing the health insurance scheme in the state, following a long-drawn negotiation. Through the Ayushman Bharat-National Health Protection Scheme (AB-NHPM), the government aims to provide a coverage of Rs 5 lakh per family annually to more than 10 crore poor households. The National Health Agency (NHA) is the apex body for implementation of the insurance scheme. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life “Earlier this month, they (West Bengal) sent the draft MoU which was approved by the NHA, following which the health department of the West Bengal government signed the MoU with the agency today,” a government official said. According a source, Delhi is also likely to adopt the scheme. The Union health ministry has launched a formal process to empanel public and private hospitals to achieve universal health coverage under AB-NHPM. A senior official in the ministry said the Centre is carrying out beneficiary identification process based on the Socio-Economic Caste Census (SECC) data, and 80 per cent of beneficiaries in rural areas and 60 per cent in the urban areas, have been identified. Announced in the 2018-19 Budget, the AB-NHPM is being touted as the ‘world’s largest government funded health care scheme’ and is likely to be rolled out on August 15.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgKolkata: State Irrigation minister Soumen Mahapatra lashed out at the Centre’s dilly-dallying approach in disbursement of its share of funds for various flood management projects in Bengal.Responding to queries from some MLAs in the state Assembly on Tuesday regarding the steps taken by the state for flood management across the state, the minister said, “the Keleghai-Kapaleswari-Baghai project for flood control in West and East Midnapore is progressing well. As per the sanctioned plan, the share of funds for the entire project of Rs 650.58 crore stands at a 50:50 ratio to be shared by the Centre and state. The state has already spent Rs 340.69 crore for various works under the project, while the Centre has allocated Rs 162.62 crore till date. This apathy in fund allocation on the part of the Centre is delaying work.” Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAccording to the minister, when the project was sanctioned the sharing pattern was agreed at 75:25 by Centre and state. However, some years ago, the Centre for some unknown reasons decreased their share to 50 percent.Mahapatra further maintained that in case of the Kandi master plan for flood management in Murshidabad that involves Rs 438.94 crore, work has started and tender has been floated for work involving Rs 362.86 crore.”The state has already allocated Rs 282 crore for the project, while the Centre, in three phases since 2014, has given a meagre Rs 80.93 crore. We need permission from the Railways for a part of the work. But the nod is taking a lot of time,” he said. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe minister also pointed out the Centre’s lackadaisical attitude towards allocation of funds for repair and reconstruction of the dams in Sunderbans that were damaged by Aila in 2009. “The plan that was sanctioned involved Rs 5,000 crore, out of which the Centre has given only Rs 550 crore till date. The state has spent Rs 270 crore and will be spending another Rs 150 crore in this financial year,” he said.The state has plans to reconstruct a 106 km river barrage in the Aila affected Sunderbans by March 2020. The Irrigation department has already made a 72.50 km barrage for flood management. “Even when it comes to construction of check dam over river Karru at Bagmundi in Purulia district to prevent flood, the Centre’s apathy in release of funds is delaying work,” Mahapatra said.It may be mentioned that for Purulia, a part of Junglemahal, the Centre-state share is supposed to be in the ratio of 90:10. “The Centre is releasing funds for the neighbouring state Chhattisgarh which is ruled by BJP, but when it comes to Bengal the fund allocation is dwindling,” the minister said.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgKolkata: State Education minister Partha Chatterjee on Thursday raised questions over the evaluation of the answer scripts of History in the wake of a number of students who had scored 90 percent or above in Higher Secondary or its equivalent examinations getting less than 10 in the entrance test at Jadavpur University.”A number of students have approached me in the past few days who have secured less than 5 in the entrance examinations at JU. These students have bagged more than 80 percent or even 90 percent marks in History in the Board examinations. Even Granthan Sengupta, who came first in Higher Secondary examination, is among the students who have secured poor marks in JU’s History entrance test. Have the answer scripts been examined properly,” the minister questioned.He, who has always claimed that admission should be strictly on the basis of merit, was critical against a section of students who had agitated in the varsity demanding admission test for a number of days last month. “Now, I will ask those students who had agitated whether there has been transparency in the evaluation of the answer scripts in the entrance examination,” Chatterjee said.JU decided on Thursday that Vice-Chancellor Suranjan Das will be acting as the Chairman of the admission committee of Jadavpur University and a fresh review of the History answer scripts will be conducted. Registrar Chiranjib Bhattacharjee will assist the V-C. The decision was taken after Dean of Arts Subhasish