Month: July 2019

Month: July 2019

first_imgDistrict Attorney George Gascón will make a decision in six to eight weeks on whether to charge the officers who fatally shot a homeless man in the Mission in April 2016, said Adriana Camarena, an advocate for the man’s family who met with Gascón on Wednesday. Camarena said that during the meeting, Gascón gave her and the family of Luis Gongora Pat a “lecture about the law and why it’s so difficult to press charges.” Camarena talked to reporters on the Hall of Justice steps following the meeting. It was the first time Gascón had met with the family since the incident. The District Attorney’s office has filed no charges in any of the five police shootings in the Mission District since 2011.  0% “It’s been an upsetting meeting, mostly because George Gascón doesn’t have an answer for why he hasn’t charged officers in any single case since he entered office,” Camarena said. “He just says it’s very hard.”  Police shooting cases are notoriously difficult to prosecute because an officer’s state of mind – whether they perceived a threat –plays a major role in determining whether the officer acted reasonably and within the law. But Camarena argued that Gascón should be using his new $1.5 million unit dedicated to investigating police shootings and in-custody deaths to overcome those hurdles. She further asserted that Gascón is prioritizing new cases over old ones, such as Gongora Pat’s. She said an investigator named Andrew Law has been assigned to the case, and she has given him the names of eight eyewitnesses who contradict the officers’ accounts. Law is following up with the witnesses, she said. “They say they have been looking at all the evidence,” Camarena said. On April 7, 2016, Sergeant Nate Steger and Officer Michael Mellone fatally shot Gongora Pat, a resident of a tent encampment on Shotwell Street, who police say charged at officers with a large knife. However, eight eyewitnesses told reporters in the days after the shooting that Gongora Pat never threatened the officers. They shot him within 30 seconds of exiting their patrol car, according to the record.Steger and Mallone are both on active duty, said SFPD spokesperson Officer Giselle Linnane. She said Steger is now assigned to the Special Operations Bureau while Mellone is assigned to the Administrative Bureau.  Gascón has declined to file charges in any of the cases in which police have killed civilians. His office has completed 11 of the 20 investigations underlying his decisions on whether to file charges in such cases. The other nine cases, including Gongora Pat’s, remain open. Camarena was not confident Gascón would file charges, but made it clear she and others would continue to press for justice. “Basically, the District Attorney is today guaranteeing police impunity because he has not filed charges in any single case,” Camarena said. “So are we hopeful? We’re always going to be hopeful … that he will have the courage to fight for a case, even if it’s hard. That is his job.”Camarena was joined by Gongora Pat’s cousin, Luis Poot Pat, as well as his brother, Jose Gongora Pat. “It was a complicated meeting,” Poot Pat said. “We are expecting him to press charges, but he has to have the courage to face us and tell us what his decision is going to be in this case.”  Camarena said a “low-profile observer” from the Mexican consulate was present at the meeting, as Gongora Pat was an immigrant from Yucatan. She said the consulate lodged a “formal protest” with the United States government following the incident. “Depending on what the DA does or doesn’t do, we (activists and the consulate) do have the ability to request the case be reviewed by the Department of Justice,” she said.  The Gongora Pat’s family has sued the officers and the City of San Francisco for what they believe to be a wrongful death. The trial is set to begin in October. center_img Tags: District Attorney • George Gascon • homeless • homelessness • Luis Gongora • police • police shooting • SFPD Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgSAINTS are sad to report that Harry Wellens passed away at the age of 86 on Monday March 27.Harry served Saints for 30 years from the late seventies as a scout and was instrumental in referring many well-known players to the club over that period.Harry leaves behind his wife of 58 years, Julie and their six children who include former Saints great Paul Wellens.He was raised in the Parr area of St Helens where he always had a keen interest in playing sport.His first love was always rugby league and he made appearances for Saints B and Liverpool City before his rugby league career was cut short in his early twenties following a serious knee injury.Harry became a familiar figure on the touchline of most rugby clubs in the town over his lifetime watching with interest for the next Neil Holding or Paul Loughlin to emerge. Harry worked mainly for St Helens Council as a Painter and Decorator then latterly as a Pay and Bonus Supervisor before retiring in his mid-sixties.He was also a frequent visitor to Greenalls Club Alder Hey Road with his family and close circle of friends. The topic of conversation was usually “The Saints” and if there was time left other sports and the days current affairs would get some attention. He was also known for his dry sense of humour. As his health deteriorated Harry’s appearances at Greenalls became less and less.A family spokesperson said: “Dad finally passed away on Monday morning with family at his side.“We are immensely proud of him and the many messages we have received since are a clear indication of how highly he was regarded in the town.”Our thoughts are with the Wellens’ family at this time.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_img In this week’s edition of Cape Fear History & Mysteries, a local storyteller shares the story of what led up to the death of Edward Teach.Check out the video above to learn more.Then visit WWAYTV3.com/history-mysteries every 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month for another installment of “Cape Fear History & Mysteries.” WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — If you know anything about the history of the Cape Fear region, you likely know about the role pirates played in that history.The most infamous pirate from our area is believed to be Blackbeard.- Advertisement – last_img


Month: July 2019

first_imgPENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Two men have been charged after a Pender County manhunt that lasted most of Sunday afternoon.According to Sgt. Jason Casteen with Highway Patrol, around 11:50 a.m., troopers first attempted to stop a car in Maple Hill. The car drove west on Hwy. 53 towards Burgaw. When it approached the intersection on Shaw Highway, the car’s tires were flattened by stop sticks from Highway Patrol. Officials say while the car was still moving, two suspects jumped out.- Advertisement – Highway Patrol brought in a K9 unit to search for the suspect but was unsuccessful. Late in the afternoon, as the search was being called off, Sgt. Casteen said officers spotted the suspects walking on the side of the road. When law enforcement followed them, the suspects hid in the woods.The first suspect, the passenger, was captured around 5 p.m. The driver was captured around 7:30 p.m. and both were taken to the Pender County Jail.The driver, Richard Daniel Sloan III, 24, of Pender County, was charged with felony speeding, felony to elude and heed siren, possession of a firearm by a felon, driving with license revoked, speeding at 120 MPH in a 55 MPH zone, reckless driving, improper passing, driving left of center line, failure to wear a seat belt, and resist, obstruct and delay. Sloan was placed under a $75,000 bond.Related Article: ‘Staircase’ documentary prosecutor died of natural causesThe passenger, Theaireus Carr, 20, of Durham, was charged with possession of marijuana, resist, obstruct and delay and failure to wear a seat belt.last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_img She also says she believes that despite their young age her students need to be aware of current events and have a voice for change.  “I just want them to know that they matter and that their opinion matters.  They are capable and no matter what they’re going through they can and will succeed as long as they put education first.”As the WWAY Michael and Son Teacher of the Week Ms. Long says her best advice to all students is to “be happy!”If you have a teacher who is making an impact in your life you can nominate them for Teacher of the Week by clicking here. LELAND, NC (WWAY) — Pamela Long says she feels blessed to be a teacher of sixth graders at Leland Middle School.  “I love them so much,” she says, “and they’re just incredible little people.”Long says that teaching is a two way street and she learns a lot from her students.  “I really believe that education should be reciprocal,” she says, “which means that they are also teaching me as I am teaching them.  I’m constantly changing where I sit and stand because we need to all learn together.”- Advertisement – last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_img If you have any information, please contact WPD at (910) 343-3609 or use Text-A-Tip. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Do you know this man? Wilmington police say he is a person of interest in a home break-in that happened last week.Police say the break-in was in the Birch Creek Drive community on August 15.- Advertisement – last_img


Month: July 2019

first_img Firefighters from the Wilmington Fire Department and New Hanover County Fire Services responded to the scene.When the first crews arrived, they reported seeing heavy flames and smoke coming from the garage door area of the home.Firefighters searched the home and didn’t find anyone inside. No one was injured.Related Article: First responders join WARM in hurricane recovery effortsThe fire was deemed accidental and caused an estimated $130,000 in damage to both the structure and contents.The American Red Cross is assisting the residents who lived in the home. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Fire destroyed a Wilmington home late Wednesday night.The fire occurred at 6011 Cedar Ridge Drive and was reported around 10:21 p.m..- Advertisement – last_img


Month: July 2019