Biswas wrote to Vice-Chancellor Das praying resignation.”I strongly declare that the entire crisis which has taken place in the admission procedure of BA admission test in History of JU is due to my negligence of work and I am solely responsible for that… In the case of admission test in History, I detected an uneven marking after receiving many complaints,” Biswas’ self-declaration stated.A senior JU administrative official said Biswas’ resignation from the post of Dean of Arts has been accepted and he will no longer be involved in the admission process. “He is also the head of the History department. His resignation from this post is still under consideration,” the official added.A section of students had been demanding the resignation of Biswas in the wake of this crisis and had gheraoed Das and some other senior administrative officials on Wednesday. It was lifted in the wee hours on Thursday after Biswas tendered his resignation. The admission in the Arts subjects like International Relations, Bengali and English went off peacefully on Thursday with the majority of the seats getting occupied.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgThe Indian contingent added seven more medals, including five gold, to their kitty on day three of the 13th Asian Shooting Championship here on Thursday.This took India’s overall medal tally from the competition to 21. On the third day, Shainki Nagar won a gold with a score of 197 in youth’s 10m air pistol finals. Samarjit Singh won the bronze. The two combined with Mohit Gour to also win the team gold in the event, shooting a combined total of 1690 to beat the Korean team which shot a total of 1677 while Thailand team won the bronze with a score of 1629. Also Read – A league of his own!Sumedh Kumar bagged his third medal of the competition by winning a bronze in the 10M air pistol junior men’s event. He also won the team gold in the event combining with Hemendra Kushwaha and Achal Pratap Grewal after shooting a total score of 1706.In 50m rifle prone junior men’s event, Swapnil Kusale claimed the gold by shooting a score of 185.4. The silver was won by Qatar’s Mohammad Saad Almubarak and the bronze by Ce Wang of China.India also won the team gold in the event when Swapnil Kusale, Ishan Goel and Akhil Sheoran shot a combined total of 1839.4 to beat the teams from Korea and China.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgVisuals have always been a better way to elucidate one’s feelings as well as reach out to people and connect with much ease and sincerity and so what can be better than photography exhibition, where images speak for themselves.Keeping that thought in mind, ‘Habitat Photosphere,’ a photography festival will hold its first ever international workshop titled ‘The World Upside Down: Modes of Representation in The East and the West’ by French artist Pascal Monteil at the Experimental Art Gallery, India Habitat Centre on Saturday.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Monteil will take the participants of the workshop, from Rome to Tokyo, through Ispahan, Lahore and Fatehpur Sikri, onto a visual journey through world art histories and their modes of representation. He will be discussing specific paintings as well as his personal journey as an artist taking inspiration from various traditions.Monteil’s works are done using a particular technique called digital painting. “Each one of my work is done minutely with thousands of photographic elements either designed or painted; they are adjusted, superimposed, revised and lit-up on computer. Thanks to digital technique, using these fragments just as a painter would do with his colors and paintbrushes; I wish to achieve pictures with a photographic depiction combined with the very special power of painting to sublime the real and its emotional precision,” said Monteil. Monteil’s work is an exploration and a re-interpretation of Persian and Indian miniature traditions.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDr Alka Pande, curator and art consultant, Visual Arts Gallery, IHC said, “Pascal Monteil is an artist of the world. An international cosmopolitanism, bordering on the exotic and the unknown, characterises his suite of ‘paintings’. He is an artist, who combines the traditional art of painting with contemporary digital photography and makes compelling landscapes which cross boundaries of geographies and cultures. These phantasmagorical imagined landscapes emerge from his experiences and his training as a painter. A peripatetic traveler, his paintings are replete with historical and cultural references. An incredible storyteller, Pascal is a bard, who through his lyrical renditions tells stories about his travels. From the city of love, philosophy and artistic effulgence Paris, he travels to India, to Persia to Japan, reading the landscapes of these ancient civilisations, creating arresting juxtapositions on the canvas.”  Pascal Monteil is a visual artist who lives and works between Paris and various cities in Asia. Beside his artistic practice, Pascal has also been teaching art and architecture for the past fifteen years. The fee for participation in the workshop is Rs 400 for India Habitat Centre members; Rs 500 for non-members and Rs 200 Rs for students. As a part of Habitat Photosphere’s aim of taking art photography into the public space, Monteil’s works will also be exhibited at the Jor Bagh metro station from December 2015 till March 2016.