first_imgCredit: Omar CamilleriCredit: Omar Camilleri Malta’s record number of drug hauls is thanks to its €2.5 million investment at the Freeport last year, Minister for Finance Edward Scicluna has said.Minister Scicluna explained that owing to 2018 investment in new scanning equipment and a specialised Canine Unit at the Freeport Terminal, Malta’s Customs authority had been able to ‘intensify operations against smuggling of illegal substances.’The investment was ‘bearing fruit,’ Scicluna said.Customs seize €15.7m in cocaine at the FreeportCustoms officials seize €2.7m in cocaine at Freeport€10.3 million in cocaine seized in 19-hour operation by CustomsThese comments were made during a visit by the EU’s Chief Brexit Negotiator Michel Barnier to the Freeport Terminal, discussing Malta’s preparations for Brexit.In addition to discussing the importance of the single market to EU member states, Barnier also praised the Malta’s Customs Department for their efforts in, ‘protecting consumers and businesses from counterfeit goods and thus in strengthening the principles of a single market.’Credit: Omar CamilleriOn the issue of Brexit, Minister Scicluna explained that the Customs Department was prepared and proactive for what could happen with the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union.WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_img SharePrint New PN Member of Parliament Kevin Cutajar was during his first parliamentary discussion when he talked about amending the Ordinance regarding Pensions.Cutajar discussed the pensions of persons with disability and stated that while the economy is prospering, there are entire categories of people, including those who suffer from disabilities, which are not enjoying that wealth. He explained that this is a paradox, and that for him, it hurts when he sees people with disabilities ending up unemployed and not living an independent life.Cutajar asked that Government should seriously consider a reform regarding pensions, so that the country does not face this problem. Meanwhile, Cutajar added that the plan should include sectors such as that of people with disabilities and that they are helped and aided to catch up with the cost of living.Read: Cutajar takes oath to become MP; “Emotional”WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgAdvertisement There’s a new epidemic known as cyberbullying, and it’s widespread — a Pew Research poll reported in 2007 that 32 percent of teenagers had been victims of cyberbullying [source: CNN.com].Stopcyberbullying.org defines cyberbullying as “when one child targets another using interactive technologies,” which can include online games, e-mail, cell phones, text messages and other electronic devices [source: Stopcyberbullying.org]. Cyberbullying includes death threats, sending someone a virus, hacking into an e-mail account, disrupting a person’s playing experience in an online game, intentionally embarrassing someone among his peers and many other actions [source: Stopcyberbullying.org].Cyberbullying has many terms associated with it, and we’ll go over a couple important ones here. Trolling is when someone posts intentionally antagonistic messages on an online bulletin board or discussion area. Griefing, one of the most common forms of cyberbullying, is harassment of another player or participant within an online game. Griefing has many different manifestations, some of which have their own specific names. For example, kill stealing: consistently killing monsters that another player is trying to kill, frustrating his attempts to advance in or play a game. – Advertisement – Acts of cyberbullying vary widely in content and effect, but they can be genuinely traumatic, especially in highly realistic worlds that blur the borders between fantasy and reality. And if an online gamer has invested hundreds or thousands of hours into his avatar (Internet representation of himself), online character or position in a game universe, there can be a significant emotional attachment at stake. On the other hand, posting embarrassing stories and photographs on a social networking site viewed by an entire high school can devastate a student. Cyberbullying often leads to real-life, physical conflicts as well as feelings of depression, hopelessness and loss.There have even been alleged instances of “virtual rape,” one in 2007 in the virtual world of “Second Life,” and another occurring as early as 1993 in “LambdaMOO,” an early text-based online game. The victims have described these events as emotionally scarring. The 2007 “Second Life” virtual rape allegations led to an investigation by Belgian police.Experts say that the Internet makes bad or anti-social behavior easier. The anonymity allowed by the Internet emboldens bullies as they feel shielded from the consequences of their acts. Judith Donath, an MIT professor who studies media and social networks, told CNN that online interactions easily change people’s perceptions of what’s acceptable and what’s not; it also can contribute to a sense that other players or participants aren’t real human beings [source: CNN.com].Much of the material on cyber bullying only mentions children and teenagers, but it’s not limited to them. There are reports of teachers as victims, with some even being forced to give up teaching due to constant harassment. Some kids use technology as a way to rebel against and taunt authority figures. Many of the online gamers who commit and suffer from cyberbullying are adults.On the next page we’ll look at some methods of stopping cyberbullies.howstuffworks.comlast_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgAdvertisement Apple has finally announced the iPhone 5s and the iPhone 5c, both successors to the iPhone 5. After all the rumors and leaks, Apple’s seventh and eighth iPhones are finally official.Yet before you run out and buy one of these gadgets, assuming you’re not interested in Android or Windows Phone, it might be wise to see what you’re getting for your hard-earned cash. As such, we’ve put together two tables to show you what’s new.iPhone 5iPhone 5sPrice on contract$199, $299, $399$199, $299, $399Price off contract$649, $749, $849$649, $749, $849Storage16GB, 32GB, 64GB16GB, 32GB, 64GBDisplay4-inch, 1136×640, 326 ppi4-inch, 1136×640, 326 ppiProcessorsA6A7 64-bitTouch IDFingerprint sensorRear Camera8MP, ƒ/2.4 aperture8MP, 1.5µ pixels, ƒ/2.2 apertureVideo Recording1080p at 30fps1080p at 30fps, Slo-moFront Camera1.2MP photos, 720p video1.2MP photos, 720p videoFaceTimeOver Wi-Fi or cellularOver Wi-Fi or cellularAssistantSiriSiriNavigationGPS and GLONASSGPS and GLONASSBluetooth4.04.0Talk Time on 3GUp to 8 hoursUp to 10 hoursBrowsing time on LTEUp to 8 hoursUp to 10 hoursBrowsing time on 3GUp to 8 hoursUp to 8 hoursBrowsing time on Wi-FiUp to 10 hoursUp to 10 hoursStandby timeUp to 225 hoursUp to 250 hoursHeight4.87 inches (123.8 mm)4.87 inches (123.8 mm)Width2.31 inches (58.6 mm)2.31 inches (58.6 mm)Depth0.30 inch (7.6 mm)0.30 inch (7.6 mm)Weight3.95 ounces (112 grams)3.95 ounces (112 grams)SIM cardNano-SIMNano-SIMConnectorLightningLightningColorsBlack/Slate, White/SilverSilver, Space Gray, Gold ModeliPhone 5iPhone 5cPrice on contract$199, $299, $399$99, $199Price off contract$649, $749, $849$549, $649Storage16GB, 32GB, 64GB16GB, 32GBDisplay4-inch, 1136×640, 326 ppi4-inch, 1136×640, 326 ppiProcessorsA6A6Rear Camera8MP, ƒ/2.4 aperture8MP, ƒ/2.4 apertureVideo Recording1080p at 30fps1080p at 30fpsFront Camera1.2MP photos, 720p video1.2MP photos, 720p videoFaceTimeOver Wi-Fi or cellularOver Wi-Fi or cellularAssistantSiriSiriNavigationGPS and GLONASSGPS and GLONASSBluetooth4.04.0Talk Time on 3GUp to 8 hoursUp to 10 hoursBrowsing time on LTEUp to 8 hoursUp to 10 hoursBrowsing time on 3GUp to 8 hoursUp to 8 hoursBrowsing time on Wi-FiUp to 10 hoursUp to 10 hoursStandby timeUp to 225 hoursUp to 250 hoursHeight4.87 inches (123.8 mm)4.90 inches (124.4 mm)Width2.31 inches (58.6 mm)2.33 inches (59.2 mm)Depth0.30 inch (7.6 mm)0.35 inch (8.97 mm)Weight3.95 ounces (112 grams)4.65 ounces (132 grams)SIM cardNano-SIMNano-SIMConnectorLightningLightningColorsBlack/Slate, White/SilverWhite, Pink, Yellow, Blue, Green – Advertisement – There you have it. So which iPhone is for you?Credit: TNWlast_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgAdvertisement Looks like Smartphones are getting “Smarter” everyday with the increased number of uses that they can be put to.Starwood Hotels has announced that they will host a trial run of a new, mobile check-in option that will allow customers to access their rooms without any hotel-issued keys.The program debut will be showcased at the Aloft hotels in Cupertino, Ca., and in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood by March. Users will access the features through Starwood’s smartphone app and the low-power Bluetooth 4 wireless standard. – Advertisement – The hotel chain has released a video encouraging their would-be customers,”Everything you do today is smart.”The video then follows a young woman throughout her day making “smart” choices, like using her phone to pay for coffee, instead of cash.If you are a guest at one of the participating properties you will receive a message on your phone containing a virtual key, but the feature will only be available for iPhone 4s or newer models and Android phones running at least version 4.3 Jelly BeanStarwood CEO Frits van Paasschen believes this will become the new standard for how people will want to enter a hotel. “It may be a novelty at first, but we think it will become table stakes for managing a hotel,” he said.Below is the video promoting the service.Source: The Blazelast_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgArsenal v B DortmundChampions LeagueLIVE ON ITV, 7.45pm‘WENGER OUT, THEY SAID?’The sack race is always an interesting side show to the Premier League and how increasingly quickly managers are dispensed with but even by Premiership premature standards calls for “Wenger Out” after their opening defeat of the season at home to Aston Villa have subsequently proved, how can I put this politely ? Balderdash.Whilst Paolo Di Canio’s sacking at Sunderland became inevitable and Ian Holloway appears to be hanging on by the skin of his teeth at Crystal Palace after last night’s 4-1 home defeat to Fulham, Wenger has dumbfounded his critics in the best possible way – on the pitch.Arsenal are now on a 12-match unbeaten run in all competitions – 10 of them victories – and sit proudly at the top of the Premier League table.Wenger is 64 today