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgContradicting common perception, researchers have found that low levels of vitamin D, also known as the “sunshine vitamin”, does not cause or worsen sleep apnea.Sleep apnea causes repeated awakenings and pauses in breathing during the night. Obesity appears to contribute to the adverse effects.“The link between obesity and vitamin D deficiency can be explained a number of ways, one of which is that obese individuals are less likely to be physically active, thereby limiting their sun exposure,” said senior investigator Ken Kunisaki, associate professor of medicine at University of Minnesota in the US. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“Although our study was not designed to figure out why obese people have lower vitamin D levels, our results ultimately suggest that low vitamin D levels do not cause or worsen sleep apnea,” Kunisaki said. The study involved a cohort of 2,827 participants who were generally healthy and elderly males with average age 76.4 years. “Taking additional vitamin D supplements is not likely to prevent or improve sleep apnea,” Kunisaki said.The researchers also found no evidence to support a link between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of sleep apnea in non-obese study participants.The study appeared in the journal Annals of the American Thoracic Society.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_img‘Natya Samagam – Festival of Contemporary Theatre Practices, Traditions and Diverse Cultural Expressions of India’ is being organised by Sangeet Natak Akademi to showcase contemporary and traditional theatre practices. The festival which began on Saturday was inaugurated by Shekhar Sen, chairman, Sangeet natak Akademi. The 9-day festival will be on till January 17.Shekhar Sen, chairman expressed that this was an occasion to understand the diverse  culture of various parts of our country where the tradition of theatre is very old and prevalent in remote areas as well.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’He said that India is a country where Ramlila is being presented since so many years and yet people enjoy watching it. He thanked the Secretary of the Akademi, Helen Acharya and the entire team of Sangeet Natak Akademi for organising this event. Natya Samagam started with an adaptation of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night  called Piya Behrupia directed by Atul Kumar of The Company Theatre, Mumbai. The festival will showcase various traditional and modern plays, interactions with Directors, Children’s theatre and puppetry as well as theatre music. The entry to the festival is free.When: January 9-17Where: Meghdoot Theatre Complex, Rabindra Bhawanlast_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal has made a rapid progress in increasing energy generation from non-conventional sources, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee Friday said. In seven years time from 2011 to 2017-18, the state has recorded an increase in solar power generation from 1.2 megawatts (MW) to 53.216 MW, she twetted on the occasion of the National Energy Conservation Day. The generation of biomass power has also increased from 1.59 MW to 13.29 MW during the same period, Banerjee added. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life “Today is National Energy Conservation Day. Our government in #Bangla is making rapid progress in augmenting generation of energy from non-conventional sources,” Banerjee tweeted. “From 1.2 megawatts (MW) in 2011, solar power generation has increased to 53.216 MW in 2017-18, while generation of biomass power has increased from 1.59 MW to 13.29 MW during the same period,” she added. The state government was conducting a survey to develop a wind power generation plant in Sagar Island, the chief minister said. “A survey is also going on in Sagar Island to develop a wind power generation plant,” she added. With an objective to drive mass awareness about the importance of energy efficiency and conservation, the National Energy Conservation Day is celebrated every year on December 14 by the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) under the Ministry of Power since 1991.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgClémentine Clattaux Delait, born on March 5, 1865, in Chaumousey, France, became one of the most famous bearded ladies of the late 19th and 20th century in Europe. While her fame and story faded over the decades following her death, Delait was rediscovered when a second-hand collector purchased her private memoirs at a garage sale in 2005.Delait’s 50-page memoir included fascinating photographs, press cuttings, and detailed accounts of her life as her popularity grew.Clémentine Delait in 1923. Photo by Scherr CC BY 4.0Madame Delait. Photo by Wellcome Images CC BY 4.0Delait married a local baker in 1885 and opened up a café and bakery in Taon-Les-Vosges, located in northeastern France. Delait, who shaved her face every day, had never considered growing her beard out. In her memoir, she described the time she went to a carnival in Nancy and left unimpressed with the bearded lady she visited. After returning to work at the café, and knowing she could grow a better beard, she made a bet with a customer that would change her life — and image — forever.“The success was immediate…they were all crazy about me,” Delait stated in her memoir.Feeling inspired by the rising attention to her new look, Delait renamed her café as “Café de la Femme Barbe” (Café of the Bearded Woman). Along with the name change, Delait and her husband began selling souvenirs, picture postcards, and signed photographs of Delait sporting her beard.By this time, people and the press from all over Europe were regularly visiting Delait’s café to meet her. Invitations were pouring in, begging Delait to take part in overseas exhibits and carnivals. Although she was flattered, Delait took too much pride in her café to leave and was too devoted to her husband, especially when he became weak in health.Madame Delait, the bearded lady of Plombières. Photo by Scherr CC BY 4.0Madame Delait, the bearded lady of Plombières. Photo by Scherr CC BY 4.0Madame Delait. Photo by Wellcome Images CC BY 4.0In her memoirs, she stated “It never entered my head that I could be nothing more than a female curiosity exhibited.” She went on to write “I was much more and much better than that.”As time passed and with the success of her café, Delait pursued other hobbies and interests. During the Great War she worked as a volunteer nurse, regularly took part in outdoor cycling, and was a dog lover.Possibly the same medical condition or hormonal imbalance that resulted in her ability to grow a beard, Delait wasn’t able to conceive children of her own. After 30 years of marriage, Delait and her husband adopted a 5-year-old girl who lost her parents to a Spanish flu.Read another story from us: 8 Creepy Museums in AmericaWhen Delait’s husband passed away in 1928, she finally accepted invitations to travel abroad. She spent her remaining years enjoying a quiet life of leisure and died in 1939. “Here lies Clementine Delait, the bearded lady” is carved as an epitaph on her tombstone as she requested. Delait’s memoir closes by her saying “My modest life was without reproach. I was held in esteem by all my compatriots.”last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgOver 180 are believed to be dead, as Turkey devolved into total chaos last night. A faction of the Turkish military attempted a coup to overthrow Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. At 10:00 pm, the military announced that it had seized control of the government.Tanks were sent into the streets, F-16’s were scrambled, and the military called for citizens to remain in their homes.  The military gained control over bridges and established a presence in the main squares of Ankara and Istanbul. Explosions rocked the cities.Retweeted Rosy (@rose_k01):Another explosion at #Turkey ‘s Parliament. #TurkeyCoupAttempt pic.twitter.com/mu1tbJR8Vk https://t.co/n1Z9N7JOtA— Alain Bertrand (@AlainBertrandmu) July 16, 2016 People lie down in front of tanks and berate soldiers during the #TurkeyCoupAttempthttps://t.co/tioQZb1haJ— Channel 4 News (@Channel4News) July 16, 2016One shocking video shows citizens facing incoming fire from a military helicopter.#TurkeyCoupAttempt: Shocking video shows civilians shot at by military helicopter. Authenticity’s yet to confirmhttps://t.co/NCAainRO1m— People’s Daily,China (@PDChina) July 16, 2016 Turkey’s President Erdogan addresses nation via mobile phone as military declare takeover https://t.co/SMpZElrzBr https://t.co/guNCWBwNap— BBC News (World) (@BBCWorld) July 15, 2016 Journalists stand up to soldiers with guns who stormed their newsroom during the #TurkeyCoupAttempthttps://t.co/zZcrv6VCQv— Channel 4 News (@Channel4News) July 16, 2016 Citizens complied with the Erdogan’s plea and poured into the streets in support of the deposed President. They also swarmed the Ataturk Airport, the site of a terrorist bombing a just over two weeks ago.What a night at #AtaturkAirport #Istanbul, #TurkishCoup pic.twitter.com/RTZnREPXJQ— Sayda Zainab (@Saydazainab143) July 16, 2016center_img Advertisement In the midst of the takeover President Erdogan used a Facetime address with CNNTurkey to reaffirm that he was still in control of the government. He urged citizens to take to the streets, and to the Ataturk Airport in Istanbul, stating, “I am calling you to the streets.” Today, President Erdogan has announced that the coup has been thwarted, and that he has retained control of the government. He called for perpetrators to be punished as traitors and face likely death.It appears the Turkey coup attempt is over, but the chaos and unrest in the Middle East is percolating at an unprecedented rate.last_img read more


Month: August 2019

first_imgTiger Woods came up just short at the British Open after faltering on the back nine on Sunday at Carnoustie, and one of his errant shots ended up drilling a fan who was recording the whole thing until the shank knocked the camera out of his hand.Even though it’s a shot Tiger would like to forget, this fan never will.In case anyone cares, this was the video I was taking when I was struck by my DEAR FRIEND @TigerWoods pic.twitter.com/6tH1SCdTU8— Colin Hauck (@ColinHauck) July 22, 2018last_img


Month: August 2019

first_img Advertisement Le’Veon Bell’s holdout will enter it’s fourth week and it seems inevitable that Pittsburgh will eventually trade their disgruntled running back. Any team that does pull of a deal will have to do so facing the reality that Bell could walk after the season, but Colin thinks the Jets should get aggressive and make the move.Today he gave three reasons why New York rolling the dice and trading for Bell makes sense. Being passive isn’t a winning approach in the NFL. It’s time for the Jets to make a statement and get their franchise QB some much needed help.Here’s Colin to explain:Trade for Le’Veon Bell, NY Jets.@ColinCowherd gives 3 reasons why you should. pic.twitter.com/6kYGZemw1d— Herd w/Colin Cowherd (@TheHerd) September 25, 2018last_img