and his best birthday present will come tonight at around 9.30pm if Arsenal can beat last year’s finalists Borussia Dortmund at the Emirates.The teams have met four times so far in the Champions LeagueHEAD TO HEAD RECORD (Max last 10 only) Nov 2011 C/League Arsenal 2-1 B Dortmund Sep 2011 C/League B Dortmund 1-1 Arsenal Oct 2002 C/League B Dortmund 2-1 Arsenal Sep 2002 C/League Arsenal 2-0 B DortmundArsenal beat Napoli 2-0 in the last round and Dortmund comfortably accounted for Marseille winning 3-0.England forward Theo Walcott remains sidelined following a minor setback after surgery on an abdominal problem, but otherwise the Gunners have no fresh injury problems following the 4-1 Barclays Premier League win over Norwich.The stage looks set fair and with both teams not afraid of attacking football it’s the total goals market that again appeals, and over 2.5 goals looks solid at around 8/13 with Star Sports.As for Mr Wenger’s 64th birthday, the Beatles posed a question “Will you still need me, will you still feed me, When I’m sixty-four?”I think the answer is yes.STAR FORECAST(stake between 0.5 and 10 points)6 points win OVER 2.5 GOALS at around 8/13last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgHORSE RACING1.35 FontwellRemiluc 14/1 > 11/21.55 CheltenhamFox Norton 7/2 > 9/42.10 FontwellChef D’oeuvre 7/2 > 5/23.05 CheltenhamBallyarthur 9/2 > 3/1LEAGUE ONE LIVE ON SKYLeague One14:15 Sky Sports 2 / Sky Sports 2 HD4/1 Chesterfield 7/10 Sheffield United 11/4 DRAWBET WITH STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321 [dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Sunday 13 Novemberlast_img


Month: July 2019

first_img[dropcap]I[/dropcap]’m back riding in Ireland on Sunday for the card at Navan. It looks a top class card and I’m sure will throw up plenty of Festival clues.SundayNAVANAFOREMENTIONED (12.15pm)One of two jumps newcomers in the race trained by Joseph (O’Brien) . He’s a half-brother to Darwins Fox who was an eight times jumps winner and loved the mud. The French bred is unraced on the flat or point to points so we’ll learn a lot today and he has the tongue tie on. Cask Mate for Noel Meade looks the one to beat. He hasn’t done a lot wrong and has plenty of experience.POLI ROI (12.50pm Navan Novice Hurdle)This looks a real hot renewal in which I’m onboard Poli Roi – one of three runners for Gordon (Elliott) as he attempts to win this again after Death Duty last year. My fella relished the soft ground when winning a maiden hurdle at Down Royal last time out but this is a huge step up in class for him. Cracking Smart looks a really exciting prospect. He stepped up in class well to win at Listed level in Cork last time. That was over three miles but he previously won over this trip at Punchestown on testing ground so seems to have all the ticks in the boxes. Gordon’s third runner is Delta Wing who, in fairness, hasn’t done a great deal wrong. She was third to the hugely exciting Samcro here in the Monksfield last time. Should be an intriguing race packed full of future clues.DIAMOND CAUCHOIS (1.20pm)I was onboard for his first start since joining Gordon’s stable from Sue Bramall’s yard and was quite pleased with his third at Naas in a decent handicap hurdle. I felt he might need longer than the 2m 4f that day but the likely testing conditions could seem him go close over this same trip, especially if he can build on that Naas run in this wide open handicap.MILSEAN (2.30pm)Has become a touch disappointing this season but is back on testing ground which offers a glimmer of hope. All of his three wins have been on soft or heavy ground and his best run ever was his half length second to Martello Tower in the Albert Bartlett at the 2015 Festival when the ground was soft.Good luck DavyYOUR SAYIf you have a question for Davy drop us a line at content@www.starsportsbet.co.uk and we’ll try and include in the next blog…BET WITH STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321last_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgWelcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Wednesday 18 April HORSE RACING2.05 CheltenhamDiese Des Bieffes 5/2 > 7/43.50 CheltenhamTintern Theatre 12/1 > 6/14.45 NewmarketRococo 11/2 > 3/16.30 DundalkEl Greco 11/8 > 8/158.45 KemptonOn Fire 20/1 > 6/1LIVE PREMIER LEAGUEPremier League19:45 BT Sport 1 / BT Sport 4K UHD16/5 AFC Bournemouth 10/11 Man Utd 14/5 DRAWBET NOW starsports.bet or 08000 521 321last_img


Month: July 2019

first_imgShareCONTACT: B.J. Almond PHONE: (713) 348-6770 E-MAIL: balmond@rice.edu Three named to Rice University Board of Trustees Robert Clarke, Robert Tudor III and Robert Maxfield have more than just their first names in common: All are alumni of Rice University, and all were recently named to Rice’s board of trustees for a four-year term that begins July 1. Clarke is a senior partner at the law firm Bracewell & Giuliani L.L.P. Tudor is a managing director of Goldman, Sachs and Co., a full-service international investment banking and brokerage firm. Maxfield is a private investor and was co-founder of ROLM Corporation, a telecommunications and computer manufacturer. “Bob Clarke and Bobby Tudor, who are new to the board, bring a worldwide perspective, having lived and worked in Europe and the Middle East,” said James Crownover, chair of the Rice University Board of Trustees. ” They also achieved the highest levels of success within their professions.  Bob Maxfield has been a very successful entrepreneur and brings an unparalleled depth of experience in Rice financial and technical matters.” Rice President David Leebron said, “I am very pleased with the additional strength and capability that the election of these trustees will add to the board as we enter an important phase in our planning for the future of Rice.” Clarke, who was raised in Hobbs, N.M., graduated from Rice in 1963 with a B.A. in economics. He received an L.L.B. from Harvard in 1966. While at Rice, Clarke served as an officer of Hanszen College and as Student Association president. A member of the Thresher staff, the Honor Council and the Army ROTC, Clarke was an outstanding senior and a distinguished military student. He received the Cameron Service Award, and in 1992 he was named a Distinguished Alumnus of Rice. At Bracewell & Giuliani, Clarke’s principal areas of practice include assisting banks in the U.S. and abroad in matters involving state and federal banking laws, regulations and supervisory agencies, mergers and acquisitions of financial institutions, strategic planning, independent counsel to boards of directors, new financial services products, management of regulatory risk, and litigation support as an expert witness. President Ronald Reagan appointed Clarke as U.S. comptroller of the currency – a position to which he was reappointed by President George H.W. Bush.   The banks supervised by this office account for about two-thirds of the assets of the commercial banking system.   When Clarke’s appointment as comptroller ended, he rejoined Bracewell & Giuliani in 1991 as senior partner and head of the firm’s financial services practice. Clarke received the Distinguished Service Award from the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury in 1992 and the Banking Leadership Award from the Western States School of Banking in 1993. Alexandria, La., native Tudor graduated from Rice in 1982 with a B.A. in English and legal studies.   He received a J.D. from Tulane Law School in 1987. While at Rice, Tudor was a resident and an officer of Hanszen College and student representative on the University Committee on Examinations and Standing. He lettered in basketball and received the Bob Quin Award for being the male senior athlete who most exemplified distinction in athletics, academics and leadership. Before attending graduate school, Tudor spent two years as a professional basketball player with Turnerschaft Raifeissen in Innsbruck, Austria, where he also had a Fulbright Teaching Fellowship. Tudor joined Goldman, Sachs in 1987 in the Investment Banking Division in New York. He became a managing director in 1996 and was named a partner in 1998. After five years in London, where he headed the Industrial and Natural Resources group, Tudor returned to Houston in 2005 as a managing director in the Investment Banking Division again.             Houston Mayor Bill White appointed Tudor to the Houston Library Board of Directors to complete an unexpired term that ends March 1, 2007.   Tudor served as president of the “R” Association’s Board of Directors at Rice last year and on the Association of Rice Alumni Board of Directors. Maxfield was renamed to the Rice Board of Trustees after taking a year off in compliance with the limitation on two consecutive four-year terms. Raised in Wichita Falls, Texas, Maxfield graduated from Rice with a B.A., magna cum laude, in 1963, and a B.S. in electrical engineering in 1964.   He also received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1966 and 1969, respectively. While a student at Rice, Maxfield was a resident of Hanszen College who lettered in varsity swimming, and his honor society memberships included Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Tau. Maxfield co-founded ROLM Corp. in 1969 with three fellow Rice graduates and served as the company’s executive vice president and director. In 1984 ROLM merged with International Business Machines Corp. (IBM), where Maxfield had worked previously, and he continued to serve as executive vice president until 1988.   Since 1989, Maxfield has been a consulting professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University and a director of Echelon Corp., which the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal ranked as No. 20 on its list of the region’s 50 fastest-growing companies in 2003. Harvard Business School named the Rice co-founders of ROLM as Entrepreneur of the Year in 1980, and Rice has given Maxfield three alumni honors: Distinguished Alumni Award (2004), Outstanding Engineering Alumnus (1999) and Rice Engineering Alumni Association’s Outstanding Engineer (1964). Rice trustees re-elected to a second consecutive four-year term were Alfredo Brener, Robert Brockman, Bruce Dunlevie, Lynn Elsenhans, Marc Shapiro and L.E. Simmons. Others serving on the board during the new fiscal year along with Crownover will be J.D. Bucky Allshouse, Kent Anderson, Teveia Rose Barnes, Vicki Whamond Bretthauer, Albert Chao, Edward Dominguez, Douglas Foshee, Susanne Morris Glasscock, Carl Isgren, Terry Koonce, Michael Lynch, Steven Miller and Kenneth Oshman. AddThislast_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgShareCONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE: 713-348-6778E-MAIL: jadeboyd@rice.eduBiotech breakthrough could end biodiesel’s glycerin glutRice engineers find way to make ethanol, valuable chemicals from waste glycerinWith U.S. biodiesel production at an all-time high and a record number of new biodiesel plants under construction, the industry is facing an impending crisis over waste glycerin, the major byproduct of biodiesel production. New findings from Rice University suggest a possible answer in the form of a bacterium that ferments glycerin and produces ethanol, another popular biofuel.“We identified the metabolic processes and conditions that allow a known strain of E. coli to convert glycerin into ethanol,” said chemical engineer Ramon Gonzalez. “It’s also very efficient. We estimate the operational costs to be about 40 percent less that those of producing ethanol from corn.”Gonzalez said the biodiesel industry’s rapid growth has created a glycerin glut. The glut has forced glycerin producers like Dow Chemical and Procter and Gamble to shutter plants, and Gonzalez said some biodiesel producers are already unable to sell glycerin and instead must pay to dispose of it.“One pound of glycerin is produced for every 10 pounds of biodiesel,” said Gonzalez, Rice’s William Akers Assistant Professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. “The biodiesel business has tight margins, and until recently, glycerin was a valuable commodity, one that producers counted on selling to ensure profitability.”Researchers across the globe are racing to find ways to turn waste glycerin into profit. While some are looking at traditional chemical processing — finding a way to catalyze reactions that break glycerin into other chemicals — others, including Gonzalez, are focused on biological conversion. In biological conversion, researchers engineer a microorganism that can eat a specific chemical feedstock and excrete something useful. Many drugs are made this way, and the chemical processing industry is increasingly finding bioprocessing to be a “greener,” and sometimes cheaper, alternative to chemical processing.In a review article in the June issue of Current Opinion in Biotechnology, Gonzalez points out that very few microorganisms are capable of digesting glycerin in an oxygen-free environment. This oxygen-free process — known as anaerobic fermentation — is the most economical and widely used process for biological conversion.“We are confident that our findings will enable the use of E. coli to anaerobically produce ethanol and other products from glycerin with higher yields and lower costs than can be obtained using common sugar-based feedstocks like glucose and xylose,” Gonzalez said.The report in Current Opinion in Biotechnology was co-authored by postdoctoral research associate Syed Shams Yazdani. Graduate students Yandi Dharmadi and Abhishek Murarka assisted with the research. Gonzalez’s research is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Science Foundation. AddThislast_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgShareCONTACT: Franz BrotzenPHONE: 713-348-6775EMAIL: franz.brotzen@rice.eduDec. 3 Baker Institute panel to focus on intersection of religion, health-related issuesWhat roles do a patient’s spiritual and religious beliefs and practices play in coping with disease, medical decision-making and other health-related processes? A Dec. 3 panel discussion at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy will address that topic, which has relevance for patients, practitioners, scholars and lay people.The two-hour event, titled “Faith in the Corridors of Medicine,” will begin at 6:30 p.m. in Baker Hall’s Doré Commons on the Rice campus, 6100 Main St. For directions, go to www.bakerinstitute.org/media/media_directions.cfm.The panel discussion is the inaugural event of the Religion and Public Life Program, which is part of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research and directed by Elaine Howard Ecklund, assistant professor of sociology at Rice University and a Rice scholar at the Baker Institute. The Dec. 3 event will bring together top scholars in religion and health care for a panel discussion on the intersection of faith and medicine, including Ecklund, who authored “Science vs. Religion: What Scientists Really Think,” which examines attitudes in the nation’s scientific community toward religious beliefs.Ecklund will be joined on the panel by William Martin, the Harry and Hazel Chavanne Senior Fellow in Religion and Public Policy at the Baker Institute; Wendy Cadge, associate professor of sociology at Brandeis University; Farr Curlin, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago; and John Graham, director of the Institute for Spirituality and Health.The event is sponsored by the Religion and Public Life Program at the Kinder Institute, the Baker Institute Religion and Public Policy Program, the Institute for Spirituality and Health, and the Baker Institute Science and Technology Policy Program.Members of the news media who want to attend should RSVP to Franz Brotzen at franz.brotzen@rice.edu or 713-348-6775. AddThislast_img read more


Month: July 2019

first_imgNaomi Halashttp://news.rice.edu/files/2012/05/Naomi-J.-Halas.jpg AddThis Jeff Taborhttp://news.rice.edu/files/2012/05/Jeff-Tabor.jpgLocated on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is known for its “unconventional wisdom.” With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 4 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to www.rice.edu/nationalmedia/Rice.pdf.center_img ShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduRice scientists, engineers awarded DOD grantsMURI grants target controlled propagation of signals in nanostructures, cell-based sensors HOUSTON – (May 23, 2012) – Rice University scientists are set to lead one research team and are part of a second among the 23 awards announced by the Department of Defense (DOD) under its Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program. The DOD grants total $155 million.Naomi Halas, the Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and professor of Chemistry, Bioengineering and Physics and Astronomy, is the principal investigator on a grant issued by the Army Research Office.Halas will administer the five-year grant expected to be worth $6.25 million that will fund research at Rice, the University of Michigan, the University of Minnesota and Ohio State University.The research will address the topic of “novel nanostructures for the controlled propagation of electromagnetic energy.” Her group is investigating nanoparticles and nanoparticle-based complexes that can be designed to selectively transmit or block certain specific colors of light from the far-infrared to the ultraviolet with well-defined depths and line widths.The ultimate goal is to develop coatings, paints or even aerosols that absorb or transmit light in a predesigned manner, at any region across much of the visible and infrared region of the spectrum. This basic idea could give rise to a range of technologies, from smart walls and windows to complex communications technologies that would be difficult if not impossible to detect.“I am so pleased to be supported by the DOD to work with this extraordinarily talented group of scientists and engineers,” Halas said. “This project creates an opportunity for us to greatly expand our research efforts in this area to include new, biocompatible materials and to develop new infrared technologies.” Peter Nordlander, a Rice professor of physics and astronomy and of electrical and computer engineering, and Stephan Link, an assistant professor of chemistry and chemical and biomolecular engineering, are part of the project team.Jeff Tabor, an assistant professor of bioengineering, is part of the second grant. Tabor, whose interest is in synthetic biology, will work with former mentor Christopher Voigt, an assistant professor of biological engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and principal investigator on a project titled “Next-generation devices; model-guided discovery and optimization of cell-based sensors.”Tabor’s lab at Rice’s BioScience Research Collaborative will take part in a grant that also includes Pennsylvania State University, Rutgers University, the California Institute of Technology and the University of Minnesota to develop a way to program biology to “attain non-natural functions” for the Office of Naval Research.They will seek to make cells for industrial applications that can detect what Tabor called “unnatural signals, like ultraviolet light, infrared light, electromagnetic radiation and magnetic fields.” He said the goal is to reprogram the DNA of bacteria to express sensors that detect particular wavelengths and perform signal processing, characterization and perhaps even logical functions.Tabor, who was a postdoctoral researcher in Voigt’s MIT lab, said his group will mine genetic databases for genes that can be used to program cells to sense the unnatural signals. “The long-term goal is to improve the robustness of engineered cellular circuits so they can be used in a wide variety of non-laboratory applications,” he said.Through in vitro “breadboarding” of cellular circuitry, the team will work toward building tunable, programmable synthetic sensors that reliably respond to light and magnetic fields in real environments.The highly competitive MURI program “opens up entirely new areas of scientific inquiry and builds the foundation for future capabilities that will benefit our joint forces,” said Zachary J. Lemnios, the assistant secretary of defense for research and engineering. “We are also employing new processes to share research results with our industry partners at a much earlier point to accelerate the transition of concepts from research to end-use products.”Rice is among 63 academic institutions that received MURI awards this year.-30-Related materials:Department of Defense press release: http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=15283Full list of MURI projects: http://www.defense.gov/news/2012MURI.pdfHalas Research Group: http://halas.rice.edu/Tabor Lab: http://www.taborlab.rice.edu/Photos for download:last_img read more